Neo-Nazi sets sights on Drexel after professor's 'white genocide' tweet

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Richard Spencer, the defacto leader of the neo-Nazi "alt-right" movement, has set his sites on Drexel University after a professor at the college drew fire over the weekend over comments he made online advocating for "white genocide."

"All I want for Christmas is white genocide," George Ciccariello-Maher, an associate professor of politics and global studies, posted on Twitter on Sunday. He then doubled down on his vitriolic comments on Sunday, posting "To clarify: when the whites were massacre during the Haitian revolution, that was a good thing indeed."

Related: Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer through the years

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Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer through the years
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Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer through the years
White nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute speaks on campus at an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute arrives on campus to speak at an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
Undocumented Texas A&M students and their supporters protest silently as white nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute speaks on campus at an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
Organizer Preston Wigginton shakes hands with white nationalist leader Richard Spencer after introducing him at an event on campus not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
Jacob Jackson, a freshman international studies major, listens after asking a question to white nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute at an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
White nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute speaks on campus as a silent protester holds a placard at an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
White nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute speaks on campus during an event not sanctioned by the school, at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
White nationalist leader Richard Spencer of the National Policy Institute waves goodbye after his speech during an event not sanctioned by the school, on campus at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, U.S. December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Spencer Selvidge
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Richard Spencer is in town for the largest white nationalist and Alt Right conference of the year in Washington, DC on November 18, 2016. Spencer, a 38-year-old Dallas native and graduate of St. Mark's School of Texas prep school, is a key intellectual leader of the alternative right, a label he coined in 2008 to describe the radical conservative movement defined by white nationalism and a fervent resistance to multiculturalism and globalism. Spencer currently resides in the resort town of Whitefish, Montana, in what was described as a 'Bavarian-style mansion' in a profile in Mother Jones. He was born in Massachusetts but moved to the Preston Hollow neighborhood of Dallas when he was about 2 years old. 'It was a fairly idyllic, suburban childhood,' Spencer said with a laugh. 'I remember riding bikes around the neighborhood, and so on. I guess you could say I lived in a bubble to a certain extent, like a lot of the kids in that area. But it was very nice.' (Photo by Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Richard Spencer is in town for the largest white nationalist and Alt Right conference of the year in Washington, DC on November 18, 2016. Spencer, a 38-year-old Dallas native and graduate of St. Mark's School of Texas prep school, is a key intellectual leader of the alternative right, a label he coined in 2008 to describe the radical conservative movement defined by white nationalism and a fervent resistance to multiculturalism and globalism. Spencer currently resides in the resort town of Whitefish, Montana, in what was described as a 'Bavarian-style mansion' in a profile in Mother Jones. He was born in Massachusetts but moved to the Preston Hollow neighborhood of Dallas when he was about 2 years old. 'It was a fairly idyllic, suburban childhood,' Spencer said with a laugh. 'I remember riding bikes around the neighborhood, and so on. I guess you could say I lived in a bubble to a certain extent, like a lot of the kids in that area. But it was very nice.' (Photo by Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 20: (L-R) Discussion panelists Peter Brimelow, Jared Taylor, Kevin MacDonald, 'Millenial Woes' (thats the name he goes by) and Richard Spencer field questions at an Alt Right ( alternative right) conference hosted by the National Policy Institute in Washington, DC on November 18, 2016. The think tank promotes white nationalism and critics accuse them of being racist and anti-semitic. The chairman of the National Policy Institute, Richard Spencer, has been permanently banned from entering the UK, and was deemed a 'national security threat' after his arrest in Hungary in 2014. He was recently banned from Twitter in a prominent purge by the company this week. (Photo by Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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The university responded to the tweets in a statement posted on its website on Sunday calling his comments "utterly reprehensible" and "deeply disturbing" and that university officials planned to meet with him to discuss it.

Now Spencer, who garnered headlines earlier this year after a conference of his"alt-right" National Policy Institute ended with Nazi salutes, is in the midst of planning a college speaking tour, and is now looking for students at Drexel to host him.

"Anyone at Drexel able to bring me to speak to the student body? Contact me," he posted to Twitter on Monday, along with a link to the page advertising his speaking tour.

Spencer describes his college tour as follows: "Richard Spencer—the originator of the term "Alt Right" and one of the most politically incorrect men alive—is coming to your college! He'll debate your favorite feminist professor . . . make the SJWs cry . . . and rustle the jimmies of the campus, if not the world. Or rather, he will come to your campus if you take the lead in offering him an invitation."

The first stop on Spencer's college tour was Texas A&M University in early December. It was met with mobs of angry students and others outraged that a neo-Nazi was speaking at their college. Video of the speech posted online shows Spencer arguing with and insulting the dozens of protestors who got into the conference hall as well-known white supremacists stood guard. He mocked people in the crowd for not assaulting him when that's what many claimed they intended to do prior to his appearance.

Other neo-Nazis are somehow chalking Ciccariello-Maher's "white genocide" comments as a win for the "alt-right" movement.

"We are a bloc now with power," Andrew Anglin, the publisher of the white supremacist Daily Stormer blog, wrote in a post published Tuesday. "Institutions respond to us. A year ago, this same university wouldn't have blinked before responding to complaints with a generic 'we support the free expression of our teachers' blurb. And not a statement on their own site. It would just be a statement to media...This is what winning looks like, people. You'd better get used to it."

This is hardly the first time Ciccariello-Maher has posted disparaging things about white people on Twitter; his page was made private after the "white genocide" controversy, but the Daily Caller accessed tweets dating back to 2013 where the professor mused about killing white people.

"Son: If I was a slave, I'd bake a cake & put a potion in it & the white people would steal it Me: What would the potion do? Him: Kill them," he joked in September about a purported conversation with his son, according to the right-leaning website. In another post, in 2015, he wrote "abolish the white race."

"While Drexel has been nothing but supportive in the past, this statement is worrying. While upholding my right to free expression, the statement refers to my (satirical) tweets as 'utterly reprehensible,'" Ciccariello-Maher wrote in a statement to the website. "White supremacy is on the rise, and we must fight it by any means. In that fight, universities will need to choose whether they are on the side of free expression and academic debate, or on the side of the racist mob."

The post Neo-Nazi Sets Sights On Drexel After Prof's 'White Genocide' Tweet appeared first on Vocativ.

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