'Merry Christmas' vs. 'Happy Holidays' debate splits Republicans and Democrats

The debate over whether stores and businesses should greet customers with a "Happy Holidays" vs. a "Merry Christmas" slogan has been a hot button issue for some time.

The controversy has now sharply drawn a line between Democrats and Republicans, though, with 66 percent of Democrats saying they prefer the non-religious affiliated "Happy Holidays" greeting according to a PRRI survey.

To the contrary, 67 percent of Republicans believe the greeting of "Merry Christmas" is acceptable and should remain the go-to season's greeting with which stores should greet customers.

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With the gradual decline of Christianity as a highlighted feature of the Christmas season, Democrats are twice as likely as Republicans to believe businesses should stay away from the traditional "Merry Christmas" greeting in fairness to those of varying faith backgrounds.

While political party affiliation is one clear indicator of likelihood to favor "Happy Holidays," the survey also shows a shift in slogan preference among age demographics. Two thirds (67 percent) of young adults age 18-29 say it is better for businesses to use "Happy Holidays," compared to only 38 percent of seniors age 65 and older.

With a new wave of young adults entering the conversation, 67 percent of them (ages 18-29) prefer something generic like "Season's Greetings" where 54 percent of seniors (ages 65 and older) still say "Merry Christmas" is the better option.

While nearly nine in 10 Americans report celebrating the annual Christmas holiday, Republicans and Democrats approach Dec. 25 in different ways -- likely fueling their dissimilar view on the preferred season's greetings. While 60 percent of Republicans say they have "strongly religious celebrations of Christmas," only 32 percent of Democrats can say the same.

As the battle for the appropriate seasons greeting rages on, so does the battle between political parties.

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