Hitler's manifesto 'Mein Kampf' tops Germany's bestseller list

According to the Washington Post, the recently published annotated version of Adolf Hitler's manifesto 'Mein Kampf' has sold about 85,000 copies in its first year despite an initial run of only 4,000.

USA Today notes, "Mein Kampf — the title means 'My Struggle' in English — was published in two volumes in 1925-1926. Written while Hitler was in prison, it features autobiographical information about his youth and explains his antisemitic and extremist views."

For decades, the book had been banned from being reprinted due to fears it could help to spread Nazi ideology, but just over a year ago, the copyright restrictions expired, notes CNN.

In response, Germany's Institute of Contemporary History decided to issue the annotated version with around 3,500 notes to provide critical context to the work.

The New York Times quotes Andreas Wirsching, an official with the institute, as saying, "We are very happy that the ambitious bridge between fundamental academic work and historical-political explanation appears to have succeeded."

Despite being a German bestseller, some Jewish organizations have spoken out against reprinting the book at all.

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'Hitler Art' collection and photo albums
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'Hitler Art' collection and photo albums
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - May 8: Harry Ettlinger, one of only six living Monuments Men, stands next to a photograph of him taking a painting by Rembrandt from a salt mine in Germany. The National Archives holds a press conference to unveil the last known leather-bound 'Hitler Album' of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war on May 8, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Paul Gerbi, 92, WWII veteran who fought with General Leclerc's 2nd Armoured Division (Division Blindee), presents on November 22, 2013 in La Roche-sur-Yon, western France, four photo albums which belonged to German dictator Adolf Hitler that he brought back from Berchtesgaden in 1945. The books will be auctioned today. AFP PHOTO/FRANK PERRY (Photo credit should read FRANK PERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Paul Gerbi, 92, WWII veteran who fought with General Leclerc's 2nd Armoured Division (Division Blindee), presents on November 22, 2013 in La Roche-sur-Yon, western France, four photo albums which belonged to German dictator Adolf Hitler that he brought back from Berchtesgaden in 1945. The books will be auctioned today. AFP PHOTO/FRANK PERRY (Photo credit should read FRANK PERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 22: A curator turns pages in the Gemaldegalerie Linz Album XIII, which American World War II veteran John Pistone brought home from Germany at the end of the war and kept for 65 years, before returning it to the people of Germany during a ceremony at the State Department January 22, 2010 in Washington, DC. The album is one of 31 that contained exquisite photographs of the items selected by Adolf Hitler to be included in the 'Fuhrermuseum,' an unrealized museum complex for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel stands with a photograph of US Soldiers in World War II removing looted paintings by the Nazis from a castle after announcing that he would donate two recently discovered albums depicting art that was looted by the Nazis at the National Archives in Washington, DC, 01 November 2007. Weinstein said the discovery is 'one of the most significant finds related to Hitler's premeditated theft of art and other cultural treasures to be found since the Nuremberg Trials.' AFP PHOTO/SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 22: American World War II veteran John Pistone looks through the Gemaldegalerie Linz Album XIII, which he brought home from Germany at the end of the war and kept for 65 years, before returning it to the people of Germany during a ceremony at the State Department January 22, 2010 in Washington, DC. The album is one of 31 that contained exquisite photographs of the items selected by Adolf Hitler to be included in the 'Fuhrermuseum,' an unrealized museum complex for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY ZACHARY SLOBIG 'US-GERMANY-HISTORY-WAR' This picture taken 09 November 2007 shows a photograph in John Barsamian's World War II photo album of him standing inside Adolf Hitler's residence at Berchtesgaden where he found Hitler's globe as a young US Army officer 10 May 1945. Barsamian now plans to auction off the curious piece of war memorabilia which is expected to attract bids of 15,000 to 20,000 USD when it is auctioned 13 November in San Francisco. AFP PHOTO/Tony AVELAR (Photo credit should read TONY AVELAR/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 22: A curator turns pages in the 'Augsburger Geschlechterbuch,' (L) a book taken from Germany by a U.S. Army Captain at the end of World War II, before its return to the people of Germany during a ceremony at the State Department January 22, 2010 in Washington, DC. Valued at $600,000, the book is a 16th-century bound volume of drawings and prints showing prominent families of Augsburg in different costumes and situations. Also returned to Germany was the Gemaldegalerie Linz Album XIII (R), one of 31 that contained exquisite photographs of the items selected by Adolf Hitler to be included in the 'Fuhrermuseum,' an unrealized museum complex for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 29: Robert Edsel donated this Hitler album of looted art which is on display at the National Archives Wednesday January 29, 2014 in Washington, DC. Edsel, author of Monuments Men, the book about the WWII men and women who hunted for Nazi looted art in a race against time across Europe which is now a movie starring George Clooney, will speak at the National Archives as part of the public programs panel discussion Feb. 19. (Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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