Protests will aim to disrupt Trump inauguration: organizers

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Thousands of demonstrators are expected to turn out in Washington next week for protests aiming to "shut down" the inauguration of Donald Trump as the next U.S. president, organizers said on Thursday.

Protesters will attempt to close down 12 security checkpoints at the U.S. Capitol, where Trump will take the oath of office on Jan. 20, and along the 2.5-mile (4-km) parade route down Pennsylvania Avenue, according to leaders of a group called DisruptJ20.

Related: Signs from anti-Trump protests across the country

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Signs from anti-Trump protests across the country
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Signs from anti-Trump protests across the country

A woman takes part during a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016.

(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Demonstrators gather to rally against Donald Trump as President at the Parkman Bandstand on Boston Common in Boston on Nov. 9, 2016.

(Photo by John Blanding/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

People protest outside Trump Tower following President-elect Donald Trump's election victory in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Protesters reach Trump Tower as they march against Republican president-elect president Donald Trump in the neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, U.S., November 09, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

Protestors march against Republican Donald Trump's victory in Tuesday's U.S. presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mark Makela)

People stage a protest against President-elect Donald Trump of Republican Party in front of the Trump Tower in Chicago, United States on November 9, 2016.

(Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

A sign reading "Grab Her By The What Mr. President" lies on the ground as people gather to protest the election of Republican Donald Trump as the president of the United States outside of City Hall in Los Angeles, California, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon)

Protesters walk during a protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kamil Krzacznski/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

A protester holds a sign during a protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump outside Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kamil Krzacznski)

Protesters hold signs in opposition to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mary Schwalm)

Cristina Levert, who attended Berkeley High and who has a 17 year-old who attends Berkeley High, holds up a sign during a protest in response to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage)

A protester holds a sign during a protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump outside Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kamil Krzacznski)

People stage a protest against President-elect Donald Trump of Republican Party in front of the Trump Tower in Chicago, United States on November 9, 2016.

(Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Protestors shout slogans during a demonstratioin on 5th Avenue across from Trump Tower on November 9, 2016 in New York, after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the US.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

A protester holds a sign during a protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump outside Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago, Illinois, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kamil Krzacznski)

Protesters demonstrate across the street from Trump Tower after the election selected Republican president-elect Donald Trump in New York, New York, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Demonstrators protest against the election of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump in front of the White House in Washington November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

A woman holds a placard at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Hannah McKay)

People gather to protest the election of Republican Donald Trump as the president of the United States outside of City Hall in Los Angeles, California, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon)

Protestors march against Republican Donald Trump's victory in Tuesday's U.S. presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mark Makela)

Demonstrators gather before start of rally against Donald Trump as President at the Parkman Bandstand on Boston Common in Boston on Nov. 9, 2016.

(Photo by John Blanding/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Demonstrators hold signs during a rally against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump near Trump Tower in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in Manhattan on Wednesday night and converged on Trump Tower in Midtown to protest the election of Donald J. Trump as president.  

(Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A protestor holds a placard on 5th Avenue across the street from Trump Tower on November 9, 2016, after Donald Trump won the election.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

A demonstrator holds a sign and protests against Donald Trump's presidency at Washington Square Park on November 9, 2016 in New York City.

(Photo by Matthew Eisman/WireImage)

A demonstrator carries a placard in protest against the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States, across from the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/David Becker)

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"We want to shut down the inauguration," organizer David Thurston told a news conference. "We want to see a seething rebellion develop in this city and across the country."

A representative of the Trump transition team could not be immediately reached for comment, nor could a spokesman for the District of Columbia police.

After a deeply polarizing campaign, Trump's surprise victory in the Nov. 8 election has inflamed passions across the political spectrum.

The Republican president-elect's supporters embrace his brash, no-nonsense style and image as an astute problem-solver. His detractors are dismayed by what they see as an authoritarian bent and an array of provocative policy pronouncements.

SEE ALSO: Bruce Springsteen cover band booked for Donald Trump's all-American Inaugural Ball

DisruptJ20, which is working with Black Lives Matter and other protest groups, said it also planned predawn blockades and disruptive demonstrations during inaugural balls in the evening.

Some 300 DisruptJ20 volunteers will work to mobilize demonstrators for a series of protests the group has dubbed the "Festival of Resistance."

"We are not in favor of a peaceful transition of power, and we need to stop it," organizer Legba Carrefour said.

RELATED: Prominent 'Not My President' anti-Trump protests

The group has three protest permits and "promises other surprises," said spokeswoman Samantha Miller.

All told, 27 protest groups have been granted permits, more than four times the average number for past inaugurations, according to the National Park Service.

The Women's March, on the day after the inauguration, is expected to attract 200,000 people, said the park service, which issues permits.

