A message of peace as Obama and Abe meet at Pearl Harbor

U.S. President Barack Obama hosting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Pearl Harbor spoke of lessons of peace saying the two leaders sent a message that "there is more to be won in peace than in war."

Standing side by side with Abe, Obama said,. "As nations, and as people, we cannot choose the history that we inherit, but we can choose what lesson to draw from it," Obama said.

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President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
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President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe deliver remarks at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, U.S., December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) and U.S. President Barack Obama (L) bow their heads during a wreath-laying ceremony aboard the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, U.S., December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

U.S. President Barack Obama prepares to deliver remarks at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam's Kilo Pier on December 27, 2016 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Shinzo Abe is the first Japanese prime minister to visit Pearl Harbor with a U.S. president and the first to visit the USS Arizona Memorial.

(Photo by Kent Nishimura/Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe greet Pearl Harbor survivors Everett Hyland, Al Rodrigues and Sterling Cale after giving remarks at Kilo Pier overlooking the USS Arizona Memorial at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S. December27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Hugh Gentry)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) talks with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting at Camp H.M. Smith in Aiea, Hawaii, U.S., December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

U.S. President Barack Obama releases flower petals following a wreath-laying ceremony with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) aboard the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, U.S., December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) greets a Pearl Harbor survivor after delilvering remarks with U.S. President Barack Obama at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, U.S., December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe greet Pearl Harbor Survivors Everett Hyland, Al Rodrigues and Sterling Cale after giving remarks at Kilo Pier overlooking the USS Arizona Memorial at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii, December 27, 2016.

(REUTERS/Hugh Gentry)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam's Kilo Pier on December 27, 2016 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Abe is the first Japanese prime minister to visit Pearl Harbor with a U.S. president and the first to visit the USS Arizona Memorial.

(Photo by Kent Nishimura/Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama (C) and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe greet veterans at Kilo Pier overlooking the USS Arizona Memorial on December 27, 2016 at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. Abe and Obama made a joint pilgrimage to the site of the Pearl Harbor attack on Tuesday to celebrate 'the power of reconciliation. 'The Japanese attack on an unsuspecting US fleet moored at Pearl Harbor turned the Pacific into a cauldron of conflict -- more than 2,400 were killed and a reluctant America was drawn into World War II.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama (R) listens as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks at the USS Arizona Memorial on December 27, 2016 at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. Abe and Obama made a joint pilgrimage to the site of the Pearl Harbor attack on Tuesday to celebrate 'the power of reconciliation. 'The Japanese attack on an unsuspecting US fleet moored at Pearl Harbor turned the Pacific into a cauldron of conflict -- more than 2,400 were killed and a reluctant America was drawn into World War II.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

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Abe offered his condolences to the people who were killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, after visiting the memorial to the sunken battleship USS Arizona.

"President Obama, the people of the United States of America and the people around the world, as the prime minister of Japan I offer my sincere and everlasting condolences to the souls of those who have lost their lives here," Abe said.

Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor with torpedo planes, bombers and fighter planes on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, pounding the U.S. fleet moored there in the hope of destroying U.S. power in the Pacific.

The meeting is also meant to reinforce the U.S.-Japan partnership ahead of the Jan. 20 inauguration of Donald Trump, whose opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact and campaign threat to force allied countries to pay more to host U.S. forces raised concerns among allies such as Japan.

Abe met with Trump in New York in November and called him a "trustworthy leader."

The Japanese leader's visit to Pearl Harbor comes months after Obama became the first incumbent U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, where the United States dropped an atomic bomb in 1945.

Related: Pearl Harbor survivors visit the base on the 75th Anniversary

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Pearl Harbor survivors visit the base on the 75th Anniversary
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Pearl Harbor survivors visit the base on the 75th Anniversary
Pearl Harbor survivor Bill Hughes, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, arrives at a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Pearl Harbor survivor Delton Walling talks with U.S. Navy Admiral Margaret Kibben before a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Pearl Harbor survivors Delton Walling (C), Gilbert Meyer (R) and U.S. Navy Admiral Margaret Kibben salute during a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Pearl Harbor survivor Gilbert Meyer, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, attends a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Pearl Harbor survivor Bill Hughes, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, arrives at a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Pearl Harbor survivor Delton Walling walks with family members during a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Pearl Harbor survivor Bill Hughes, who was aboard the USS Utah when it was attacked, arrives at a ceremony honoring the sailors of the USS Utah at the memorial on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 6, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
USS Arizona survivor Loren Bruner looks out the window of a helicopter during a special tour over the USS Arizona Memorial and Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
USS Arizona survivor Loren Bruner looks out the window of a helicopter as he took a special tour over the USS Arizona Memorial and Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
James Leavelle, a 96-year-old Pearl Harbor Survivor, attends an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend ceremonies for the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., December 2, 2016. Picture taken December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Nelson Mitchell, a 97-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, attends an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend ceremonies for the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., December 2, 2016. Picture taken December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Emery Arsenault, a 95-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, attends an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend ceremonies for the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., December 2, 2016. Picture taken December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Tom Person, a 95-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, salutes during the national anthem at an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend ceremonies for the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., December 2, 2016. Picture taken December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Tom Person, a 95-year-old Pearl Harbor survivor, attends an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend ceremonies for the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S. December 2, 2016. Picture taken December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
The USO show troop from New York performs during an event honoring 30 surviving World War II veterans who will travel to Hawaii to attend the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., December 2, 2016. Picture taken on December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Jerry Yellin, a former captain and World War Two Army Air Force P-51 pilot, embraces Hiroya Sugano, director general of the Zero Fighter Admirers Club, during the 6th annual Blackened Canteen ceremony at the USS Arizona Memorial, during the 75th Commemoration of the attacks on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, U.S. December 6, 2016. US Navy/Petty Officer 2nd Class Somers Steelman/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Ray Chavez, 104, the oldest living Pearl Harbor survivor, rings the Freedom Bell during the Freedom Bell Opening Ceremony and Bell Ringing at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, U.S. December 6, 2016. U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Wesley Timm/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Pearl Harbor survivor Fred Smith signs his autograph for Melissa Downy before the ceremonies honoring the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at Kilo Pier on Joint Base Pearl Harbor - Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii, US December 7, 2016. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
HONOLULU, HI - DECEMBER 07: USS Arizona survivor Louis Conter signs autographs before the start of a ceremony commemorating the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor at Kilo Pier on December 07, 2016 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (Photo by Kent Nishimura/Getty Images)
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