GOP pumps the brakes on Obamacare repeal, pushes for deadline extension

Facing the realities of the complicated health insurance market, Republican members of Congress have wavered over the past week on a Senate bill to repeal President Barack Obama's healthcare law, pushing instead a strategy of crafting a replacement before going ahead with repeal.

Last Tuesday, Republican Senate leaders introduced a bill that would use the budget reconciliation process to undo significant parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as Obamacare.

On Monday night, however, five GOP Senators — Bob Corker of Tennessee, Rob Portman of Ohio, Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — submitted an amendment to the bill in the Senate that would extend the deadline for the committees to craft a repeal bill from its current January 27 deadline to March 3.

RELATED: The uncertain future of 2017

19 PHOTOS
The uncertain future of 2017
See Gallery
The uncertain future of 2017

RUSSIA'S GROWING INFLUENCE: Russian leader Vladimir Putin looks to position his nation as an alternate ally to countries such as the Philippines and Turkey who have been traditionally allied with the U.S.. Putin's Russia, accused of influencing the U.S. presidential election, could seek to cement their influence by providing support to other populists facing elections this year. REUTERS/Yuri Kochetkov/Pool

Source: Reuters 

SYRIA'S SHAKY PEACE: A truce deal brokered by Russia and Turkey faces challenges as clashes between rebel and government forces continue. A lasting peace deal could prove elusive as the large number of warring factions seek to protect their own interests and territories. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi

Source: Reuters 

ISIS-INSPIRED ATTACKS CONTINUE: Following the highly orchestrated Islamic State attacks on Paris and Brussels, the world has witnessed a spate of attacks by individuals who appear to be inspired by the militant group, rather than in direct contact with them. 2017 looks set to see a continuation of these types of attacks as the year began with a mass shooting at a Turkish nightclub where the motive still remains unclear. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard 

Source: Reuters 

THE TRUMP BARGAIN: As President Trump takes office, the white working class that propelled him to the White House will be watching closely to see if he can bring back jobs as promised throughout the campaign. It remains to be seen if the divisive politics that characterized the bitter campaign will continue as Trump takes over the helm of a divided nation. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Source: Reuters 

MERKEL'S POLITICAL FUTURE IN JEOPARDY: German Chancellor Angela Merkel's support for accepting refugees risks costing her re-election when Germans go to the polls later in 2017. Following the Berlin Christmas market attack and in the run-up to the election, Merkel will continue to face demands to take a much tougher line on immigration and security. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

Source: Reuters 

BREXIT IN REALITY: Britain will have to navigate how and when to trigger article 50 beginning the process to leave the European Union. How the decision affects immigration, trade and British citizens living in the EU member states should become clearer this year. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Source: Reuters 

VENEZUELA CRISIS DEEPENS: The oil-rich but cash-strapped nation faces a dire economic panorama of worsening food and medicine shortages as its socialist system continues to unravel. With few signs of financial relief on the horizon, President Nicolas Maduro faces escalating street protests as patience wears thin even among his supporters. REUTERS/Carlos Eduardo Ramirez

Source: Reuters 

RACE RELATIONS IN FOCUS: With the retrial of former police officer Michael Slager in the shooting death of Walter Scott slated for March, the Black Lives matter movement and other groups protesting racial injustice will be watching for a verdict. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

Source: Reuters 

MIGRANTS ON THE MEDITERRANEAN: As temperatures rise, the number of migrants making the dangerous crossing to Europe could increase again despite a record number of deaths of those traversing the Mediterranean in 2016. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis

Source: Reuters 

PIPELINE DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES: The success of the Standing Rock protesters to halt the Dakota Access pipeline has set a precedent for how environmental groups could disrupt planned pipeline projects. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

Source: Reuters 

CLIMATE CHANGE DISCORD: Top scientists say Trump's vow to pull the United States out of the Paris climate-warming accord would make it far harder to develop strategies to lessen the impact of global warming. Though temperatures in 2017 are expected to dip from the record highs of 2016, how the world views climate change and what to do about it will remain a hot topic. REUTERS/Alister Doyle

Source: Reuters 

RIGHT-WING RISING: France's National Front leader Marine Le Pen will likely compete in a presidential run-off election in May that will test whether her brand of populism resonates in a nation that has been hit with attacks on Paris and Nice. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Source: Reuters 

RAQQA OFFENSIVE ESCALATES: An operation by a U.S.-backed alliance of Syrian armed groups' to retake the northern city of Raqqa, the de facto capital of Islamic State in Syria, looks set to continue in tandem with the offensive on the militant group's Iraq stronghold of Mosul. Trump's campaign promise of a secret plan to fight Islamic State will be forced into the spotlight. REUTERS/Rodi Said

