This neo-Nazi group is set to become the first to be banned for terrorism in the UK




A neo-Nazi movement which celebrated the brutal murder of Labour MP Jo Cox earlier this year is poised to become the first far-right group to be banned as a terrorist organization in the UK.

SEE ALSO: Jo Cox murder suspect gives name as 'Death to traitors, freedom for Britain' in court

Being a member or supporter of National Action will become a criminal offense under the Terrorism Act 2000, if an order by the Home Secretary Amber Rudd is approved by parliament.

Rudd called National Action a "racist, antisemitic and homophobic" organization which has no place in British society.

"I am clear that the safety and security of our families, communities and country comes first," she said. "So today I am taking action to proscribe the neo-Nazi group National Action. This will mean that being a member of, or inviting support for, this organization will be a criminal offense."

The decision was taken before the trial of Thomas Mair, the man who was sentenced for the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox, according to Rudd.

RELATED: More on Jo Cox

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Britain pays tribute to slain lawmaker Jo Cox
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Britain pays tribute to slain lawmaker Jo Cox
Prime Minister David Cameron and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn lay flowers while Shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn and Commons Speaker John Bercow look on in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
Flowers left at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Flowers left at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (centre) speaks to the media during an impromptu vigil at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
People hug each other during an impromptu vigil at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
A message left by Mary Creagh in Birstall, West Yorkshire, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in the town.
Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and deputy leader Tom Watson (rear) arrive to leave tributes at Parliament Square, opposite the Palace of Westminster in central London, following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
A woman lays some flowers at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in tribute to Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
A woman lays some flowers at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in tribute to Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
People stop to look at tributes left at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in respect to Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
People writing messages of tribute at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in respect of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Tribute messages at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in respect of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
People look at tributes at Parliament Square opposite the Palace of Westminster, central London, in respect of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Mary Creagh (left) and Caroline Flint (second right) leave St Peter's Church Birstall, West Yorkshire after a vigil following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
A general view of a sign for Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
Floral tributes are left in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
Yvette Cooper (second left) leaves St Peter's Church Birstall, West Yorkshire after a vigil following the death of Labour MP Jo Cox, who died after being shot and stabbed in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
The Union flag at half-mast on top of Portcullis House, London, with Queen Elizabeth Tower in the background, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Labour party general secretary Iain McNicol (right) and John Cryer MP leave floral tributes in Parliament Square, London, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery in Birstall, West Yorkshire.
Reverend Paul Knight, the vicar of Birstall, reads messages of condolence written by Prime Minister David Cameron and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn in a book of remembrance for Jo Cox in St Peter's church in the West Yorkshire town, after the Labour MP was shot and stabbed to death outside her constituency advice surgery.
Previously unissued picture dated 21/11/2006 of Jo Cox (red scarf), Andrew Mitchell (centre left) and David Cameron (centre right) during a visit to Darfur in the Sudan as part of the Conservative leader's two day tour of the region.
Left to right: Shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn, Commons Speaker John Bercow, Prime Minister David Cameron, Speaker's chaplain Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn arrive to lay flowers in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
Prime Minister David Cameron and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn lay flowers in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks to the media after he and other senior politicians laid flowers in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
People lay flowers in Birstall, West Yorkshire, after Labour MP Jo Cox was shot and stabbed to death in the street outside her constituency advice surgery.
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Mair's infamous phrase "Death to traitors, freedom for Britain!", which he uttered in court, appears alongside National Action's website entry on Google.

National Action has been putting up posters across Liverpool and Newbury calling them "Nazi-controlled white zones."

They held demos in UK cities with banners saying "Hitler was right" and speakers talking about "the disease of international Jewry" and "when the time comes they'll be in the chambers".

One of these "white man marches" ended abruptly when hundreds of white supremacists attempted to march through Liverpool and were surrounded by anti-fascist protesters inside the main station and unable to move.

The group was established about three years ago and is estimated to have about 100 members, according to the campaign group Hope not Hate.

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