Green Party's Stein drops Pennsylvania presidential recount bid

Dec 3 (Reuters) - Green Party candidate Jill Stein abruptly dropped her bid to seek a recount of the presidential election vote in Pennsylvania after a judge ordered her campaign to post a $1 million bond, a spokesman said on Saturday.

"Petitioners are regular citizens of ordinary means. They cannot afford to post the $1,000,000 bond required by the court," an attorney for the Stein campaign wrote in court papers, according to an email from spokesman Sam Scarrow.

"How odd is it that we must jump through bureaucratic hoops and raise millions of dollars so we can trust our election results?" Stein said on Twitter.

The campaign of Republican President-elect Donald Trump had requested a $10 million bond, court papers showed.

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Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein speaks to supporters during a rally outside the Wells Fargo Center on the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein speaks during a rally of Bernie Sanders supporters outside the Wells Fargo Center on the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter
Presumptive presidential candidate for the Green Party Dr. Jill Stein speaks at a cafe near the campus of the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio July 18, 2016. REUTERS/William Philpott
Presumptive 2016 Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein is surrounded by police and supporters of 'Black Men for Bernie' of former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders as she makes her exit after a rally during the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 27, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / Patrick T. Fallon (Photo credit should read PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26: Green Patry Presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein speaks to pro-Bernie Sanders supporters outside City Hall in Philadelphia on July 26, 2016. Many Sanders supporters are saying they will vote for Stein rather than vote for Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein speaks at the National Press Club February 6, 2015 in Washington, DC. Stein announced the formation of an exploratory committee to seek the Green Party's presidential nomination again in 2016. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 23: Jill Stein waits to speak before announcing that she will seek the Green Party's presidential nomination, at the National Press Club, June 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. Stein also ran for president in 2012 on the Green Party ticket. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Stein, who garnered only about 1 percent of the vote, has also sought recounts in Michigan and Wisconsin, saying that she wants to ensure the integrity of the U.S. voting system.

Trump, who beat Democrat Hillary Clinton in the Nov. 8 election, has called the recount effort a "scam."

Clinton's campaign has said it would take part in the recounts.

Even if all of the recounts were to take place, they are extremely unlikely to change the overall outcome of the election.

The presidential race is decided by the Electoral College, or a tally of wins from the state-by-state contests, rather than by the popular national vote.

Trump surpassed the 270 electoral votes needed to win, with 306 electoral votes, and the recount would have to flip the result to Clinton in all three states to change the overall result.

In the popular vote, Clinton had a margin of more than 2.5 million votes over Trump, the Cook Political Report said.

(Reporting by Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Bill Rigby and Tom Brown)


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