WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he is certain hacked emails didn't come from Russia

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange told Fox News that hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman did not come from a Russian source.

Fox News host Sean Hannity asked Assange if he could "tell the American people 1,000%" that WikiLeaks did not get the hacked material from Russia.

"Yes. We can say, we have said, repeatedly that over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party," Assange said.

Assange's reliability on this matter, however, is questionable. Former United Nations ambassador John Bolton, for instance, told Fox News on Tuesday that he wouldn't trust Assange.

Assange also accused the Obama administration of trying to undermine the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump.

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A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds a banner outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds banners outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange makes a speech from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy, in central London, Britain February 5, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/Files
Julian Assange, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of WikiLeaks speaks via video link during a press conference on the occasion of the ten year anniversary celebration of WikiLeaks in Berlin, Germany, October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Axel Schmidt TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears on screen via video link during his participation as a guest panelist in an International Seminar on the 60th anniversary of the college of Journalists of Chile in Santiago, Chile, July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido
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"They're trying to delegitimize the Trump administration as it goes into the White House," Assange said of the Obama administration's response to the leaking of hacked emails. "They are trying to say that President-elect Trump is not a legitimate President."

The Obama administration has strongly condemned the hacks and increased sanctions on Russia.

US intelligence agencies have blamed Russia for leaking emails from DNC officials and Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta in the weeks and months leading up to the election. US officials have said Russia was attempting to sway the election in Trump's favor.

"Did it (WikiLeaks) change the outcome of the election? Who knows, it's impossible to tell," Assange told Fox. "But if it did, the accusation is that the true statements of Hillary Clinton and her campaign manager, John Podesta, and the DNC head Debbie Wasserman Schultz, their true statements is what changed the election."

Emails showed DNC officials seeming to favor Clinton over her Democratic primary challenger Sen. Bernie Sanders. The Podesta emails contained excerpts of Clinton's controversial speeches to financial firm Goldman Sachs and also showed campaign officials speaking candidly about the election.

Trump has refused to pin blame on Russia for the hacks, and last week he said he has information others don't on who is responsible.

"I also know things that other people don't know, and so they cannot be sure of the situation," he told reporters.

Asked what he knew that others do not, Trump replied: "You'll find out Tuesday or Wednesday."

It's unclear what exactly Trump was referring to, but it's possible that it's the interview with Assange.

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