Church used bones of 40,000 humans to create terrifyingly beautiful decorations

Some like to spend their holidays lounging on a beach, feeling the warmth on their skin and the sand between their toes. Others prefer to be in a poorly light tunnel, surrounded by stacks of human bones.

If you get a thrill out of the macabre, then plan a trip to Paris this year. Besides visiting the Eiffel Tower, perusing the Louvre and strolling along the Seine River, you can join thousands of visitors to walk five stories below the Parisian streets into a tunnel with walls coated in human bones.

Starting in 1786, the remains of millions of Parisians were placed into disused labyrinth quarries in the heart of the city to help elevate overflowing cemeteries and stop sources of infection. This continued into the 19th century, and became open to the visitors in 1814.

If that is not enough death for one vacation, then you can jump over to Kutná Hora, a suburb in the Czech Republic, which is famous for Sedlec Ossuary, or the 'Bone Church.'

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Creepy places around the world made out of human bones
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Creepy places around the world made out of human bones
A photo taken on October,14, 2014 at the Paris catacombs of Paris shows a corridor with the inscription: 'Stop! Here is the empire of death'. The underground quarries were used to store the remains of generations of Parisians in a bid to cope with the overcrowding of Paris cemeteries at the end of the 18th century, and are now a popular tourist attraction AFP PHOTO / PATRICK KOVARIK RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE (Photo credit should read PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/Getty Images)
The Realm of the Dead, the Catacombs of Paris or Catacombes de Paris are underground ossuaries in Paris, France. Halls and caverns of walls of carefully arranged bones and skulls of over 6 million people.
Paris, Ile-de-France, France, Europe
France, Paris, Catacombs
Les Catacombes 5
The Catacombs of Paris, France
Fully clothed human remains, representing some of the world's best-preserved bodies, are displayed at the Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo, southern Italy, January 31, 2011. The catacombs, frequented by tourists, contain thousands of remains of clerics, nobility, and families of local citizens dating from about the mid-16th century, well preserved due to an ancient and highly effective embalming process. Originally intended for friars of the Capuchin monastery, the catacombs evolved, with the aid of donations, into a place where family members would visit, spend time with and even change the clothes of the deceased. The last burial was Rosalia Lombardo, two-years old, in the 1920s. REUTERS/Tony Gentile (ITALY - Tags: SOCIETY)
PALERMO, ITALY AUGUST 15: The Catacombs of the Capuchins of Palermo it preserves 8,000 bodies mummified of Capuchins to nobles, bourgeois and representatives of the clergy 1500 until the end of the nineteenth century, to Cuba neighborhood on August 15, 2016 in Palermo, Italy. (Photo by Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty).
PALERMO, ITALY AUGUST 15: The Catacombs of the Capuchins of Palermo it preserves 8,000 bodies mummified of Capuchins to nobles, bourgeois and representatives of the clergy 1500 until the end of the nineteenth century, to Cuba neighborhood on August 15, 2016 in Palermo, Italy. (Photo by Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty).
Napoli, cemetery of the Fontanelle
Three crosses surrounded by skulls in Fontanelle cemetery in Naples, Italy.
Kutna Hora, Slovakia - July 8, 2009: Sedlec Ossuary (aka Church of Bones) beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints, contains over 40,000 skeletons whose bones are artistically arranged as decorations
A pile of bones and skulls inside the Sedlec Ossuary (Kostnice v Sedlci), a Roman Catholic chapel in Kutna Hora, Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain skeletons of between 40,000 to 70,000 people mostly arranged as decoration and furnishings. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most visited places in the Czech Republic.
Arrangement of human bones in the Sedlec ossuary, Kutna Hora, Bohemia, Czech Republic
