What to expect from the Electoral College vote

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The Electoral College's vote on Monday will end one of the most dramatic presidential elections in U.S. history. But what should you — the voter — expect?

Donald Trump defied the odds and pulled off a surprising victory last month, securing 306 electoral votes to Hillary Clinton's 232.

SEE MORE: Electors Won't Be Briefed On Russian Hacking

That means Trump should easily meet the 270-vote threshold to officially win the presidency and secure his claim on the White House, ending any last-ditch efforts to delegitimize his win. That is, as long as the electors vote how they originally intended.

Despite the Russian hacking allegations and concern over Trump's diplomacy skills, only one Republican elector has said he will not vote for Trump. It would take 37 total Republican electors to flip the majority to Clinton.

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Recounting votes from the 2016 election
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Recounting votes from the 2016 election
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as an observer from the Republican Party (R) watches during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as a volunteer observer watches during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as a volunteer observer (L) watches during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as a challenger watches over their shoulders during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as challengers from the Green Party (2nd L) and the Republican Party (R) watch during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
A sign points the way to the room where Oakland County clerks count election ballots during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan, U.S., December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Oakland County clerks count election ballots as challengers watch over their shoulders during a recount of presidential ballots in Waterford Township, Michigan December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Ballots from the 2016 U.S. presidential election are recounted, following a request by the Green Party, in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S. December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Ben Brewer
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Chris Suprun is a Republican elector from Texas. If he votes against Trump, he'll be what's known as a "faithless elector." Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia penalize electors who change their votes.

This presidential election marks the second out of the past five cycles that have seen the winner of the popular vote lose the electoral college decision due to how the electoral votes are spread throughout the states.

RELATED: 2016 Electoral College results

Calls to end the Electoral College surged after Trump's win, but that's probably not going to happen.

And if, somehow, the Electoral College doesn't vote for a majority winner, the decision will be sent to the House of Representatives.

SEE MORE: Jill Stein Can't Win — US Judge Rejects Pennsylvania Recount Motion

That's still unlikely to change the outcome of the election, since Republicans hold the majority in both chambers of Congress.

No matter what happens, it's a safe bet Trump will use his preferred mode of communication — Twitter — to either accept victory or something less gracious.

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