'Heartbroken' legendary inauguration announcer Charlie Brotman was suddenly replaced for Trump's big day

Charlie Brotman has announced every inaugural parade since Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1957, but was suddenly notified that he will not be needed for President-elect Donald Trump's swearing in on Jan. 20.

Brotman, 89, learned about the change in an email and said he was "heartbroken" to be relieved of his long-held duty. He said he had already been preparing to usher in the 45th President of the United States.

"I've been doing this for 60 years," he said, according to WJLA. "At first ... I was destroyed."

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Presidential Inaugural Committee Director of Communications Boris Epshteyn released a statement that said only:

"Since 1957, millions of Americans and countless entertainers have come to recognize Charlie Brotman as the voice of the inaugural parade. The Presidential Inaugural Committee will be proud to honor Charlie as Announcer Chairman Emeritus on January 20th. We are thrilled for Steve Ray to be introducing a new generation of Americans to the grand traditions of the inaugural parade."

"I'm not replacing Charlie. I'm not filling his shoes," said Ray, a Washington D.C.-based freelance announcer, audio engineer and producer, who has done promotional segments for the Washington Nationals. "I'm really just the guy who's next, because Charlie is irreplaceable. He's an absolute legend."

Brotman said he has not been told why a change was made, but suspects it is because Ray supported Trump's campaign and that Trump is rewarding loyalty. Being a good sport, he wished Ray the best of luck.

"I want [Ray] to do good, as opposed to, boy, I hope he fouls up so they say, 'We want Charlie back.' No. I don't want that at all," Brotman said. "I'm saying, 'You know what? Good luck, young man. I hope you do spectacular.'"

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Brotman has been offered a VIP seat and special recognition during the event, but said he is not yet sure if he will attend. He said he is weighing whether to accept the role of "Announcer Chairman Emeritus" or accept one of several options and offers from multiple media outlets and networks.

"Two more just came in today," Brotman told WJLA.

Perhaps it's one reason why he seems to be feeling a bit better about the situation.

"And I'm thinking, you know what, Charlie Brotman?" he said. "You are one lucky son of a gun!"

RELATED: See photos from inaugurations past:

28 PHOTOS
Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
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Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
1788: The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, also present are (from left) Alexander Hamilton, Robert R Livingston, Roger Sherman, Mr Otis, Vice President John Adams, Baron Von Steuben and General Henry Knox. Original Artwork: Printed by Currier & Ives. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
United States President Thomas Jefferson tethers his horses to a post before attending his inauguration.
379933 07: A painting depicting the celebration of the Inauguration of President Andrew Jackson in 1829. Jackson was seventh President of the United States. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
The Inauguration of President Polk, 1845. James Knox Polk (1795-1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849. From the Illustrated London News, 19 April 1845. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address - in front of the Washington State House of Representatives. March 1861. AB: Sixteenth President of the United States: 12 February 1809 Â 15 April 1865. Colourised version. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the united states March 4, 1861 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The inauguration of James Buchanan as President, Washington, 1857. James Buchanan (1791-1868) was the fifteenth President of the United States, serving office between 1857 and 1861. He was the only President from Pennsylvania and the only President to never marry. From the Illustrated London News, 28 March 1857. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C. 1865. Photo shows President Lincoln standing in the centre of the photo (below the flag and to the left), on the east front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax taking the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 4th 1869, before a large crowd. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
President McKinley delivering his inaugural address in front of Cleveland. McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He led the nation to victory in the SpanishÂAmerican War and raised protective tariffs to promote American industry. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Franklin D. Roosevelt waving to the crowd in front of the Capitol after making his second inaugural address. (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
United States President Franklin Roosevelt delivering the inaugural address following his election to a fourth term, Washington, DC, 1944. (Photo by Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)
Dwight Eisenhower is inaugurated as President of the United States. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
379933 08: President John Fitzgerald Kennedy making his inaugural address as thirty-fifth president of the United States January 20, 1961. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the thirty-fifth President of the United States on January 20, 1961 in Washington DC. At the first row : US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy (2nd L), US former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (3rd L) and US Vice President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo credit should read SAM SCHULMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Richard Nixon waves from car during inaugural parade. (Photo by John Duprey/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Democrat Jimmy Carter is sworn in by chief justice Earl Burger as the 39th president of the United States while first lady Rosalynn looks on, Washington DC, January 20, 1977. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
US President Ronald Reagan (L) is sworn in as 40th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger (R) beside his wife Nancy Reagan (C) during inaugural ceremony, on January 20, 1981 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. At left is vice-president George W. Bush. (Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, DC. 1-20-1989 George H. W. Bush delivers his Inaugural speech from behind the bulletproof podium set up on the steps of the West Front of the US Captial. Bush was inaugurated on January 20, 1989, succeeding Ronald Reagan. He entered office at a period of change in the world; the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Soviet Union came early in his presidency. He ordered military operations in Panama and the Persian Gulf, and, at one point, was recorded as having a record-high a (Photo by Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Washington: President Bush makes his inaugural address at the Capitol after being sworn in as the 41st president of the United States.
President Clinton speaks outside the U.S. Capitol following his inauguration as the 42nd President of the United States. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton (L) is sworn in 20 January 1997 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for his second term as president of the United States by US Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (R) as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (C) and daughter Chelsea (2nd-L) look on. At left rear is US Vice-President Al Gore and at right rear is his wife Tipper Gore. (Photo credit should read TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: INAUGURATION--President George W. Bush delivers his inaugural address. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: George W. Bush is sworn in as the 43rd President of the United States by Chief Justice William Rehnquist on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) walks with Former President George W. Bush (C) on the East Front as Bush departs from the U.S. Capitol after the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States of America on January 20, 2009 in Washington, DC. Obama is the first African-American to be elected to the office of President in the history of the U.S. (Photo by Tannen Maury-Pool/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the US Capitol on January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. US Supreme Court Justice John Roberts (R) administered the oath. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: President Barack Obama waves to onlookers as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term as President of the United States. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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