Related: Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history

28 PHOTOS
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
See Gallery
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
1788: The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, also present are (from left) Alexander Hamilton, Robert R Livingston, Roger Sherman, Mr Otis, Vice President John Adams, Baron Von Steuben and General Henry Knox. Original Artwork: Printed by Currier & Ives. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
United States President Thomas Jefferson tethers his horses to a post before attending his inauguration.
379933 07: A painting depicting the celebration of the Inauguration of President Andrew Jackson in 1829. Jackson was seventh President of the United States. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
The Inauguration of President Polk, 1845. James Knox Polk (1795-1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849. From the Illustrated London News, 19 April 1845. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address - in front of the Washington State House of Representatives. March 1861. AB: Sixteenth President of the United States: 12 February 1809 Â 15 April 1865. Colourised version. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the united states March 4, 1861 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The inauguration of James Buchanan as President, Washington, 1857. James Buchanan (1791-1868) was the fifteenth President of the United States, serving office between 1857 and 1861. He was the only President from Pennsylvania and the only President to never marry. From the Illustrated London News, 28 March 1857. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C. 1865. Photo shows President Lincoln standing in the centre of the photo (below the flag and to the left), on the east front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax taking the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 4th 1869, before a large crowd. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
President McKinley delivering his inaugural address in front of Cleveland. McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He led the nation to victory in the SpanishÂAmerican War and raised protective tariffs to promote American industry. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Franklin D. Roosevelt waving to the crowd in front of the Capitol after making his second inaugural address. (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
United States President Franklin Roosevelt delivering the inaugural address following his election to a fourth term, Washington, DC, 1944. (Photo by Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)
Dwight Eisenhower is inaugurated as President of the United States. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
379933 08: President John Fitzgerald Kennedy making his inaugural address as thirty-fifth president of the United States January 20, 1961. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the thirty-fifth President of the United States on January 20, 1961 in Washington DC. At the first row : US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy (2nd L), US former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (3rd L) and US Vice President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo credit should read SAM SCHULMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Richard Nixon waves from car during inaugural parade. (Photo by John Duprey/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Democrat Jimmy Carter is sworn in by chief justice Earl Burger as the 39th president of the United States while first lady Rosalynn looks on, Washington DC, January 20, 1977. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
US President Ronald Reagan (L) is sworn in as 40th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger (R) beside his wife Nancy Reagan (C) during inaugural ceremony, on January 20, 1981 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. At left is vice-president George W. Bush. (Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, DC. 1-20-1989 George H. W. Bush delivers his Inaugural speech from behind the bulletproof podium set up on the steps of the West Front of the US Captial. Bush was inaugurated on January 20, 1989, succeeding Ronald Reagan. He entered office at a period of change in the world; the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Soviet Union came early in his presidency. He ordered military operations in Panama and the Persian Gulf, and, at one point, was recorded as having a record-high a (Photo by Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Washington: President Bush makes his inaugural address at the Capitol after being sworn in as the 41st president of the United States.
President Clinton speaks outside the U.S. Capitol following his inauguration as the 42nd President of the United States. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton (L) is sworn in 20 January 1997 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for his second term as president of the United States by US Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (R) as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (C) and daughter Chelsea (2nd-L) look on. At left rear is US Vice-President Al Gore and at right rear is his wife Tipper Gore. (Photo credit should read TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: INAUGURATION--President George W. Bush delivers his inaugural address. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: George W. Bush is sworn in as the 43rd President of the United States by Chief Justice William Rehnquist on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) walks with Former President George W. Bush (C) on the East Front as Bush departs from the U.S. Capitol after the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States of America on January 20, 2009 in Washington, DC. Obama is the first African-American to be elected to the office of President in the history of the U.S. (Photo by Tannen Maury-Pool/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the US Capitol on January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. US Supreme Court Justice John Roberts (R) administered the oath. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: President Barack Obama waves to onlookers as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term as President of the United States. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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TIGHT SECURITY

The inauguration is expected to draw 800,000 spectators, according to officials. That compares with some 1.8 million attending Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration as America's first black president, one of the largest crowds ever to gather in the U.S. capital for such an event.

Protest organizers said they were concerned with the potential for violent clashes with Trump supporters.

"We are definitely worried about our safety, so we'll be training to help keep people safe," Miller said.

The group will have to navigate tight security provided by three dozen law enforcement agencies, including the Capitol Police, FBI, Secret Service, National Park Service and National Guard.

Security will include more than 3,200 police officers from departments across the country, 8,000 members of the National Guard and an additional 5,000 active-duty military members.

Security costs have exceeded $100 million, officials said.

Last week, interim D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham told reporters that authorities were ready for any attempt to disrupt the festivities.

"The fact that you have some folks that are indicating on social media that they're coming to shut down the inauguration events is something that we will be prepared for," Newsham said.

(Editing by Frank McGurty and Peter Cooney)

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