Here's a running list of the lawmakers planning to boycott Trump's inauguration

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From his controversial politics to his recent comments questioning civil rights legend and U.S. Rep. John Lewis, President-elect Donald Trump has inspired nearly 30 Democratic lawmakers to boycott his inauguration -- and the list is growing by the hour.

Michigan Rep. Keith Ellison, a contender to lead the DNC, became one of the latest to join on Monday afternoon, saying he could "not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate." Texas Rep. Lloyd Doggett and Rep. Karen Bass of California announced plans to boycott as well on Tuesday.

SEE THE FULL LIST OF LAWMAKERS BOYCOTTING THE INAUGURATION IN THE GALLERY BELOW:

66 PHOTOS
Democrats who didn't attend the inauguration
See Gallery
Democrats who didn't attend the inauguration

Rep. Keith Ellison

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. Congressman John Lewis

REUTERS/Brian Snyder 

Rep. Ruben Gallego

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard

(Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)

Representative Mark Takano

Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Yvette Clarke

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

US Representative Ted Lieu

 (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Jerrold Nadler

REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES)

 Rep. Raul Grijalva

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. Rep. John Conyers

 (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

 Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep. Mark DeSaulnier

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Nydia Velazquez

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Kurt Schrader

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep. William Lacy Clay

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep. Barbara Lee 

(Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation)

 Jose Serrano

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Rep. Judy Chu

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Luis Gutierrez  

REUTERS/Jason Reed 

Rep. Jared Huffman

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Catherine Cortez Masto

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Earl Blumenauer

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Alma Adams, D-N.C.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep. Adriano Espaillat

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Jerry McNerney

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep.-elect Pramila Jayapal

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

 Rep. Mark Pocan

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 Marcia Fudge

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Dwight Evans, D-Pa.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Representative Maxine Waters

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Don Beyer

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN)

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-FL)

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Rep. Tony Cardenas, D-California

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-California

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-California

Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Robert Brady, D-Pa.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Grace Napolitano, D-California

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Penn.

(Photo by Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Chellie Pingree

(Photo by Carl D. Walsh/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-California

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Katherine Clark

(Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Juan Vargas, D-California

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Carol Shea-Porter, D-N.H.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Darren Soto

(Photo: Twitter)

Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Alcee Hastings (R) of Florida

(REUTERS/Joe Skipper)

Rep. Grace Meng, D-NY.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mike Quigley, D-Ill.

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)

Rep. Dan Lipinski, R-Ill.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, D-N.Y.

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Anthony Brown, D-Md.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss.

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call/Getty Images)

Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-NC)

(Photo by Teresa Kroeger/Getty Images for Google)

Rep. Donald Payne Jr.

(Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images)

Rep. Brendan Boyle, D-Pa.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill.

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call/Getty Images)

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Rep. Lewis drew the ire of Trump late last week when he told NBC News he did not plan to attend the inauguration because he did not consider Trump to be a "legitimate" president, citing the election interference from Russia when pressed to explain why.

"I don't plan to attend the inauguration," Lewis said. "It will be the first one that I miss since I've been in Congress. You cannot be at home with something that you feel that is wrong, is not right."

On Wednesday, Lewis' camp admitted he had missed one prior inauguration, skipping George W. Bush's in 2001 over concerns about the election process.

Trump responded the next day by attacking Lewis and saying he should spend more time focused on his own "failing" district.

SEE MORE: Trump to John Lewis: Fix your 'horrible' Atlanta district

The response from Trump inspired a wave of progressive backlash, with a new crop of Democrats announcing their intentions to boycott the inauguration over the comments about Lewis.

17 PHOTOS
Rep. John Lewis
See Gallery
Rep. John Lewis
U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a civil-rights icon, who was lambasted over the weekend by President-elect Donald Trump after Lewis questioned the legitimacy of Trump's election, speaks at the 5000 Role Models of Excellence breakfast at Jungle Island on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 16, 2017 in Miami. (Emily Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA) takes part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA), center, speaks as Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), left, and Representative Cedric Richmond (D-LA) look on as they take part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions, a Republican from Alabama and attorney general nominee for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, not pictured, in Washington, D.C. U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. Senator Cory Booker broke with tradition today and became the fist-sitting senator testify against a fellow senators nomination for a Cabinet post. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, from left, speaks while standing next to Representative Joseph 'Joe' Crowley, a Democrat from New York, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, and Representative Charles 'Charlie' Rangel, a Democrat from New York, outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 23, 2016. Democrats closed out a marathon sit-in on the U.S. House floor Thursday afternoon after 25 hours of emotionally charged speeches demanding action on gun control, but they insisted their protests would continue in other forms. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: U.S. Representative John Lewis attends the Prayer Breakfast at the 45th Annual Legilative Black Caucus Foundation at Walter E. Washington Convention Center on September 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 19: United States Congressman John Lewis is honored before the game between the New York Mets and the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on June 19, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia and one of the original Selma marchers, speaks during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, on March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) Former First Lady Laura Bush, First Lady Michelle Obama, US President Barack Obama and US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, holds hands during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) US President Barack Obama holds hands with US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, alongside former US President George W. Bush during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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New York Rep. Yvette Clarke was among those who pegged her lack of attendance specifically to Trump's comments, saying in a tweet, "When you insult [John Lewis], you insult America."

California Rep. Mark DeSaulnier announced plans to skip the 45th president's inauguration on Friday, ahead of Trump's response to Lewis.

"I was hopeful the President-elect would turn away from the divisive and contentious behavior exhibited during the campaign and embrace a message to unify all Americans," he said in a statement announcing his decision. "Sadly, we have witnessed one polarizing action after another. Since being elected, he has demonstrated hostility toward our free and open press, committed to gutting health insurance for millions of hardworking families, and is filling his cabinet with nominees more closely aligned with Wall Street than Main Street."

SEE MORE: Trump tweet sends John Lewis book sales soaring

Rep. Luis Gutierrez of Illinois was among the first to announce plans to boycott the inauguration.

"I cannot go to (the) inauguration of a man who's going to appoint people to the Supreme Court and turn back the clock on women and turn back the clock on immigrants and the safety and freedom that we fought for them," he told CNN in December.

While some of the lawmakers have actively chosen to make their opposition to Trump known, others told AOL News they never planned to attend, since the inauguration falls during a congressional recess and the city will otherwise be overwhelmed with visitors.

As of January 16, only members of the House of Representatives had voiced their opposition to the event, and no senators had specifically announced plans to boycott. Many -- but not all -- of the lawmakers planning to avoid the January 20 events hail from reliably Democratic states, including New York, California and Massachusetts.

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