Military makes plans for potential Trump evacuation

By Claire Hardwick for Veuer

The military is making its plans on what to do if President-elect Donald Trump needs to be evacuated from New York City according to sources who told "On the Inside."

A military airplane with two huge helicopters did loops over Midtown in Manhattan for what was their "emergency relocation" planning in lieu of an emergency or an attack.

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The military aircrafts did loops over what is now a no fly zone in this area. The military aircrafts were finding a location where a chopper could land near Trump Towers and evacuate the president-elect should an emergency situation occur.

The primary spot will be Central Park, which is just north of trump's residence in New York The NYPD wants to have advance notice of these procedures.

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10. New York City, New York

(Photo via Getty Images)

9. Los Angeles, California

(Photo via Getty Images)

8. Chicago, Illinois

(Photo via Getty Images)

7. Miami, Florida

(Photo via Getty Images)

6. Washington, DC

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5. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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4. Boston, Massachusetts

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3. Atlanta, Georgia

(Photo via Getty Images)

2. Houston, Texas

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1. Dallas, Texas

(Photo via Getty Images)

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A law enforcement source said, "they should have told people they were doing recon, and going to fly at low altitudes, instead of keeping it a secret." NYPD Commissioner James O'Neill told reporters that they will work on improving notification procedures.

RELATED: Trump properties in NYC

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