From half-pipes to gun turrets, skateboarder goes on a mission

A British professional skater has partnered with a production firm to film his skating skills on top of an off-shore World War Two machine-gun turret, hoping to raise awareness of the abandoned fort.

The Red Sands Fort was built in 1942 on the Thames estuary, 12 miles from the British shore, to protect Britain during the war.

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The Red Sands Fort
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The Red Sands Fort

World War 2 sea forts off the North Kent coast near Herne Bay/Whitstable UK.

(Neil Brown via Getty Images)

Sea Gulls fly above Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England .The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

October 1, 1944

These forts protected Britain's east coast shipping. Some were manned by the Royal Artillery, others were commissioned as HM ships. They were named after the sands on which they stand.

(Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

The bathroom of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

Disc jockeys Eric Martin, Alan Clarke, Leslie Dunne and Paul Kramer leaving the pirate radio station, Radio City, which had been based at Shivering Sands Army Fort, near the Thames estuary, February 1967. The structures are abandoned Second World War Maunsell Sea Forts. The radio station closed following the British government's passing of the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act.

(Photo by Peter Powell/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Sea Gulls fly above Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

A man wearing a radio Caroline t-shirt takes a photo of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

These Maunsell Forts at Shivering Sands, Kent, c1945-c1965, were constructed in 1943 to defend shipping lines and the port of London from enemy aircraft and V1 rockets.They were under the command of the 1st Anti-aircraft Fort Regiment until the end of World War II. They are now derelict.

(Photo by English Heritage/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

The bathroom of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

An Ack Ack gun mounted on top of one of the forts ready to give a warm welcome to any marauder note the tubular bridge connecting the forts each with its neighbor. November 1944.

(WATFORD/Mirrorpix/Mirrorpix via Getty Images)

General view of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

The bathroom of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

General view of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

General view of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

World War 2 sea forts off the North Kent coast near Herne Bay/Whitstable UK.

(Neil Brown via Getty Images)

A detail of the state of repair of Redsand towers on June 30, 2006 in Whitstable, England The Redsand Towers, coded 'Uncle 6' during WW2 were built to protect supply ships from the German magnetic influence mines. The forts succeeded in shooting down 22 planes and 30 flying bombs. In 1964, Radio Caroline began broadcasting from a ship moored outside UK Territorial Waters this prompted as series of other pirate stations including Radio 390 based on Redsand.

(Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

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Ed Birch, from the filming company Salt-Street Productions, said the location was chosen because of its striking aesthetic and its incredible history, adding he hopes the video will help get the towers restored.

In the video, Mancunian skater Ben Grove can be seen performing using the materials found at the site, which include pipes, wires and wood.

"The location is of course not really built for skating but that in itself is part of the magic of it," Birch said. "This is what makes it so spectacular."

The armed towers were decommissioned in the late 50s and were later used for pirate radio broadcasting, Salt-Street said.

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