The New York Times calls for end of Electoral College

On Monday, the nation's electors cast the votes to make Donald Trump the next president of the United States.

That same day, the editorial board of the New York Times called for an end to the Electoral College.

SEE ALSO: Trump's off-the-record cocktail party with reporters draws criticism

The board writes, "By overwhelming majorities, Americans would prefer to elect the president by direct popular vote, not filtered through the antiquated mechanism of the Electoral College."

Take a closer look at the Electoral College voting process:

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Trump receives electoral college vote
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Trump receives electoral college vote
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh holds her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump before casting it at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Pennsylvania electors bow their heads in prayer before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Protesters rally outside as Michigan's 16 presidential electors meet at the State Capitol building to cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Electoral college tellers count the ballots Pennsylvania electors cast for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors take their oath of office before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters of President-elect Donald Trump hold signs in the Senate gallery as Michigan's electors cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
North Carolina's Thirteenth District Elector Ann Sullivan wears clothes adorned with patriotic and Republican Party symbols after the state's Electoral College affirmed their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Protesters shout in anger from the gallery at Pennsylvania electors after they cast their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh smiles as she returns to her seat after casting her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives pose for a group photo after formally voting for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after affirming their votes, all for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at a ceremony in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
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It further notes, "...the college, which allocates electors based on each state's representation in Congress, tips the scales in favor of smaller states; a Wyoming resident's vote counts 3.6 times as much as a Californian's. And because almost all states use a winner-take-all system, the election ends up being fought in just a dozen or so 'battleground' states, leaving tens of millions of Americans on the sidelines."

The board reasons, "Conservative opponents of a direct vote say it would give an unfair edge to large, heavily Democratic cities and states. But why should the votes of Americans in California or New York count for less than those in Idaho or Texas? A direct popular vote would treat all Americans equally, no matter where they live — including, by the way, Republicans in San Francisco and Democrats in Corpus Christi, whose votes are currently worthless."

As a remedy, the authors suggest more states agree to the National Popular Vote interstate compact, which allows electors to back the winner of the overall popular vote.

That system has already been approved by the District of Columbia and 11 states.

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