Decoration with human bones, Sedlec Ossuary, 1870, cemetary of All Saints Church, Kutna Hora, Central Bohemia region, Czech Republic.
Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic, Eastern Europe, Europe
UNESCO World Heritage List, 1995. Chapel of All Saints, 15th century. Ossuary (Kostnice). Vaults by Architect Jan Blazej Santini-Aichel, 1708-12. Decorations made of human bones, arranged by the woodcarver Frantisek Rint.
Picture taken in the ossuary, Czech Republic, Kutna Hora. The remains of people who died from the plague.
Lower Chapel
Bohemia, Kutna Hora, Czech Republic - May 23, 2011 - Decorative chandelier made from human bones and skulls in Bone church or Sedlec Ossuary (Kostnice v Sedlci), a small Roman Catholic chapel.
Kutna Hora, CZECH REPUBLIC: A man looks at a Baroque period bone-chandelier hanging over 4 Gothic pinnacles in the Sedlec Ossuary, a small Chapel beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutna Hora, about 75 Km east of Prague, 14 January, 2007. Although the ossuary dates back to the 14th century, its current decoration is made of some 40,000 human remains from the 18th century. AFP PHOTO / MICHAL CIZEK (Photo credit should read MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)
Panoramic view of Lima main square and cathedral church.
Lima, Lima, Peru, South America
Human skulls and bones arranged in circles underneath San Francisco Monastery in Lima, Peru.
San Bernardino alle Ossa, a church in Milan - Italy
Real skull and bones in San Bernardino alle Ossa church in Milan
San Bernardino alle Ossa is a church in Milan, northern Italy, best known for its ossuary, a small side chapel decorated with numerous human skulls and bones.
Real skull and bones in San Bernardino alle Ossa church in Milan
Real skull and bones in San Bernardino alle Ossa church in Milan
The Skull Chapel in Czermna, Kudowa Zdroj, Poland.
The Skull Chapel in Czermna, Kudowa Zdroj, Poland.
Kudowa-Zdroj, Dolnoslaskie, Poland, Eastern Europe, Europe
Evora, PORTUGAL: A view inside the chapel of bones (Capela dos Ossos) 22 May 2006, in Evora 100 km south east of Lisbon. Built by Franciscan monks between 1460 and 1510, the chapel is constructed of the bones of some 5,000 people. AFP PHOTO/NICOLAS ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Evora, Alentejo, Portugal, Europe
the capela dos ossos at the Igreja do Carmo in the old town of Faro at the east Algarve in the south of Portugal in Europe.
Capela dos Ossos, Faro, Eastern Algarve, Algarve, Portugal, Europe
the capela dos ossos at the Igreja do Carmo in the old town of Faro at the east Algarve in the south of Portugal in Europe.
Skulls and bones stacked on a shelf at Hallstatt, a famous archaeological site in Salzkammergut. | Location: charnel house, Hallstatt, Salzkammergut, Austria.
Altar with skull and bones, Schädelpietà, Ossuary or charnel house of the fortified church St. Michael, WeiÃenkirchen, Wachau, Waldviertel, Lower Austria, Austria, Europe
Ossuary (Charnel House) Of The Holy Monastery Of St. Catherine At Mount Sinai, South Sinai, Egypt (Photo by: Insights/UIG via Getty Images)
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An hour away from Prague in this seemingly ordinary church lies one massive -- and terrifyingly beautiful -- chandelier entirely made out of human bones.

Starting in the 13th century, the Abbot of the Sedlec Monastery spread a handful of 'holy soil' from Jerusalem on the cemetery, making it one of the most desirable places to be buried in the region. According to Atlas Obsura, there were over 30,000 bodies laid to rest there before they were moved to a crypt.

In 1870, a local woodcarver was tasked with artistically arranging the bones. He created the famous chandelier, bells in the chapel and a coat of arms of the Schwarzenberg noble family. There are ultimately remains from 40,000 individuals in the church.

Art historian Paul Koudounaris explains in his book 'The Empire of Death: A Cultural History of Ossuaries and Charnel Houses' that these decorated sites have their roots in early Christian culture. Bodies were preserved and buried rather than cremated because they believed the body would be resurrected when Christ returned.

Click through the gallery above to see the Catacombs of Paris, Sedlec Ossuary and other sites that utilize human bones as decorum.

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