Secret government shelters, bunkers and hideaways hidden across the US

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There's a lot more secrecy in U.S. politics than we think -- and that also extends to the protection of the nation's most powerful leaders.

When John F. Kennedy began his presidency at the height of the Cold War, a secret bunker was constructed for him on Peanut Island. The dingy, steel fallout shelter was made to protect the leader if disaster struck.

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Secret spaces and protection for politicians
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Secret spaces and protection for politicians

Peanut Island

Guests, led by curator Ruth Pelletier, enter the cold-war era nuclear fallout shelter constructed for U.S. President John F. Kennedy on Peanut Island near Riviera Beach, Florida November 8, 2013. The dingy, cavernous steel fallout shelter hastily built on a man-made island off Florida's east coast is a stark reminder of the harsh realities President John F. Kennedy faced from the first days of his presidency at the height of the Cold War.

(REUTERS/Joe Skipper)

Peanut Island

A hallway is shown with a generator at the far end in the cold-war era nuclear fallout shelter constructed for U.S. President John F. Kennedy on Peanut Island near Riviera Beach, Florida November 8, 2013. The dingy, cavernous steel fallout shelter hastily built on a man-made island off Florida's east coast is a stark reminder of the harsh realities President John F. Kennedy faced from the first days of his presidency at the height of the Cold War.

(REUTERS/Joe Skipper)

The Situation Room

U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, along with members of the national security team, receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House, May 1, 2011.

(REUTERS/White House/Pete Souza/Handout/File Photo)

The Situation Room

A photo from December 19, 2006 photo shows a newly renovated White House Situation Room, underneath the West Wing of the White House in Washington, DC. The room is used by the president and his advisors to monitor crisis around the world.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Situation Room

The newly renovated White House Situation Room complex in the basement of the West Wing of the White House is seen during a tour given to news photographers in Washington May 18, 2007.

(REUTERS/Yuri Gripas)

The Situation Room

The newly renovated White House Situation Room is seen from the perspective of the president of the United States' chair during a tour given to news photographers in Washington May 18, 2007.

(REUTERS/Yuri Gripas)

White House Press Room

Members of the news media go through a trap door, which leads to an unused swimming pool, under the podium in the press briefing room of the White House in Washington on August 2, 2006. The press room, which was built on top of an unused swimming pool, was demolished for major renovations.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

White House Press Room

Fox News White House correspondent Greg Kelly looks up from a little-known trap door inside the White House Press Room on August 3, 2006 in Washington, DC. The door, now filled with tv cables and equipment, lead down to what was once the West Wing swimming pool area. Before the press room underwent major renovation correspondents and reporters signed the walls for posterity.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

President's Emergency Operations Center (PEOC)

In this handout photo provided by the U.S. National Archives, senior staff watch President George W. Bush speak on television from the President's Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 in Washington, DC.  The PEOC is an underground facility beneath the East Wing of the White House that can stand up against powerful blasts or explosions.

(Photo by David Bohrer/U.S. National Archives via Getty Images)

President's Emergency Operations Center (PEOC)

In this handout photo provided by the U.S. National Archives, Vice President Dick Cheney meets with senior staff in the President's Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by David Bohrer/U.S. National Archives via Getty Images)

The Greenbrier 

The West Tunnel Blast Door, which weighs 25 tons and serves as an entrance to a former government relocation facility, also know as 'the bunker,' at Greenbrier Resort July 14, 2006 in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The bunker, codenamed 'Project Greek Island' and planned by the Eisenhower Administration, was a 112,000 square-foot shelter constructed beneath the Greenbrier Resort's West Virginia Wing, to serve as a relocation site for members of the U.S. Congress and associated staff in the event of a nuclear attack on the U.S. soil. The facility was built between 1958 and 1961 and was maintained in a state of operational readiness until the government terminated the lease with the resort in 1995. The bunker was later reopened for public tours after a two-year-long renovation.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The Greenbrier 

The setup of the Communication Room of a former government relocation facility, also know as the 'bunker,' is on display at the facility at Greenbrier Resort July 14, 2006 in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The bunker, codenamed 'Project Greek Island' and planned by the Eisenhower Administration, was a 112,000 square-foot shelter constructed beneath the Greenbrier Resort's West Virginia Wing, to serve as a relocation site for members of the U.S. Congress and associated staff in the event of a nuclear attack on the U.S. soil. The facility was built between 1958 and 1961 and was maintained in a state of operational readiness until the government terminated the lease with the resort in 1995.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Nike Missile Site