Source: Reuters 

THE DOW'S CLIMB: U.S. stocks saw solid gains in 2016, buoyed by a post-election rally that fueled the Dow Jones Industrial Average to approach 20,000 points but whether the rally will contine in 2017 is up for debate. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Source: Reuters 

A NEW ARMS RACE: With both Putin and Trump planning to modernize their nation's nuclear arsenal, the prospect of a looming arms race is back on the table. When asked to clarify a tweet on nuclear capabilities, Trump said "Let it be an arms race. We will outmatch them at every pass and outlast them all." REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Source: Reuters 

DROUGHT THREATENS FAMINE: Charities have repeatedly warned about the threat of renewed famine as Somalia continues to be plagued by poor rains and conflict, as well as shortages of aid. REUTERS/Feisal Omar

Source: Reuters 

TURKEY'S MEDIA CRACKDOWN: Turkey now imprisons more journalists than any other nation following a crackdown in the wake of the nation's coup attempt, according to the CPJ. The extent of the crackdown has worried rights groups and many of Turkey's Western allies, who fear President Erdogan is using the emergency rule to eradicate dissent. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

Source: Reuters 

SNAPCHAT DEBUT: Snapchat filed for an initial public offering in 2016 putting the messaging app a step closer to the biggest U.S. stock market debut since 2014. The Venice, California-based company could go public as soon as March and be valued at $20 billion to $25 billion, making it the largest IPO since Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Source: Reuters 

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"By extending the deadline for budget reconciliation instructions until March, Congress and the incoming administration will each have additional time to get the policy right," Corker said in a statement on Monday night.

"Repealing President Obama's health care law and replacing it with a responsible alternative is a top priority, and by exercising due diligence we can create a stable transition to an open healthcare marketplace that provides far greater choice and more affordable plans for the American people," he added.

Corker also emphasized that President-elect Donald Trump has said "repeal and replace should take place simultaneously."

Other GOP senators have expressed a desire to make sure there is a replacement plan in place before repeal is triggered. Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas told MSNBC last week that he also had reservations on repealing the law without a replacement ready to go.

"It would not be the right path for us to repeal Obamacare without laying out a path forward," Cotton said.

Sen. Lamar Alexander also has said the GOP has to "consider what it would take to create a new and better alternative and then begin to create that alternative" before repealing the ACA.

Given the slight majority of Republicans in the Senate and the unwillingness of Democrats to help tearing down Obama's signature legislative achievement, even a few defections from the Republican Party would cause a repeal bill to fail on a vote.

It also appears that the Trump administration is working with congressional leaders to lay out a plan to replace the bill before any repeal happens.

The Associated Press' Erica Werner reported that top Trump advisers Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner, along with incoming chief of staff Reince Priebus and Treasury Secretary-designate Steven Mnuchin all met with House Speaker Paul Ryan for two hours on Monday night. At the conclusion of the meeting, Bannon told reporters the group was "still thinking that through" in regard to the Obamacare repeal and replacement.

Simultaneously, Sen. Rand Paul has been gathering support over the past week to delay any repeal of Obamacare until the GOP has a full replacement bill ready to go. Paul has cited concerns over a possible increase in the deficit due to a repeal and has tweeted that Trump supports his call for a replacement on the same day as repeal.

Concerns have been raised over the past week by Republican leaders that any repeal without a replacement may lead to a disruption for those people in the individual marketplaces — that is, those not getting their insurance through their employer or a government program like Medicaid or Medicare.

Given that more than 23 million people gained healthcare coverage through various provisions of the ACA, GOP leaders appear to want to ensure that there is no gap in their care, given the political and practical complications.

Additionally, health policy experts have expressed concerns that the possibility of repeal with no clear replacement could lead to insurers pulling out of the individual marketplace at a faster pace, leaving fewer choices and potentially causing price increases that would make current premium hikes look small by comparison.

The move would also be politically unpopular. A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan healthcare-focused think tank, found that just 20% of Americans want Obamacare repealed even if there is no replacement. Another 28% want a repeal if there is a replacement plan ready, while 47% do not want a repeal at all.

Former Republican House Speaker and Trump confidant Newt Gingrich told Fox News on Monday night that Republicans are worried about a possible loss of coverage for some Americans.

