Smoking costs $1 trillion, soon to kill 8 million a year: study

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

GENEVA (Reuters) - Smoking costs the global economy more than $1 trillion a year, and will kill one third more people by 2030 than it does now, according to a study by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Cancer Institute published on Tuesday.

That cost far outweighs global revenues from tobacco taxes, which the WHO estimated at about $269 billion in 2013-2014.

"The number of tobacco-related deaths is projected to increase from about 6 million deaths annually to about 8 million annually by 2030, with more than 80 percent of these occurring in LMICs (low- and middle-income countries)," the study said.

Around 80 percent of smokers live in such countries, and although smoking prevalence was falling among the global population, the total number of smokers worldwide is rising, it said.

Health experts say tobacco use is the single biggest preventable cause of death globally.

"It is responsible for... likely over $1 trillion in health care costs and lost productivity each year," said the study, peer-reviewed by more than 70 scientific experts.

12 PHOTOS
Graphic images raise awareness about the health risks of smoking
See Gallery
Graphic images raise awareness about the health risks of smoking

A tobacconist dispalys new cigarette packs, plain with unbranded packaging and the health warnings, "Smoking causes nine out of ten lung cancers" (L) and "Smoking harms your lungs" (R) as part of anti-smoking legislation in a French 'Tabac' in Paris, France, January 2, 2017.

(REUTERS/Charles Platiau)

A tobacconist, wearing a mask, displays images which will be used for cigarette packaging during a protest in a French 'Tabac' in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France, September 8, 2015. France's tobacconists are protesting plans to force cigarette companies to use plain, unbranded packaging, as part of anti-smoking legislation. Slogans read "smoking causes blindness, smoking causes peripheral vascular disease, smoking causes cancer".

(REUTERS/Eric Gaillard)

A high school student looks at a mock up of plain cigarette packaging before the start of a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 31, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Packs of small cigars are displayed for sale by a tobacconist with health warnings as part of anti-smoking legislation in a French 'Tabac' in Paris, France, January 2, 2017.

(REUTERS/Charles Platiau)

A high school student looks at a mock up of plain cigarette packaging before the start of a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 31, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

A tobacconist sells plain cigarette packs on October 12, 2016 in Ajaccio, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica.

(PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mock-ups of plain cigarette packaging are seen before the start of a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 31, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Cigarette packs are seen on shelves in a tobacco shop in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France, September 8, 2015. France's tobacconists are protesting plans to force cigarette companies to use plain, unbranded packaging, as part of anti-smoking legislation.

(REUTERS/Eric Gaillard)

High school students look at a mock up of plain cigarette packaging before the start of a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 31, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

A picture taken on October 12, 2016 in Ajaccio shows cigarettes bound in neutral packaging. The first cigarettes bound in neutral packaging, with no logo's or branding but bearing graphic images of the potential health risks of smoking arrived at tobacconists across France on October 10, 2016.

(PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP/Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The economic costs are expected to continue to rise, and although governments have the tools to reduce tobacco use and associated deaths, most have fallen far short of using those tools effectively, said the 688-page report.

"Government fears that tobacco control will have an adverse economic impact are not justified by the evidence. The science is clear; the time for action is now."

HOW TO QUIT

Cheap and effective policies included hiking tobacco taxes and prices, comprehensive smoke-free policies, complete bans on tobacco company marketing, and prominent pictorial warning labels.

Tobacco taxes could also be used to fund more expensive interventions such as anti-tobacco mass media campaigns and support for cessation services and treatments, it said.

Governments spent less than $1 billion on tobacco control in 2013-2014, according to a WHO estimate.

Tobacco regulation meanwhile is reaching a crunch point because of a trade dispute brought by Cuba, Indonesia, Honduras and Dominican Republic against Australia's stringent "plain packaging" laws, which enforce standardized designs on tobacco products and ban distinctive logos and colorful branding.

The World Trade Organization is expected to rule on the complaint this year. Australia's policy is being closely watched by other countries that are considering similar policies, including Norway, Slovenia, Canada, Singapore, Belgium and South Africa, the study said.

(Reporting by Tom Miles Editing by Jeremy Gaunt.)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners