The president of the Philippines just bragged about 'personally' killing people

During a business forum in Manila on Monday, Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte bragged about killing people while he was mayor of Davao City, CNN reported. "In Davao, I used to do it personally. Just to show the guys that, if I can do it, why can't you," he said.

Duterte also bragged about riding around the city in search of people to kill — "And [I'd] go around Davao with a motorcycle, with a big bike around and I would just patrol the streets and looking for trouble also," he said. "I was really looking for an encounter so I could kill."

Duterte had previously been accused of ordering hitmen to carry out extra judicial killings of alleged drug dealers while he was mayor of Davao — allegations that his office dismissed, even though, at that point, Duterte had already admitted to being part of a "death squad" in Davao.

Learn more about this controversial leader:

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Philippine leader Rodrigo Duterte
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Philippine leader Rodrigo Duterte
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte (C) clenches fist with members of the Philippine Army during his visit at the army headquarters in Taguig city, metro Manila, Philippines October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte gestures as he delivers a speech to the members of the Philippine Army during a visit at the army headquarters in Taguig city, metro Manila, Philippines October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte gestures as he delivers a speech to the members of the Philippine Army during a visit at the army headquarters in Taguig city, metro Manila, Philippines October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte shows a brochure of the new Glock pistols to be issued to members of the Philippine Army during a visit at the army headquarters in Taguig city, metro Manila, Philippines October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a news conference in Davao city, southern Philippines August 21, 2016. REUTERS/Lean Daval Jr/File Photo
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte (C) clenches fist with members of the Philippine Army during his visit at the army headquarters in Taguig city, metro Manila, Philippines October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte gestures while delivering a speech before female police officers during a gathering in Davao city, Philippines, September 30, 2016. Picture taken September 30, 2016. REUTERS/Lean Daval Jr TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Philippines' President Rodrigo Duterte (L) speaks during his meeting with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc in Hanoi, September 29, 2016. REUTERS/Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool
Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte leaves the opening ceremony of the ASEAN Summit in Vientiane, Laos September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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Since he was elected President in June, Duterte, who has compared himself to Hitler, has carried out a "war on drugs" that has led to the deaths of at least 5,927 people — many of whom were executed in what CNN calls "vigilante-style" killings, with no judicial process.

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump reportedly spoke with Duterte on the phone earlier this month — allegedly extending him an invitation to the White House.

Also see what drug rehab is like in the Philippines:

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What drug rehab looks like in the Philippines
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What drug rehab looks like in the Philippines
Drug users make coffins as part of a local government drug rehabilitation program in Olongapo city, northern Philippines, October 5, 2016. Drug users are taught carpentry skills and paid 5,000 Philippine pesos ($103) a month to build wooden coffins as part of the local government's livelihood and rehabilitation programme. The caskets, made of simple plywood and painted white, are provided to the poorest families in the city who are unable to afford funeral services, government officials said. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Former drug dependents undergoing rehabilitation make coffins as part of a local government drug rehabilitation program for people involved with drugs "Shabu" (Meth) in Olongapo city in northern Philippines, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Former drug dependents undergoing rehabilitation make coffins as part of a local government drug rehabilitation program for people involved with drugs "Shabu" (Meth) in Olongapo city in northern Philippines, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
Former drug dependents undergoing rehabilitation make coffins as part of a local government drug rehabilitation program for people involved with drugs "Shabu" (Meth) in Olongapo city in northern Philippines, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A former drug dependent undergoing rehabilitation makes coffins as part of a local government drug rehabilitation program for people involved with drugs "Shabu" (Meth) in Olongapo city in northern Philippines, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Erik De Castro
A drug user with a tattoo that reads: "You'll Never Walk Alone", is seen inside a classroom turned into a makeshift dormitory during a weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A guard checks on drug users sleeping inside a dormitory hall of Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, September 30, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users take part in a performance during a ceremony marking the completion of six months drug rehabilitation of 48 patients at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 11, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users who completed six months drug rehabilitation program receive a statue of Baby Jesus or St Nino at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 11, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Uniforms of drug users hang outside the isolation building, housing drug dependents at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center, in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 1, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users exercise at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 1, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users get computer training as part of a recovery training and livelihood project at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 6, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A newly-admitted drug user gets his head shaved at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 11, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A drug user, who took his baby hostage during a visit from his family, sits inside an isolation cell as a punishment for his behaviour at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 7, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users pray inside a chapel of Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 6, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A dentist prepares to extract a tooth of a drug user at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 6, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users sleep with their shirts over their heads during siesta at a dormitory for newly-arrived patients at Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, October 7, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A female drug user puts the finishing touches on her painting inside a dormitory hall of Central Luzon Drug Rehabilitation Center in Pampanga province, in northern Philippines, September 30, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A portrait of president Rodrigo Duterte hangs in a classroom occupied by drug users during a weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users who call themselves "Recovering Champions" are hosed with water as part of their weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Drug users who call themselves "Recovering Champions" crawl on mud as part of their weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users who call themselves "Recovering Champions" are blindfolded as part of their weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Drug users who call themselves "Recovering Champions" take a rest inside a classroom turned into a makeshift dormitory during a weekend drug rehabilitation program organised by the government of San Fernando, La Union, in northern Philippines, September 24, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. Around 700,000 drug users and pushers registered with authorities in a process termed "surrendering". REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A drug user holds a Bible before the start of a Yoga session at Center for Christian Recovery, a private drug rehabilitation center, in Antipolo, Rizal, in the Philippines, September 28, 2016. The soaring popularity of methamphetamine - a cheap and highly addictive drug à is overburdening health services and tearing families and communities apart in Southeast Asia, driving many countries to adopt hardline policies to fight the surge in narcotics use. REUTERS/Erik De Castro SEARCH "DRUG REHAB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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