RELATED: The contentious history of the Affordable Care Act

51 PHOTOS
Obamacare
See Gallery
Obamacare
UNITED STATES - MARCH 23: Pro-choice demonstrators including Stephanie Castro, right, and Sandra Sanchez of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, appear outside of the Supreme Court as arguments were heard in a case which religious organizations are challenging the Affordable Care Act's provision that requires employers to cover birth control in health care plans, March 23, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
US President Barack Obama greets attendees after speakin on the Affordable Care Act at the United Community Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 3, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators opposed to U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law, Obamacare, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators opposed to U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law, Obamacare, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Representative Steve King, a Republican from Iowa, speaks at the Tea Party Patriots podium in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Pamela Hurst, center, speaks to the media as her husband Douglas Hurst, a plaintiff in King v. Burwell, right, looks on in front of the U.S. Supreme Court with Michael Carvin, lead attorney for the petitioners and partner at Jones Day, left, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Kathleen Sebelius, former secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), center, speaks to members of the media in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrator Donna Hurlock, a medical doctor from Virginia opposed to U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law, Obamacare, holds a 'No Obamacare' umbrella in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - MARCH 04: Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, speaks at a rally outside of the Supreme Court during arguments in the King v. Burwell case which deals with tax credits in the Affordable Care Act, March 4, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 04: Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, speaks at a rally outside of the Supreme Court during arguments in the King v. Burwell case which deals with tax credits in the Affordable Care Act, March 4, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Demonstrator Nell Robinson, a medical student from George Washington University, holds a sign in favor of to U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law, Obamacare, in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrator Elodie Huttner holds a sign in support of U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law, Obamacare, in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. A U.S. Supreme Court argument over Obamacare's tax subsidies divided the justices along ideological lines, potentially leaving two pivotal justices to decide the law's fate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
This image taken March 31, 2014 in Washington, DC shows the home page for the HealthCare.gov internet site. Today is the deadline day for uninsured Americans to sign up for coverage through US President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, the Affordable Care Act. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 16: Nicholas Diebel, 14, son of Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, sits at the dais before a House Rules Committee hearing in the Capitol, July 16, 2014, on the constitutionality of a House Republican led lawsuit against President Obama for allegedly overstepping his authority with certain provisions in his health care law. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 10: From left, Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin, D-Ill., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., conduct a news conference in the Capitol's Senate studio, July 10, 2014, on legislation regarding the Supreme Court decision to allow employers to opt out of the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 10: Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., conducts a news conference in the Capitol's Senate studio, July 10, 2014, on legislation regarding the Supreme Court decision to allow employers to opt out of the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Activists opposed the Affordable Care Act's employer contraceptive mandate celebrate outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, June 30, 2014. The Supreme Court dealt a blow to President Barack Obama's health-care law, ruling that closely held companies can claim a religious exemption from the requirement that they offer birth-control coverage in their worker health plans. (Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Activists who support the Affordable Care Act's employer contraceptive mandate hold signs outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, June 30, 2014. The Supreme Court dealt a blow to President Barack Obama's health-care law, ruling that closely held companies can claim a religious exemption from the requirement that they offer birth-control coverage in their worker health plans. (Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Activists who support the Affordable Care Act's employer contraceptive mandate demonstrate outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, June 30, 2014. The Supreme Court dealt a blow to President Barack Obama's health-care law, ruling that closely held companies can claim a religious exemption from the requirement that they offer birth-control coverage in their worker health plans. (Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Anti-abortion demonstrators hold signs during a Priests for Life protest outside the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit Court as the Court hears the oral arguments in the 'Priests for Life v. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)' case in Washington, DC, on May 8, 2014. The case centers around the HHS mandate in the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, that religious organizations must cover contraceptions and abortion as part of their health insurance benefits, even if that goes against the organization's religious beliefs. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Anti-abortion demonstrators hold signs during a Priests for Life protest outside the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit Court as the Court hears the oral arguments in the 'Priests for Life v. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)' case in Washington, DC, on May 8, 2014. The case centers around the HHS mandate in the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, that religious organizations must cover contraceptions and abortion as part of their health insurance benefits, even if that goes against the organization's religious beliefs. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, FL - APRIL 15: Felue Chang who is newly insured under an insurance plan through the Affordable Care Act receives a checkup from Dr. Peria Del Pino-White at the South Broward Community Health Services clinic on April 15, 2014 in Hollywood, Florida. A report released by the Congressional Budget Office indicates that the Affordable Care Act will cost $5 billion less than originally projected for 2014. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, with Vice President Joe Biden (R) in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on April 1, 2014. Hundreds of thousands of Americans rushed to buy Obama's new health insurance plans on March 31, prompting a victory lap from a White House that paid a steep political price for its greatest achievement. The scramble to sign up under Obama's health care law at the end of a six-month enrollment window caused website glitches and long lines at on-the-spot enrollment centers. AFP PHOTO/Nicholas KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 31: Norma Licciardello sits with an agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as they wait for the Affordable Care Act website to come back on line as she tries to purchases a health insurance plan at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 31: Norma Licciardello sits with an agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as they wait for the Affordable Care Act website to come back on line as she tries to purchases a health insurance plan at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 31: Jose Villanueva (L) and Doraisy Avila sit with an agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as they look at a pricing plan available from the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 31: People stand in the line to register to meet with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors that are selling insurance under the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 31: Andres Cuartas (L) sits with Mercedes Mujica an agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as he purchases a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
This image taken March 31, 2014 in Washington, DC shows the home page for the White House site indicating the amount of time remaining before open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act closes. Today is the deadline day for uninsured Americans to sign up for coverage through US President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, the Affordable Care Act. AFP PHOTO / Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A Choose Health Delaware sign stands outside an Affordable Care Act enrollment event in Milford, Delaware, U.S., on Thursday, March 27, 2014. Six million Americans have signed up for private health plans under Obamacare, President Barack Obama said, a symbolic milestone for a government that has struggled to get the law off the ground. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Marketplace guide Jim Prim works on the Healthcare.gov federal enrollment website as he helps a resident sign up for a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act at an enrollment event in Milford, Delaware, U.S., on Thursday, March 27, 2014. Six million Americans have signed up for private health plans under Obamacare, President Barack Obama said, a symbolic milestone for a government that has struggled to get the law off the ground. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Health Insurance Marketplace application checklist hangs at a Westside Family Healthcare center during an Affordable Care Act enrollment event in Bear, Delaware, U.S., on Thursday, March 27, 2014. Six million Americans have signed up for private health plans under Obamacare, President Barack Obama said, a symbolic milestone for a government that has struggled to get the law off the ground. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Certified application counselor Tina Gaffney helps a resident create an account for a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act at a Westside Family Healthcare center enrollment event in Bear, Delaware, U.S., on Thursday, March 27, 2014. Six million Americans have signed up for private health plans under Obamacare, President Barack Obama said, a symbolic milestone for a government that has struggled to get the law off the ground. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Marketplace guide Stephanie Cantres helps a resident sign up for a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act at a Westside Family Healthcare center enrollment event in Bear, Delaware, U.S., on Thursday, March 27, 2014. Six million Americans have signed up for private health plans under Obamacare, President Barack Obama said, a symbolic milestone for a government that has struggled to get the law off the ground. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 20: Raquel Martinez, Maria Celia Escalona, Flora Motell and Armando Mesa (L-R) wait for their names to be called to speak with an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as they and others try to purchase health insurance under the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 20, 2014 in Miami, Florida. The owner of Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, Odalys Arevalo, said she has seen a surge in people, some waiting up to 3 hours or more in line, trying to sign up for the Affordable Care Act before the open enrollment period for individual insurance ends on March 31. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - FEBRUARY 13: Hisham Uadadeh walks out of Leading Insurance Agency after enrolling in a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act on February 13, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Numbers released by the government showed that about 3.3 million people signed up for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act through the end of January. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - FEBRUARY 13: Hisham Uadadeh enrolls in a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act with the help of A. Michael Khoury at Leading Insurance Agency on February 13, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Numbers released by the government showed that about 3.3 million people signed up for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act through the end of January. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
US Representative Greg Walden, Republican of Oregon and chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, speaks during a press conference about healthcare and the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, at the Republican National Committee in Washington, DC, January 28, 2014. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
JACKSON, KY - JANUARY, 22: Dr. Derrick Hamilton listens to Breathitt County resident Mary Blair's heartbeat during her appointment at the Breathitt County Family Health Center on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 in Jackson, Ky. Despite suffering from a past heart attack and diabetes Blair was able to receive medical coverage through Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Luke Sharrett/For The Washington Post via Getty Images) Obamacare Affordable Care Act Healthcare Breathitt County
