Republicans propose a constitutional amendment for congressional term limits

Two Republicans –– Sen. Ted Cruz and Rep. Ron DeSantis –– proposed a constitutional amendment Wednesday that would dramatically reduce term limits for members of Congress.

Under their proposal, U.S. senators would be limited to two terms, and representatives would be limited to three.

Related: Ted Cruz through the years

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Ted Cruz through the years, with family
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Ted Cruz through the years, with family
UNITED STATES - MARCH 21: Ted Cruz (R) Texas (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call)
U.S. Senate candidate Ted Cruz arrives for a luncheon near the state Republican convention, Friday, June 8, 2012, in Fort Worth, Texas. (Ron T. Ennis/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT via Getty Images)
U.S. Senate candidate candidate Ted Cruz and his wife, Heidi, wave to delegates after he spoke on the final day of the state Republican convention at the FWCC on Saturday, June 9, 2012, in Fort Worth, Texas. (Ron T. Ennis/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT via Getty Images)
U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas, speaks at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. Cruz was scheduled to speak on the scope of treaty power in the U.S. Constitution. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LYNCHBURG, VA - MARCH 23: Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) stands on stage his his daughter, Catherine Cruz, 4, left, his wife, Heidi Cruz, and his older sister, Caroline Cruz, 6, right, after he made a speech announcing his candidacy for a presidential bid at Liberty University on Monday March 23, 2015 in Lynchburg, VA.(Photo by Matt McClain/ The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Ted Cruz sits on the edge of the stage with his young daughter Catherine during a commercial break at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Republican presidential candidate Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX ) and his family acknowledge the crowd at Faith Baptist Bible College in Ankeny, Iowa, January 23, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz (R-TX) appears with his daughters Caroline and Catherine at a campaign event at Zaharakos Ice Cream Shop in Columbus, Indiana, U.S., April 25, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas and former 2016 presidential candidate, takes the stage with his family during the 2016 Texas Republican Convention in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Saturday, May 14, 2016. Paul Ryan made clear Thursday that he is sticking with his extraordinary gambit that he isn't ready to support the Republican nominee for president unless Donald Trump can demonstrate that he's Republican enough. Photographer: Laura Buckman/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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That'd make for a 12-year limit for U.S. senators and a six-year limit for U.S. representatives.

The proposal ties into the "drain the swamp" message President-elect Donald Trump preached during his campaign.

MORE from Newsy: GOP Moves To Defund Obamacare; Democrats Can't Block It

In October, a Rasmussen poll found 74 percent of voters favored term limits. And in November, roughly 60 new members were voted into Congress.

Cruz said in a press release, "D.C. is broken. The American people resoundingly agreed on Election Day."

But the question is if members of Congress agree. Even powerful Republicans, like Sen. Mitch McConnell, have argued if members of Congress can keep winning elections, it should be their right to.

A lot of famous faces would be out of a job if Cruz and DeSantis' proposal is enacted. McConnell's been in Congress since 1985. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has been a representative for roughly 30 years.

But looking at Congress as a whole, the proposed term limits may not change much. The average senator serves 10 years, and the average representative serves nine.

Related: Top most and least liked U.S. Senators in 2016

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Top most and least liked U.S. Senators
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Top most and least liked U.S. Senators
Least Liked

10. Richard Durbin, Illinois

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 41%
No opinion: 21%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Least Liked

9. Claire McCaskill, Missouri

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 46%
No opinion: 16%

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Least Liked

8. Joe Manchin, West Virginia

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 54%
No opinion: 7%

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Least Liked

7. David Vitter, Louisiana

Disapprove: 39% 
Approve: 42%
No opinion: 20%

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Least Liked

6. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina

Disapprove: 40% 
Approve: 45%
No opinion: 16%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Least Liked

5. Marco Rubio, Florida

Disapprove: 41% 
Approve: 46%
No opinion: 13%

(Photo credit MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Least Liked

4. John McCain, Arizona

Disapprove: 42% 
Approve: 48%
No opinion: 9%

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Least Liked

2. Harry Reid, Nevada

Disapprove: 43% 
Approve: 44%
No opinion: 17%

(Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Most Liked

10. Amy Klobuchar, Minnesota

Approve: 63%
Disapprove: 24%
No opinion: 13%

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Most Liked

9. Angus King, Maine

Approve: 63%
Disapprove: 26%
No opinion: 11%

(Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Most Liked

3. John Thune, South Dakota

Approve: 68%
Disapprove: 17%
No opinion: 15%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Most Liked

2. Susan Collins, Maine

Approve: 69%
Disapprove: 21%
No opinion: 11%

(Photo by John Patriquin/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Most Liked

1. Bernie Sanders, Vermont

Approve: 87%
Disapprove: 12%
No opinion: 1%

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

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