David Petraeus would have to inform his probation officer if Trump hires him as secretary of state

Former CIA Director David Petraeus would need to notify his probation officer if he is chosen as President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state, according to court documents cited by CNN and USA Today on Wednesday.

The documents stipulate that Petraeus, who is serving two years' probation after pleading guilty to charges of mishandling classified information, would have three days to inform his probation officer about his new job.

If hired by Trump and confirmed by Congress, Petraeus would also have to get approval from a court or his probation officer before he can travel out of North Carolina for work, and submit to periodic, warrantless searches of his property and electronic devices, according to the court documents.

See David Petraeus through the years:

21 PHOTOS
Former CIA Director David Petraeus through the years
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Former CIA Director David Petraeus through the years

Former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (DCIA) under President Barack Obama, Gen. David Petraeus interviewed for the documentary, 'The Spymasters,' about CIA Directors for CBS/Showtime. With producers Chris Whipple, Gedeon and Jules Naudet, New York, New York, July 22, 2015.

(Photo David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

Director, President and CEO of The Woodrow Wilson Center Hon. Jane Harman and Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency Gen. (Ret.) David H. Petraeus speak at the 2016 Concordia Summit - Day 1 at Grand Hyatt New York on September 19, 2016 in New York City.

(Photo by Ben Hider/Getty Images for Concordia Summit)

Robert DeNiro, Harvey Keitel and General David Petraeus attend the 2nd Annual Speyer Legacy School Access To Opportunity Initiative Benefit at Carnegie Hall on April 6, 2016 in New York City.

(Photo by Bobby Bank/WireImage)

Former CIA director David Petraeus speaks after leaving the Federal Courthouse in Charlotte, North Carolina, April 23, 2015. Petraeus was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $100,000 fine after pleading guilty to mishandling classified information.

(REUTERS/Chris Keane)

Director of the Central Intelligence Agency General David Petraeus attends the Allen & Co Media Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho July 12, 2012. Petraeus resigned as CIA director on November 9, 2012 he publicly admitted to having engaged in an extramarital affair. Picture taken July 12, 2012.

(REUTERS/Jim Urquhart)

In this handout image provided by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), former Commander of International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan; CIA Director Gen. Davis Petraeus shakes hands with biographer Paula Broadwell, co-author of 'All In: The Education of General David Petraeus' on July 13, 2011. CIA Director Gen. David Petraeus resigned from his post on November 9, 2012, citing an extra-marital affair with Paula Broadwell. The FBI began an investigation after it was tipped off by Jill Kelley, a long-time friend of the Petraeus family, who received threatening emails from Broadwell.

(Photo by ISAF via Getty Images)

Jill Kelley, General David Petraeus, Holly Petraeus, Jill Kelley and Scott Kelley (l.- r.) attending event in which Gen. Petraeus was presented with community service award at the home of Jill and Scott Kelley during summer of 2011.

(New York Daily News Exclusive via Getty Images)

US General David Petraeus (2nd L) attends a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Defence Minister Karl Theodor zu Guttenberg and Afghan President Hamid Karsai (not in picture) during an unannounced visit to the German Army's base in the Afghan city of Masar-i-Sharif on December 18, 2010.

(STEFFEN KUGLER/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One upon landing for an unscheduled visit to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan December 3, 2010, and is greeted by US commander in Afghanistan General David Petraeus and US Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl W. Eikenberry (behind).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S Army General David Petraeus, commander of the Multi-National Force in Iraq, testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, April 8, 2008. Petraeus said progress in Iraq is too "fragile and reversible'' to allow for U.S. troop levels to fall below about 140,000 earlier than September.

(Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

US Army General David Petraeus, incoming commander of US Central Command and former commanding general of the Multi-National Force in Iraq, interacts with other guest riders after returning to the White House following a bicycle ride with US President George W. Bush, in Washington, October 11, 2008.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. Army General David Petraeus throws out the first pitch prior to Game 2 of Major League Baseball's World Series between the Tampa Bay Rays and Philadelphia Phillies in St. Petersburg, Florida, October 23, 2008.