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 20: Supporters of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) march in the 29th annual Kingdom Day Parade on January 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. The Kingdom Day Parade honors the memory of African-American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. and coincides with Martin Luther King Day. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 15: As people stand in line to speak with an insurance agent Dailem Delombard sits with an agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as she tries to purchase health insurance under the Affordable Care Act at the kiosk setup at the Mall of Americas on January 15, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is deadline day for those that want insurance to start on February the 1st. According to the owner of Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, Odalys Arevalo, their business selling insurance under the Affordable Care Act has exploded so much so that by the end of the week they will be moving to a 24,000 square foot space at the mall because they have outgrown the kiosk. They have over 25 agents and are seeing hundreds of people daily, last Saturday they saw about 1,000 people with wait times of over 5 hours. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A woman holding a sign in support of the Affordable Care Act is seen as US President Barack Obama's motorcade returns to his vacation compound from the gym at Marine Corps Base Hawaii on December 29, 2013 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. The first family is in Hawaii for their annual holiday vacation. AFP PHOTO / Kent NISHIMURA (Photo credit should read Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images)
Fliers promoting the Get Covered Illinois health insurance marketplace sit in a box at the Bureau County Health Department offices in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Todays deadline for Americans to sign up for Obamacare health coverage effective Jan. 1 was extended until midnight tomorrow as heavy traffic to the online enrollment system caused a queuing system to be activated Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Samantha Guzman, an Affordable Care Act navigator with the Bureau and Putnam County Health Department, center, assists Jackie Karns as she shops for health insurance at the Bureau County Health Department offices in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Todays deadline for Americans to sign up for Obamacare health coverage effective Jan. 1 was extended until midnight tomorrow as heavy traffic to the online enrollment system caused a queuing system to be activated Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MIAMI, FL - DECEMBER 11: Susana Hernandez (L) speaks with Rosaly Hernandez, an insurance agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, about purchasing insurance under the Affordable Care Act at a kiosk setup at the Mall of Americas on December 11, 2013 in Miami, Florida. As Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius tesified in Washington, DC before a congressional panel that the Affordable Care Act website was improving, the Sunshine Life and Health Advisors said, that they are starting to see a steady increase in the numbers of people coming to them to purchase and understand the policies offered under the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Enrollee Douglas Sparks waits to speak to a health navigator at a health insurance education and enrollment event in Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013. Government-run health insurance exchanges are at the core of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 known as Obamacare that seeks to provide access to health coverage for many of the country's estimated 48 million uninsured. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Copies of the application for the Health Insurance Marketplace from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are arranged for a in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Dec. 6, 2013. The health-care website's improved performance has both U.S. political parties shifting strategies, with President Barack Obama's team preparing a January advertising blitz and a wave of celebrity promotions to boost enrollment, allies said. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An affordable health coverage sign stands a health insurance education and enrollment event in Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013. Government-run health insurance exchanges are at the core of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 known as Obamacare that seeks to provide access to health coverage for many of the country's estimated 48 million uninsured. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIALEAH, FL - NOVEMBER 14: Venita Mendez works with Gisselle Rubio, an insurance agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, as she looks to purchase an insurance policy under the Affordable Care Act at the store setup in the Westland Mall on November 14, 2013 in Hialeah, Florida. As the insurance agents continue to help people purchase and understand the policies offered under the Affordable Care Act, U.S. President Barack Obama announced that Americans who have had their health insurance plans canceled because of the Affordable Care Act can keep those plans for another year if they wish to. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
The Healthcare.gov website is displayed on a laptop computer arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Nov. 4, 2013. The race to construct an online insurance exchange by Oct. 1 spurred the Obama administration to use an expedited bidding system that limited its choice of a builder to just four companies, including CGI Group Inc. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"I don't think Republicans want to have 23 million people out there worried that they're going to lose their insurance," Gingrich said.

GOP senators such as John McCain of Arizona have also expressed reservations about possible coverage lapses. Collins, a sponsor of the amendment to delay the repeal, said in a statement Monday night that avoiding coverage lapses is a key part of the reason Republicans should delay.

"Repeal and replacement is a complicated task, and my number one concern is that we not create a gap in coverage for individuals who are currently insured and who rely on that coverage," Collins said in the statement announcing the amendment.

And Democrats appear to be unwilling to help kill Obamacare. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer previously told the Washington Post that Democrats "will not then step up to the plate and come up with a half-baked solution that we will partially own."

In a meeting with Democrats on Capitol Hill last week, Obama told members not to "rescue" Republicans with a replacement bill and to call any changes to the ACA "Trumpcare."

As for the current administrators of the law, it appears the administration will go full steam ahead with the current open enrollment period until Trump takes office.

As of the end of 2016, 8.8 million people had signed up for plans through Obamacare according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Additionally, Obama, HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell, and Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services chief Andy Slavitt have been on a public-relations blitz to defend the growth of the law and its positive impact on patients and Americans before Trump is inaugurated next week.

NOW WATCH: These are Stratfor's chilling predictions for 2017

More from Business Insider:

SEE ALSO: The battle lines are being drawn in the fight over Obamacare

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.