Surgeon General issues stark warning about vaping

By Sean Dowling, Buzz60

The U.S. Surgeon General is urging young people to stop using e-cigarettes, calling them a public health threat in a new report.

The report says not enough research has been done to show e-cigarettes are harmless.

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy says too many teens are using them and no matter how it's delivered, nicotine is addictive.

The safety of e-cigarettes has been debated; most devices heat liquid nicotine to create a vapor, but because they don't have tar like traditional cigarettes, some say they're safer.

What can't be argued is that nicotine is bad for a developing brain.

Federal health officials say about 3 million young people use e-cigarettes, but it is illegal to sell them to minors.

The new report suggests the devices be on a list of indoor smoke-free policies.

Learn more about e-cigarettes:

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LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 27: E-Cigarettes are sold at the V-Revolution E-Cigarette shop in Covent Garden on August 27, 2014 in London, England. The Department of Health have ruled out the outlawing of 'e-cigs' in enclosed spaces in England, despite calls by WHO, The World Health Organisation to do so. WHO have recommended a ban on indoor smoking of e-cigs as part of tougher regulation of products dangerous to children. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 27: Different flavours for E-Cigarettes are sold at the V-Revolution E-Cigarette shop in Covent Garden on August 27, 2014 in London, England. The Department of Health have ruled out the outlawing of 'e-cigs' in enclosed spaces in England, despite calls by WHO, The World Health Organisation to do so. WHO have recommended a ban on indoor smoking of e-cigs as part of tougher regulation of products dangerous to children. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
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