Newt Gingrich goes in on Romney, accuses him of 'sucking up' to Trump for secretary of state job

Newt Gingrich sounded off Wednesday on Mitt Romney's latest meeting with President-elect Donald Trump about the secretary of state post.

Gingrich appeared on conservative radio host Laura Ingraham's show Wednesday and implied that Romney is "sucking up" to Trump to get the job.

"You have never, ever, in your career seen a wealthy adult who is independent, has been a presidential candidate, suck up at the rate that Mitt Romney is sucking up," Gingrich said.

10 PHOTOS
Donald Trump and Mitt Romney meet
See Gallery
Donald Trump and Mitt Romney meet
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
US President-elect Donald Trump (L) dines with Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges restaurant at Trump International Hotel and Tower, Tuesday, November 29, 2016 in New York. Romney, a favorite among establishment Republicans for being named Secretary of State, met with Trump for their second face-to-face meeting in 10 days. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The former House speaker is a vocal supporter of Trump and was at one point a contender to be Trump's running mate. But he has been one of the members of Trump's inner circle to push back on the idea of Romney as secretary of state.

Gingrich continued:

"I am confident that he thinks now that he and Donald Trump are the best of friends, they have so many things in common. That they're both such wise, brilliant people. And I'm sure last night at an elegant three-star restaurant, he was happy to share his version of populism, which involve a little foie gras, a certain amount of superb cooking, but put that in a populist happy manner."

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee, is apparently still among the top four people under consideration for the secretary of state role. His candidacy has rubbed a few early Trump loyalists the wrong way.

On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that the search was down to five candidates: 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chair Bob Corker, former CIA Director David Petraeus, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly. Trump was meeting with Kelly on Wednesday.

Listen to Gingrich's interview below:

RELATED: U.S. presidents in their younger days:

44 PHOTOS
US presidents in their younger days
See Gallery
US presidents in their younger days

This is the Naval Academy yearbook picture of a former president, can you guess who it is?

Click through to reveal the answer.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Jimmy Carter

(Photo by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)

This precious portrait was taken in the 1800's, do you recognize that face?

Click through for the answer. 

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Franklin Delano Roosevelt

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This president served as a five-star general before his time in the White Hosue.

(Photo by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Dwight Eisenhower 

(Photo by Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

The president pictured here is posing with his older brother.

Did that hint help? Click through for another one.

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

Here is another picture of that president at a young age.

(Photo by John Springer Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Ronald Reagan

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Can you guess who this young high school student is?

Click through to reveal the answer.

(Photo by Getty Images)

ANSWER: Bill Clinton

(REUTERS/Dominick Reuter)

This adorable six-month-old would later become President of the United States, click through to see who.

(Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Harry Truman

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This teen violinist went on to serve as president for two terms.

(Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Richard Nixon

(Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

Can you guess who this ten-year-old boy is?

Click to the next picture to see if you were right.

(Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images).

ANSWER: Theodore Roosevelt 

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This picture is from 1964.

Click through to see who this dapper teenager is.

(Copy Photo by Darren McCollester/Newsmakers)

ANSWER: George W. Bush

(REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

When this picture was taken this future president was 21-years-old and owned a newspaper.

(Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Warren G Harding  

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This little 18-month-old grew up in Texas.

Click through to see who it is.

 (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Lyndon B. Johnson

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

This nine-year-old future president was born in 1917.

 (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: John F. Kennedy

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

This Naval Aviator Cadet is also a US president.

(REUTERS/Handout)

ANSWER: George H. W. Bush

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

This well-dressed future president was born in Nebraska.

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Gerald Ford

(Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

This young basketball star would go on to serve two terms as president.

(Photo by Laura S. L. Kong/Getty Images)

This portrait features a US president who worked as a mining engineer before his time in the White House.

(Photo by Philipp Kester/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Herbert Hoover

(Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Barack Obama

(Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

This young man went on to become the 30th president of the United States.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Calvin Coolidge 

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This president served as a lieutenant in the Mexican-American War.

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: Ulysses S. Grant 

(Photo by Stock Montage/Stock Montage/Getty Images)

This handsome young man would go on to serve two terms as POTUS.

(Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

ANSWER: Woodrow Wilson

(Photo by: Liverani/Andia/UIG via Getty Images)

This sixteen-year-old boy would go on to become the 20th President of the United States.

(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

ANSWER: James Garfield

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Can you pick out the president in this picture?

(Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

ANSWER: George H. W. Bush & George W. Bush

The picture was the father and son at Yale University when George Bush Jr. was a baby.

(REUTERS/Mike Stone)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.