Trump's inaugural committee offers 'candlelight dinner' to big money donors

According to a brochure obtained by The Center for Public Integrity, Trump's inaugural committee is offering some big perks in exchange for big donations at the inauguration come January.

For example, anyone who contributes a million dollars or more will receive tickets to a slew of inauguration week events, including a "candlelight dinner" with special appearances by the president and vice president-elect and their wives.

More from Newsy: Trump Can Thank His Predecessors For Expanding Executive Power

Now if you actually want to eat dinner with Mike Pence, the top package includes an "intimate" dining experience with him and his wife.

RELATED: Trump's official picks for cabinet and administration positions

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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions
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Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions

Counselor to the President: Kellyanne Conway

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Veterans Affairs Secretary: David Shulkin

(Photo credit DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Transportation secretary: Elaine Chao

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Energy secretary: Rick Perry

(Photo credit KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State: Rex Tillerson

 REUTERS/Daniel Kramer

Secretary of Defense: Retired Marine General James Mattis

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Chief of staff: Reince Priebus

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Chief strategist: Steve Bannon

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Attorney General: Senator Jeff Sessions

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Director of the CIA: Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Deputy national security adviser: K.T. McFarland

(Photo by Michael Schwartz/Getty Images)

White House counsel: Donald McGahn

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Ambassador to the United Nations: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley

(Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Education secretary: Betsy DeVos

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Commerce secretary: Wilbur Ross

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Homeland security secretary: General John Kelly

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Housing and urban development secretary: Ben Carson

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Administrator of Environmental Protection Agency: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Health and human services secretary: Tom Price

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Department of Homeland Security: Retired General John Kelly

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Secretary of agriculture: Sonny Perdue

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
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And, of course, you'll get VIP access to the inaugural ball, concert, parade and victory reception, among other exclusive benefits.

But if you don't have an extra million dollars, fear not. Underwriters who donate between $500,000 and $25,000 can still score tickets to some of the events above, depending on the price they're willing to pay.

Trump's inaugural committee reportedly wants to raise between $65 million and $75 million to fund the inauguration festivities. But taxpayers will still foot a good portion of the bill for items like security and the actual swearing-in ceremony.

Still, that fundraising goal is a lot more than President Barack Obama's total in 2013. He scraped together about $43 million when it was all said and done.

Trump's inaugural committee has confirmed the details of these perks but also said they could change before the event.

RELATED: Trump's transition team takes over D.C.

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Donald Trump's transition team takes over Washington D.C.
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Donald Trump's transition team takes over Washington D.C.
Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats wait for U.S. House Republicans on their seats as they arrive to a caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) smiles as he arrives for a caucus meeting the fellow House Republicans at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans depart with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats they were given at their caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Vice president-elect Mike Pence arrives at Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, NY, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Newly-elected freshman U.S. House members depart the steps of the U.S. Capitol after holding a class photo in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Rudy Giuliani, vice chairman of the Trump Presidential Transition Team, speaks at the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People watch Kellyanne Conway, campaign manager and senior advisor to the Trump Presidential Transition Team, speak on a monitor at the Wall Street Journal CEO Council in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) (C Right) and incoming Democratic Senators speak to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A White House staff member makes a list of questions asked of U.S. President Barack Obama during a news conference in the White House press briefing room in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Barack Obama holds a news conference in the White House press briefing room in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Barack Obama drinks some water between questions at a news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Congressional staffers set up U.S. flags during the 115th Congress Organizing Conference and Leadership Election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Representative-elect Anthony Brown (D-MD) (R) departs after a group picture with his fellow incoming freshman representatives on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Representative John Mica (R-FL) (C) and Representative Pete Sessions (R-TX) (R) speak with reporters as they depart with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats distributed at a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans arrive to hold party leadership elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Representative Peter King (R-NY) speaks with reporters as he departs with Trump campaign "Make America Great Again" hats distributed at a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. House Republicans stand for the Pledge of Allegiance before holding closed-door party leadership elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican staffers watch SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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