Trump defies norms of the presidency

As a candidate, Donald Trump said he would move in new directions if he became president, and he is following through in a dramatic way, brushing aside many of the norms of the presidency and emphasizing different and unproven ways of conducting the office.

The latest example is his comment that he won't schedule the daily intelligence briefings that President Barack Obama and his predecessors have received for many years. Trump has received a few such briefings as president-elect, but hasn't been impressed, considering the briefings repetitive and of limited value, according to the New York Times. As a result, Trump has passed up the chance to have them regularly since he won the election Nov. 8. He said that as president he would have an intelligence briefing "when I need it."

RELATED: Trump's official picks for cabinet and administration positions

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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions
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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions

Counselor to the President: Kellyanne Conway

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Veterans Affairs Secretary: David Shulkin

(Photo credit DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Transportation secretary: Elaine Chao

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Energy secretary: Rick Perry

(Photo credit KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State: Rex Tillerson

 REUTERS/Daniel Kramer

Secretary of Defense: Retired Marine General James Mattis

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Chief of staff: Reince Priebus

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Chief strategist: Steve Bannon

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Attorney General: Senator Jeff Sessions

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Director of the CIA: Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Deputy national security adviser: K.T. McFarland

(Photo by Michael Schwartz/Getty Images)

White House counsel: Donald McGahn

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Ambassador to the United Nations: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley

(Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Education secretary: Betsy DeVos

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Commerce secretary: Wilbur Ross

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Homeland security secretary: General John Kelly

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Housing and urban development secretary: Ben Carson

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Administrator of Environmental Protection Agency: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Health and human services secretary: Tom Price

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Department of Homeland Security: Retired General John Kelly

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Secretary of agriculture: Sonny Perdue

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
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"You know, I'm, like, a smart person," he told Fox News in an interview broadcast Sunday. "I don't have to be told the same thing in the same words every single day for the next eight years."

He said he had told the officials who conduct the briefing, "If something should change from this point, immediately call me. I'm available on a one-minute notice."

He said he would assign his vice president Mike Pence to receive the daily intelligence briefing after the two of them take office Jan. 20.

Trump has also broken with past practice by publicly deriding the findings of U.S. intelligence in a high-profile case: the assessment that Russia had intervened in the election to help get him elected by hacking various computer systems, including those of supporters and senior aides of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Both the New York Times and Washington Post have reported that Russia took such covert action to harm Clinton's candidacy and elect Trump, with Russia leaking damaging correspondence involving Clinton.

Trump condemned those reports. "I think it's ridiculous," Trump told Fox. "I think it's just another excuse. I don't believe it....I think the Democrats are putting it out because they suffered one of the greatest defeats in the history of politics in this country."

A spokesman for Trump told the Times that the intelligence agencies are "the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction." This was a reason given by U.S. officials to go to war with Iraq while George W. Bush was president, but no such weapons were found.

Beyond the intelligence issues, Trump has been going his own way in a number of other areas as he prepares for his inauguration.

RELATED: Donald Trump's transition team takes over Washington D.C.
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Donald Trump's transition team takes over Washington D.C.
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Donald Trump's transition team takes over Washington D.C.
Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats wait for U.S. House Republicans on their seats as they arrive to a caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) smiles as he arrives for a caucus meeting the fellow House Republicans at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans depart with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats they were given at their caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Vice president-elect Mike Pence arrives at Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, NY, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Newly-elected freshman U.S. House members depart the steps of the U.S. Capitol after holding a class photo in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Rudy Giuliani, vice chairman of the Trump Presidential Transition Team, speaks at the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People watch Kellyanne Conway, campaign manager and senior advisor to the Trump Presidential Transition Team, speak on a monitor at the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) (C Right) and incoming Democratic Senators speak to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A White House staff member makes a list of questions asked of U.S. President Barack Obama during a news conference in the White House press briefing room in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Barack Obama holds a news conference in the White House press briefing room in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Barack Obama drinks some water between questions at a news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Congressional staffers set up U.S. flags during the 115th Congress Organizing Conference and Leadership Election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Representative-elect Anthony Brown (D-MD) (R) departs after a group picture with his fellow incoming freshman representatives on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Representative John Mica (R-FL) (C) and Representative Pete Sessions (R-TX) (R) speak with reporters as they depart with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats distributed at a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans arrive to hold party leadership elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Representative Peter King (R-NY) speaks with reporters as he departs with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats distributed at a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans stand for the Pledge of Allegiance before holding closed-door party leadership elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican staffers watch SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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He is intervening in the marketplace to prevent U.S. companies from exporting jobs abroad, which violates conservative orthodoxy even as affected workers tend to applaud Trump's interventions.

He is trying to sort out his vast corporate empire to minimize the chances for conflict of interest but resists divesting himself of major assets or placing his assets in a blind trust as other presidents have done.

His aides say he might continue playing a role in "The New Celebrity Apprentice" by serving as executive producer of the TV series that he once hosted. An aide suggested that he could do this in his leisure time, instead of playing golf as President Obama has done. His potential duties as executive producer aren't known.

He is second-guessing plans by the Air Force and the Boeing company to build two new 747 jets that would eventually be used as Air Force One. Trump says the cost appears to be excessive.

He rarely holds news conferences, preferring to write terse remarks on Twitter, which is a form of communication unfiltered by the media.

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