Ryan Meyer, Nike Missile Site Coordinator for Everglades National Park, stands next to a door leading to a bunker attached to one of three facilities that were used to store and potentially launch both conventional and nuclear tipped Nike missiles in reaction to any Russian attack in the Everglades National Park on April 8, 2010 near Everglades City, Florida. As U.S. President Barack Obama and President Dmitri A. Medvedev of Russia sign their nuclear arms control treaty today, relics like this former missile site are a reminder of how far the relationship between the United States and Russia has come. The missile base was built by the United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1963 at the height of the Cold War and was finally closed in 1979. Former workers whom the park service has interviewed say the site contained nuclear tip warheads that were ready to be fired if needed.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Air Force One

Air Force one is one if the most secure planes in the world. The Boeing 747 is as tall as a 6-story building and has armored windows. According to Business Insider the body of the plane can also withstand a nuclear blast from the ground. This pictures from 2013 shows President Obama and President Bush aboard Air Force One on their way to a memorial service for Nelson Mandela.

(Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Camp David

This camp, built by the CCC as a recreational center near Thurmont, Maryland, was used by Franklin Roosevelt as a retreat he called 'Shangri-La'. President Eisenhower extensively remodeled it, and renamed it Camp David. It is heavily guarded by U.S. Marines and is rarely seen by the public.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Camp David

Camp David was one of several 'undisclosed locations' used after the September 11th terror attacks. In this picture former U.S. President George W. Bush meets with his National Security advisors via videoconference at Camp David, September 22, 2001."The terrorists who attacked the United States on September 11 targeted our economy as well as our people," Bush said in his weekly radio address. "They brought down a symbol of American prosperity but they could not touch its source." Also pictured from left, are: White House Chief of Staff Andy Card, CIA Director George Tenant and National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice.

(REUTERS/White House/Eric Draper ED/SV)

Oval Office Resolute Desk

One of the most iconic pictures from the White House also features one of the best hiding places for young children. Former United States President John F. Kennedy is pictured sitting as his desk in the Oval Office while his son, John F. Kennedy Jr., looks out from underneath. The hinged front door of the desk was originally added by former President Franklin D. Roosevelt to hide his leg braces.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

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And that's not all -- an iconic 1963 photo of Kennedy and his young son reveals a secret door under the Oval Office desk. Who knew?

Check out other mysterious hideaways in the slideshow above.

RELATED: U.S. presidents in their younger days:

44 PHOTOS
US presidents in their younger days
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US presidents in their younger days

This is the Naval Academy yearbook picture of a former president, can you guess who it is?

Click through to reveal the answer.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Jimmy Carter

(Photo by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)

This precious portrait was taken in the 1800's, do you recognize that face?

Click through for the answer. 

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Franklin Delano Roosevelt

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This president served as a five-star general before his time in the White Hosue.

(Photo by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Dwight Eisenhower 

(Photo by Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

The president pictured here is posing with his older brother.

Did that hint help? Click through for another one.

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

Here is another picture of that president at a young age.

(Photo by John Springer Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Ronald Reagan

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Can you guess who this young high school student is?

Click through to reveal the answer.

(Photo by Getty Images)

ANSWER: Bill Clinton

(REUTERS/Dominick Reuter)

This adorable six-month-old would later become President of the United States, click through to see who.

(Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Harry Truman

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This teen violinist went on to serve as president for two terms.

(Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Richard Nixon

(Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

Can you guess who this ten-year-old boy is?

Click to the next picture to see if you were right.

(Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images).

ANSWER: Theodore Roosevelt 

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This picture is from 1964.

Click through to see who this dapper teenager is.

(Copy Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

ANSWER: George W. Bush

(REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

When this picture was taken this future president was 21-years-old and owned a newspaper.

(Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Warren G Harding  

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This little 18-month-old grew up in Texas.

Click through to see who it is.

 (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Lyndon B. Johnson

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

This nine-year-old future president was born in 1917.

 (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: John F. Kennedy

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This Naval Aviator Cadet is also a US president.

(REUTERS/Handout)

ANSWER: George H. W. Bush

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

This well-dressed future president was born in Nebraska.

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Gerald Ford

(Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

This young basketball star would go on to serve two terms as president.

(Photo by Laura S. L. Kong/Getty Images)

This portrait features a US president who worked as a mining engineer before his time in the White House.

(Photo by Philipp Kester/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Herbert Hoover

(Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Barack Obama

(Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

This young man went on to become the 30th president of the United States.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Calvin Coolidge 

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This president served as a lieutenant in the Mexican-American War.

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Ulysses S. Grant 

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This handsome young man would go on to serve two terms as POTUS.

(Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Woodrow Wilson

(Photo by: Liverani/Andia/UIG via Getty Images)

This sixteen-year-old boy would go on to become the 20th President of the United States.

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: James Garfield

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Can you pick out the president in this picture?

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: George H. W. Bush & George W. Bush

The picture was the father and son at Yale University when George Bush Jr. was a baby.

(REUTERS/Mike Stone)

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