Harry Reid: 'Partisan' Comey 'ignored' reports of Russian meddling and 'single-handedly' cost Clinton the election

Outgoing Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid lambasted FBI Director James Comey in a Monday interview with CNN, claiming that Comey "single-handedly" cost Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton the election.

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Comey had released a letter to congressional leaders less than two weeks ahead of the election announcing that authorities had discovered additional emails related to the investigation into her use of a private server. The agency then announced days before the election that the additional emails would not alter its initial decision to not bring forth charges against the former secretary of state.

"Had he not written that letter a week or so before the election, she would've won," Reid said. "We would've picked up at least two more Senate seats."

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Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks on the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, stands next his official portrait during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. Reid, the tart-tongued ex-boxer known for pugilistic rhetoric about Republicans, is marking the end of his 34-year career in Congress with the unveiling of his official portrait that was painted by former Senate staffer Gavin Glakas. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, speaks during a news conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Hillary Clinton pulled out a victory over Bernie Sanders in Nevadas Democratic caucuses that will help right her campaign as both candidates head into a 10-day blitz of crucial contests starting next Saturday in South Carolina.

(Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks with reporters regarding a stop-gap funding bill to avoid a federal government shutdown later this week on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 23: U.S. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks at a campaign rally with U.S. President Barack Obama for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Cheyenne High School on October 23, 2016 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Obama urged Nevadans to vote early one day after a record-breaking start to early voting in the swing state with almost 40,000 people going to the polls ahead of the November 8 general election. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 01: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks at a get-out-the-vote rally featuring first lady Michelle Obama at Canyon Springs High School November 1, 2010 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Recent polls show Reid, who is seeking his fifth term, four points behind Republican challenger Sharron Angle. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES â SEPTEMBER 22: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., participates in the Senate Democrats' news conference in the Capitol on Thursday Sept. 22, 2011, to urge House Republicans to fully fund disaster relief. (Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) appears on 'Meet the Press' Sunday, Jan 9, 2011 at his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.. (Photo by Stephen J. Boitano/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 03: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) talks to reporters after the weekly Democratic Senate policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol February 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid is wearing a bandage over his right eye after undergoing surgery to repair damage from an exercise accident. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-AZ) speaks during a pen and pad session with reporters at the US Capitol January 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid spoke about the injury he suffered over the Christmas break and talked about issues before the US Senate. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., makes his way through the Senate Reception Room after the senate luncheons on his first day in the Capitol since injuring himself in a exercise accident, January 20, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Senate Minority Leader Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) leaves a meeting with Senate Democrats on Capitol Hill January 20, 2015 in Washington, DC. Reid returned to work at the US Capitol on Tuesday for the first time since suffering injuries in an exercise accident in late December at his Las Vegas-area home. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. Reid, the U.S. Senate's top Democrat, will have surgery next Monday to try to restore full vision to his right eye. Reid suffered three broken ribs, a concussion and broken facial bones near his right eye socket in a New Year's Day accident. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images ** Local Caption *** Harry Reid
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The Nevada Democrat also criticized Comey for not taking a stronger stance against reported Russian meddling in the US election, of which the Washington Post and New York Times reported Friday that an assessment by the CIA concluded that Russia interfered in the election to help Trump's presidential bid.

"They ignored it," said Reid, who wrote a letter to Comey regarding Russian intervention ahead of the election. "The FBI director didn't have the decency, the courtesy, to even respond to my letter."

He said the response he got from a lower-level official "said they were looking into it," but "they looked into nothing."

Calling Comey a "partisan," Reid doubled-down on his assertion that Comey "ignored" intelligence that pointed toward Russia's involvement in the hacking of emails from members of the Democratic National Committee and Clinton's campaign from WikiLeaks.

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This is the Naval Academy yearbook picture of a former president, can you guess who it is?

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This precious portrait was taken in the 1800's, do you recognize that face?

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ANSWER: Franklin Delano Roosevelt

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The president pictured here is posing with his older brother.

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ANSWER: George H. W. Bush & George W. Bush

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"It was obvious," Reid said. "There is information out there, he had it ... and he ignored it."

The effort from WikiLeaks was "all directed to hurt Clinton" and "they certainly didn't leak any information" regarding Republican organizations and campaigns.

Asked about his past intense criticism of Trump, Reid said he stood by all of his prior statements, asking "what's wrong" with any of them. But, he said, Trump "doesn't appear to be as bad as I thought he would be.

"Well, he said he's going to try and help the Dreamers, he has shut up about the fence, he appears to be somebody who's trying to not be as crazy as his election," he said, adding, "He's still bad, but not as bad as I thought he would be."

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