Israel weakens relations with 12 UN Security Council countries

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has ordered Israel's diplomatic relations with 12 countries on the U.N. Security Council to be reduced.

The Security Council voted 14-0 to condemn Israeli settlements in Palestinian territory.

The small nation weakened its working ties with Britain, France, Russia, China, Japan, Ukraine, Angola, Egypt, Uruguay, Spain, Senegal and New Zealand after the countries voted for the resolution against Israel's expansion. Venezuela and Malaysia also supported the resolution but had no working diplomatic ties with Israel.

RELATED: UN Security Council votes on Israeli settlements

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UN Security Council votes on Israeli settlements
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UN Security Council votes on Israeli settlements

General view of the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

United States permanent Ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power attends the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

General view of the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Permanent Representative of Israel to the United Nations Danny Danon attends the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Palestinian representative to the UN Riyad Mansour attends the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

General view of the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

United States permanent Ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power attends the United Nations Security Council meeting in New York, United States on December 23, 2016. U.N. Security Council resolution that demands Israel stop settlement activities on Palestinian territories.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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The brunt of Netanyahu's fury landed in President Obama's lap, since the U.S. has veto power and historically has used it to protect Israel from these type of votes.

More from Newsy: Israel Isn't Happy With The US After UN Security Council Vote

The U.S. ambassador to Israel was summoned to meet with Netanyahu, but Israeli ties to the U.S. remain intact for now.

Israeli ministers are now expected to travel to those countries as little as possible. And foreign ministers from those countries won't be recognized in Israel.

The order to cut diplomatic ties has little real-world impact since it doesn't affect trade or military cooperation. Instead, it acts as a political statement.

Netanyahu said he blamed the Obama administration for orchestrating the vote. And he said he looks forward to working with President-elect Donald Trump, who criticized the vote.

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