Women's March on Washington could have more attendees than Donald Trump's inauguration

As the country awaits President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, thousands are preparing to converge at the nation's capital for the Women's March on Washington -- a rally shaping up to be one of the more historic events in recent U.S. history.

The rally's mission is one of unity, bound by the principles of ending violence, reproductive rights, worker's rights, civil rights, LGBTQIA rights, immigrant rights and environmental justice.

"The Women's March on Washington will send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights," the march's mission statement reads. "This march is the first step towards unifying our communities, grounded in new relationships, to create change from the grassroots level up."

SEE ALSO: Gloria Steinem warns of the dangers Trump poses to women's rights

The Women's March is slated to take place one day after Trump's inauguration, on Saturday, Jan. 21. Marchers will gather at 10 a.m. at the intersection of Independence Avenue and 3rd Street SW in Washington D.C., and the day's events will include nationally recognized advocates, artists and entertainers.

In addition to honorary co-chairs Gloria Steinem and Harry Belafonte, America Ferrera, Chelsea Handler, Cher and Katy Perry are among those who have announced their participation in the march.

RELATED: 1913 suffragists crash the Inauguration

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1913 suffragists crash the Inauguration
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1913 suffragists crash the Inauguration

Inez Milholland, one of the leaders of the parade.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Suffrage hikers from around the country assemble in New York for the"suffrage hike" to Washington, D.C.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Suffrage hikers set out on their march to Washington, led by "General" Rosalie Jones (left).

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Suffrage hikers set out on their march to Washington, led by "General" Rosalie Jones (left).

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

The suffrage hikers pass through Newark.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

A cartoon by George Folsom traces the day-to-day route of the suffrage hike.

Photo courtesy of Barnacle press

Grand Marshal Mrs. Richard Coke Burleson leads a mounted brigade in the procession.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Alberta Hill marshals the parade from horseback.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Women dressed as Native Americans join the parade.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Women from foreign countries march in the parade.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Marchers represent their alma maters.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Crowds pack the streets as the march advances.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Hostile crowds flood into the street, blocking the march's progress.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 

Photo Credit: Library of Congress 
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A press release from the Women's March notes "hundreds of thousands of women and their families are expected join the march." As of Wednesday, 1,200 buses had applied for Jan. 21 parking permits at RFK Stadium in Washington D.C. This figure is six times that for Inauguration Day requests, for which some 200 buses have requested permits.

The march's identity -- and that of its national committee -- is one of evolution and inclusion. New York fashion designer Bob Bland reportedly posted on Facebook about the idea of a march one day after Trump's election victory. When she noticed Hawaii retiree Teresa Shook had created a similar event, they joined forces.

SEE ALSO: Washington Post makes embarrassing error in cover story on Women's March on Washington

From there, though, Facebook comments on the event's page called for an inclusion of minority women on the march's leadership team. The national committee now includes Carmen Perez, Tamika D. Mallory and Linda Sarsour -- each a learned activist in her own right who brings a diverse perspective to the march.

As event day nears, reports have emerged of tension among march volunteers and participants -- fueled by contentious dialogues about race. One woman decided to cancel her trip to Washington for the March when a black activist from Brooklyn posted in the Facebook group encouraging "white allies" to "listen more and talk less."

RELATED: Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history

28 PHOTOS
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
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Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
1788: The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, also present are (from left) Alexander Hamilton, Robert R Livingston, Roger Sherman, Mr Otis, Vice President John Adams, Baron Von Steuben and General Henry Knox. Original Artwork: Printed by Currier & Ives. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
United States President Thomas Jefferson tethers his horses to a post before attending his inauguration.
379933 07: A painting depicting the celebration of the Inauguration of President Andrew Jackson in 1829. Jackson was seventh President of the United States. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
The Inauguration of President Polk, 1845. James Knox Polk (1795-1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849. From the Illustrated London News, 19 April 1845. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address - in front of the Washington State House of Representatives. March 1861. AB: Sixteenth President of the United States: 12 February 1809 Â 15 April 1865. Colourised version. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the united states March 4, 1861 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The inauguration of James Buchanan as President, Washington, 1857. James Buchanan (1791-1868) was the fifteenth President of the United States, serving office between 1857 and 1861. He was the only President from Pennsylvania and the only President to never marry. From the Illustrated London News, 28 March 1857. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C. 1865. Photo shows President Lincoln standing in the centre of the photo (below the flag and to the left), on the east front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax taking the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 4th 1869, before a large crowd. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
President McKinley delivering his inaugural address in front of Cleveland. McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He led the nation to victory in the SpanishÂAmerican War and raised protective tariffs to promote American industry. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Franklin D. Roosevelt waving to the crowd in front of the Capitol after making his second inaugural address. (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
United States President Franklin Roosevelt delivering the inaugural address following his election to a fourth term, Washington, DC, 1944. (Photo by Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)
Dwight Eisenhower is inaugurated as President of the United States. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
379933 08: President John Fitzgerald Kennedy making his inaugural address as thirty-fifth president of the United States January 20, 1961. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the thirty-fifth President of the United States on January 20, 1961 in Washington DC. At the first row : US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy (2nd L), US former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (3rd L) and US Vice President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo credit should read SAM SCHULMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Richard Nixon waves from car during inaugural parade. (Photo by John Duprey/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Democrat Jimmy Carter is sworn in by chief justice Earl Burger as the 39th president of the United States while first lady Rosalynn looks on, Washington DC, January 20, 1977. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
US President Ronald Reagan (L) is sworn in as 40th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger (R) beside his wife Nancy Reagan (C) during inaugural ceremony, on January 20, 1981 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. At left is vice-president George W. Bush. (Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, DC. 1-20-1989 George H. W. Bush delivers his Inaugural speech from behind the bulletproof podium set up on the steps of the West Front of the US Captial. Bush was inaugurated on January 20, 1989, succeeding Ronald Reagan. He entered office at a period of change in the world; the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Soviet Union came early in his presidency. He ordered military operations in Panama and the Persian Gulf, and, at one point, was recorded as having a record-high a (Photo by Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Washington: President Bush makes his inaugural address at the Capitol after being sworn in as the 41st president of the United States.
President Clinton speaks outside the U.S. Capitol following his inauguration as the 42nd President of the United States. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton (L) is sworn in 20 January 1997 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for his second term as president of the United States by US Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (R) as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (C) and daughter Chelsea (2nd-L) look on. At left rear is US Vice-President Al Gore and at right rear is his wife Tipper Gore. (Photo credit should read TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: INAUGURATION--President George W. Bush delivers his inaugural address. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: George W. Bush is sworn in as the 43rd President of the United States by Chief Justice William Rehnquist on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) walks with Former President George W. Bush (C) on the East Front as Bush departs from the U.S. Capitol after the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States of America on January 20, 2009 in Washington, DC. Obama is the first African-American to be elected to the office of President in the history of the U.S. (Photo by Tannen Maury-Pool/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the US Capitol on January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. US Supreme Court Justice John Roberts (R) administered the oath. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: President Barack Obama waves to onlookers as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term as President of the United States. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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Interested participants who find themselves unable to hop a bus, train or plane down to Washington are not out of luck. The march's website lists 281 "sister marches" happening locally around the world.

Planned Parenthood, EMILY's List, Amnesty International, OXFAM, Girls Who Code and the Natural Resources Defense Council are among the extensive list of Women's March partners.

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