Circus ties endangered tiger down on a table so people can take selfies

Warning: This post contains a graphic and upsetting video.

Chinese circus trainers have been caught on video tying up a tiger for visitors to sit on and take pictures with.

The video, which has reached over 90,000 videos since it was posted on Chinese video platform iQiyi, shows the tiger first being tied down on a metal table.

Children and adults alike then take turns to sit on its back as they pose for photos.

The video is believed to be filmed at a circus in China's Hunan province, although it is unclear who recorded it.

One segment of the video shows a young child yelling "I'm scared, I'm scared", as his mother places him near the animal.

A trainer is then heard saying "Isn't it cool to sit on a tiger? It can keep you away from the devil and earn you promotions and wealth."

IMAGE: IQIYI

The act of sitting on a tiger is commonly associated with the God of Wealth in China, who is often pictured sitting on the animal.

Chinese netizens were quick to condemn the trainers, with many expressing sympathy for the animal.

"Poor tiger. The human race is too cruel," said one user on iQiyi.

"You can't earn much from this, and instead you've brought so much pain to the animal, do you think it's worth it?," another commented.

"What kind of values are these parents teaching their children?" a netizen asked.

The tiger is believed to be a Siberian tiger, which is on the brink of extinction with only 540 creatures left in the wild.

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Thailand's Tiger Temple remove cats
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Thailand's Tiger Temple remove cats
A sedated tiger is stretchered as officials start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A tourist poses next to a tiger before officials start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A tiger yawns before the officials start moving them from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A Buddhist monk walks past a tiger before officials start moving them from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A sedated tiger is seen in a cage as officials start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Officials prepare weapons with a sedation as they start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Officials try to lead a tiger into a cage as they start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A sedated tiger is stretchered as officials start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A sedated tiger is stretchered as officials start moving tigers from Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple, a popular tourist destination which has come under fire in recent years over the welfare of its big cats in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok, Thailand, May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Thai wildlife officials install a tunnel of cages to capture a tiger and remove it from an enclosure at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand on May 30, 2016. Thai wildlife officials armed with a court order on May 30 resumed the treacherous process of moving tigers from a controversial temple which draws tourists as a petting zoo, but stands accused of selling off the big cats for slaughter. / AFP / CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai wildlife officials load a cage containing a tiger onto a truck after they removed it from an enclosure at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand on May 30, 2016. Thai wildlife officials armed with a court order on May 30 resumed the treacherous process of moving tigers from a controversial temple which draws tourists as a petting zoo, but stands accused of selling off the big cats for slaughter. / AFP / CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A tiger is seen in an enclosure at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand on May 30, 2016. Thai wildlife officials armed with a court order on May 30 resumed the treacherous process of moving tigers from a controversial temple which draws tourists as a petting zoo, but stands accused of selling off the big cats for slaughter. / AFP / CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
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