Sen. Harry Reid blasts Democratic National Committee as 'worthless'

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid has already bid farewell to his colleagues. But the retiring Democratic senator isn't leaving his post without making a few more attention-grabbing comments.

"I believe one of the failures of the Democratic Party has been the DNC. The Democratic National Committee has been worthless," Reid said.

Reid, who has served in Congress for 34 years, was on Nevada Public Radio on Wednesday when a caller asked what he thought about Democratic races in 2018.

The senator immediately turned his attention to the Democratic National Committee.

RELATED: Harry Reid through the years

9 PHOTOS
Harry Reid
See Gallery
Harry Reid
Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Democratic leaders Reid and Pelosi spoke about the possible shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security if Congress can not pass a bill to fund the department. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid listens during a press conference on Capitol Hill on February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Democratic leaders Reid and Nancy Pelosi spoke about the possible shutdown of the US Department of Homeland Security if Congress cannot pass a bill to fund the department. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) listens during a press conference on Capitol Hill February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Democratic leaders Reid and Pelosi spoke about the possible shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security if Congress can not pass a bill to fund the department. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) listens while House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Democratic leaders Reid and Pelosi spoke about the possible shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security if Congress can not pass a bill to fund the department. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) listens while Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Democratic leaders Reid and Pelosi spoke about the possible shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security if Congress can not pass a bill to fund the department. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) answer reporters' questions during a news conference in the Radio Television Gallery at the U.S. Captiol February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid and Pelosi were critical of the Republican leadership in the House and Senate because of the delay in funding for the Department of Homeland Security. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) answer reporters' questions during a news conference in the Radio Television Gallery at the U.S. Captiol February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid and Pelosi were critical of the Republican leadership in the House and Senate because of the delay in funding for the Department of Homeland Security. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) answers reports' questions during a news conference in the Radio Television Gallery at the U.S. Captiol February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) were critical of the Republican leadership in the House and Senate because of the delay in funding for the Department of Homeland Security. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"They do nothing to help state parties. That should be the main goal they have. I developed everything in Nevada on my own. Their help was relatively meaningless," Reid said of the DNC.

More from Newsy: Reid Doesn't Hold Back On Senate Floor Rant About Trump

Reid then offered up a few suggestions on how to improve the DNC — and its election outcomes — over the next few years. Those include focusing on three to four states each election cycle to "help them develop the infrastructure for good state party organization."

Reid also said he hopes the committee ends up selecting a full-time chair.

"Not someone like we had with that congresswoman from Florida, who was a full-time congressman and a part-time chair of the DNC," Reid said.

Reid was referring to Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz who resigned over the summer. Her resignation came after leaked emails appeared to show that the DNC tried to undercut Hillary Clinton's primary opponent, Sen. Bernie Sanders.

RELATED: Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigns

11 PHOTOS
Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigns
See Gallery
Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigns
CHARLESTON, SC - JANUARY 17: U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL 23rd District) and chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) speaks to reporters in the spin room after watching tonight's democratic presidential debate at the Gaillard Center on January 17, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley spent yesterday campaigning in South Carolina in lead up to tonight's debate. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: DNC Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) introduces US President Barack Obama during the Democratic National Committee's Women's Leadership Forum, September 19, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Womens Leadership Forum is holding their 21st annual National Issues Conference a the Marriot Marquis Hotel. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (R) hugs DNC Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (L), D-FL, as Clinton arrives on stage to speak at the Democratic National Committee's Womens Leadership Forum Issues Conference in Washington, DC on September 19, 2014. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 23: Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz attends a campaign rally at Florida International University Panther Arena on July 23, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine made their first public appearance together a day after the Clinton campaign announced Senator Kaine as the Democratic vice presidential candidate. (Photo by Alexander Tamargo/WireImage)
Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chairperson of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), speaks during a campaign event for Hillary Clinton, presumptive 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, not pictured, in Miami, Florida, U.S., on Saturday, July 23, 2016. Clinton named Virginia Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate for the Democratic presidential ticket, a widely-anticipated choice that may say more about how she wants to govern than how she plans to win in November. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz speaks at a rally, before the arrival of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her vice presidential running mate U.S. Senator Tim Kaine, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 23, 2016. Picture taken July 23, 2016. REUTERS/Scott Audette
Democratic National Committee chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz talks with members of the media before the Democratic presidential candidates debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, December 19, 2015. REUTERS/Gretchen Ertl
U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) stands with her friend Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) (R) during a farewell ceremony for Giffords on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, in this still image taken from video, January 25, 2012. Giffords, wounded a year ago in a deadly Tucson shooting spree, stepped down from the U.S. Congress on Wednesday to focus on her recovery. REUTERS/HouseTV/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS PROFILE SOCIETY)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 21: Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., descends the House steps after a vote in the Capitol, October 21 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
CHARLESTON, SC - JANUARY 17: U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL 23rd District) and chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) speaks to reporters in the spin room after watching tonight's democratic presidential debate at the Gaillard Center on January 17, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley spent yesterday campaigning in South Carolina in lead up to tonight's debate. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

More from Newsy: NSA Director Confirms DNC Hack Was An Attack By A Foreign Government

Right now, Rep. Keith Ellison and Labor Secretary Tom Perez are running for the position. Ellison has vowed to leave his House seat if he wins the DNC chair.

In an interview with Politico earlier this month, Reid said, "I don't think the Democratic Party is in that big of trouble," when asked whether the party needed to reevaluate its approach following Democratic loses, including that of Clinton, in the November presidential election.

Instead, Reid laid blame on FBI Director James Comey for Clinton's loss and the party's limited seat gains in Congress.

Regardless of what — if any — changes the DNC makes, Reid predicts Democrats will have some gains in 2018.

Reid said, "With rare exception, the midterm election for a first-year president is a disaster for the president."

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.