(REUTERS/Scott Audette)

U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) listens as U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus provides a situation update on Iraq to a congressional delegation in Baghdad, July 21, 2008. Obama and other members of the delegation met with Iraqi leaders and U.S. military commanders in a visit overshadowed by the question of when U.S. troops should go home.

(REUTERS/Lorie Jewell/Multi-National Forces Iraq Public Affairs/Handout)

U.S. President George W. Bush speaks to reporters following a meeting on the war in Iraq at the White House in Washington October 5, 2005. Standing with Bush are the former commander of the multi-national security and transition command U.S. Army Major General David H. Petraeus (L) and U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

General David Petraeus, the three-star U.S. General charged with overseeing the transition of power from the Coalition military authorities to the Iraqis poses June 21, 2004 in Najaf, Iraq.

(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images)

U.S. Lt. General David Petraeus, commander of the 101st. Airborne Division shakes hands with an Iraqi Army soldier celebrating his graduation in Kirkush Military Training base, July 8, 2004. Columns of 720 soldiers of the newly U.S-trained Iraqi Army celebrated their graduation on Thursday as part of U.S initial plan of creating a new Iraqi army division numbering 12,000 troops within a year to replace 400,000-strong army dispended by the U.S led coalition authority after the fall of Baghdad on April 2003.

(Zohra Bensemra / Reuters)

Paul Bremer (L), the the U.S. administrator for Iraq listens to US Commander Maj. Gen. David Petraeus upon his arrival at Mosul airport in northern Iraq before a short helicopter tour of the city 18 May 2003. The U.S. administrator for Iraq, Paul Bremer, said on Sunday he was pushing ahead with setting up an Iraqi interim authority, denying media reports that Washington was suspending the transition process.

(REUTERS/Roberto Schmidt/POOL JV)

In this handout photo from the U.S. Army, Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), speaks during the 716th Military Police Battalion during a assumption of command ceremony November 2, 2003 in Babylon, Iraq. Lt. Col. Ashton L. Hayes took command of the battalion after former commander Lt. Col. Kim S. Orlando was killed Oct. 16 in Karbala, Iraq.

(Photo by Chris Jones/U.S. Army via Getty Images)

Major General David Petraeus, commander of the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne division meets with local Kurd and Arab leaders July 26, 2003 in the ethnically mixed town of Domiz, in northern Iraq. Petraeus was the guest of honor at a dinner hosted by the leaders and participated in a ribbon cutting ceremony for a new hospital clinic built with the aid of the U.S. Army there.

(Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)

David H. Petraeus got a diploma from the U.S. Military Academy and the boss's daughter as well. The cadet captain and assistant brigade adjutant, who comes from Cornwall-On-The-Hudson, New York, is to marry Holly Knowlton, daughter of West Point Superintendent Lt. General William Knowlton.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

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Petraeus is reportedly one of four candidates in the running for the secretary of state position, along with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chair Bob Corker, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly.

Learn more about President-elect Trump's appointments so far:

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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions
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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions

Counselor to the President: Kellyanne Conway

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Veterans Affairs Secretary: David Shulkin

(Photo credit DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Transportation secretary: Elaine Chao

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Energy secretary: Rick Perry

(Photo credit KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State: Rex Tillerson

 REUTERS/Daniel Kramer

Secretary of Defense: Retired Marine General James Mattis

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Chief of staff: Reince Priebus

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Chief strategist: Steve Bannon

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Attorney General: Senator Jeff Sessions

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Director of the CIA: Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Deputy national security adviser: K.T. McFarland

(Photo by Michael Schwartz/Getty Images)

White House counsel: Donald McGahn

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Ambassador to the United Nations: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley

(Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Education secretary: Betsy DeVos

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Commerce secretary: Wilbur Ross

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Homeland security secretary: General John Kelly

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Housing and urban development secretary: Ben Carson

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Administrator of Environmental Protection Agency: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Health and human services secretary: Tom Price

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Department of Homeland Security: Retired General John Kelly

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Secretary of agriculture: Sonny Perdue

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
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