In America's 'Murder Zone', it's easy to get away with killing someone

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Yellowstone National Park sees over 3.5 million visitors each year -- and little do they know, they're setting foot near one of the most dangerous places on Earth.

According to Condé Nast Traveler, there's a narrow corridor within the park less than two miles wide where the law can't touch you.

It's called, appropriately, the Yellowstone Murder Zone.

Yellowstone is so large (roughly the size of Rhode Island) it technically includes part of three states -- Wyoming, Idaho and Montana.

Since most of the park is in Wyoming, Congress gave the state federal court district jurisdiction over the entire park.

That includes the tiny slivers of Idaho and Montana -- but there's a slight problem.

The Sixth Amendment of the Constitution requires criminal cases be tried by a jury of the state and district where the crime was committed.

See photos of U.S. National Parks:

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The beauty of the United States' National Parks
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The beauty of the United States' National Parks
Late afternoon view of Grand Canyon National Park, Cape Royal, North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA, (Photo by Wild Horizons/UIG via Getty Images)
USA Hawaii Big Island - magma of the Halema'uma'u (in Caldera des Kilauea, Volcanoes National Park) (Photo by Rolf Schulten/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Desert environment, Sand dunes, Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley national park, California, USA (Photo by: Geography Photos/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
A large container ship passes under the Golden Gate Bridge on April 1, 2014, in San Francisco, California. San Francisco continues to be a major global tourist destination and has experienced a real estate and high-tech boom in recent years. (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images)
Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming (Photo by ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Mount Rushmore National Memorial towers over the South Dakota landscape on October 1, 2013 near Keystone, South Dakota. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Spray from Oregon's most photographed waterfall, Proxy Falls, beautifies nearby logs and rocks with lush growths of moss, Three Sisters Wilderness, Willamette National Forest, Oregon, USA, (Photo by Wild Horizons/UIG via Getty Images)
USA, Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park, Teton Range, Pfeiffer's Homestead, Sagebrush. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin, Chromatic Springs. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
 Fireworks explode over the Statue of Liberty in celebration of the anniversary of its dedication on October 28, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Bass Harbor Lighthouse. (Photo by John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images)
USA, Alaska, Gates of the Arctic National Park, river valley with mountains in background. (Photo By DEA / M. SANTINI/De Agostini/Getty Images)
The sensitive ecological landscape of the Everglades National Park, home to many endangered and rare plants, is seen from the air on March 16, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
The moon and Venus shine beyond joshua trees under a storm-scoured sky in Joshua Tree National Monument, January 28, 2000, as a cold front moves out of southern California leaving snow in the desert and skies of blue. (Photo by David McNew/Newsmakers)
Because of excessive spring rains in 2005, the usually visible salt patterns in Badwater were covered with water for many weeks. (Photo by: MyLoupe/UIG via Getty Images)
USA, Northern California, Redwood National Park, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood Trees. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
USA, Alaska, Near Seward, Kenai Fjords Np, View Of Kenai Mountains. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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There's not a single person who comes from the 50 square miles of Yellowstone that is both part of the state of Idaho and the district in Wyoming, much less the 12 necessary to form a local jury.

So, technically, you could get away with murder.

In order to pull off the crime, you would have to do everything in the jurisdiction.

According to Condé Nast Traveler, you could not drive to Montana to buy a hired gun or email a hired killer from home. You have to do every single step of the murder in the spot.

Even then, you would have to be willing to serve up to six months on lesser charges that don't require a jury.

Read more about famous crimes:

23 PHOTOS
Most famous US crime trials over the past 25 years
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Most famous US crime trials over the past 25 years

OJ Simpson: Not guilty in the murder of wife Nicole Brown-Simpson and friend Ron Goldman

O.J. Simpson shows the jury a new pair of Aris extra-large gloves, similar to the gloves found at the Bundy and Rockingham crime scene 21 June during his double murder trial in Los Angeles. Deputy Sheriff Roland Jex (L) and Prosector Christopher Darden (R) look on.

(Photo credit AFP/Getty Images)

Casey Anthony: Not guilty in the murder of daughter Caylee Anthony

Casey Anthony (R) reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges at the Orange County Courthouse on July 5, 2011 in Orlando, Florida. At left is her attorney Jose Baez. Casey Anthony had been accused of murdering her two-year-old daughter Caylee in 2008. (Photo by Red Huber-Pool/Getty Images)

Scott Peterson: Sentenced to death for murder of pregnant wife, Laci Peterson

Scott Peterson listens to the prosecutor during his trial on charges in the murder of his wife, Laci Peterson, on January 4, 2004, in Modesto, California.

(Photo by Bart Ah You/Modesto Bee/MCT via Getty Images)

Martha Stewart: Guilty of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and making false statements to a federal investigator

Martha Stewart leaves US Federal Courthouse after being found guilty 05 March, 2004. The Multi-millionaire lifestyle guru was convicted on charges of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and two counts of making false statements to federal investigators. Each charge carries a maximum sentence of five years in jail. Stewart's stockbroker, Peter Bacanovic, was found guilty on the same counts, but cleared of a separate charge of making false documents. The jury of eight women and four men took a little over two days to reach their decision. Judge Miriam Cederbaum set sentencing for June 17.

(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Whitey Bulger: Guilty of racketeering leading to 11 murders

Former mob boss and fugitive James "Whitey" Bulger, who was arrested in Santa Monica, California on June 22, 2011 along with his longtime girlfriend Catherine Greig, is seen in a combination of booking mug photos released to Reuters on August 1, 2011. Bulger, currently on trial in Boston for murder and racketeering, has angrily cursed in open court, his own lawyer has described him as a mobster and one potential witness this week turned up dead on the side of a road. As prosecutors prepare to wrap up their case early next week and hand it over to the defense, the biggest question on observers' minds is whether the 83-year-old defendant will break with convention once more and take to the witness stand.

(REUTERS/U.S. Marshals Service/U.S. Department of Justice/Handout)

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev: Sentenced to death for involvement in the Boston Marathon bombing

A courtroom sketch shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (R) during the jury selection process in his trial at the federal courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts January 15, 2015. Tsarnaev, who appeared in court on Thursday wearing a sport jacket and collared shirt, more formally dressed than in last week's appearances, and had trimmed his hair, is also charged with fatally shooting a university police officer three days after the bombing. He has pleaded not guilty.

(REUTERS/Jane Flavell Collins)

Dylann Roof: Found guilty of killing nine black parishioners at Mother Emanuel church in South Carolina.

Dylann Storm Roof appears by closed-circuit television at his bond hearing in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. June 19, 2015 in a still image from video.

(REUTERS/POOL/File Photo)

Timothy McVeigh: Sentenced to death for involvement in the Oklahoma City bombing

Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh is shown being escorted from the Noble County Courthouse as he is transported to Oklahoma City for arraignment in this April 22, 1995 file photo. One year ago today, on June 11, 2001, McVeigh was executed after being sentenced to death for the bombing of a federal building in Oaklahome City, a crime that took 168 lives and shook a complacent America to the core.

(Photo by Jim Bourg / Reuters)

George Zimmerman: Acquitted of murder in the shooting of Trayvon Martin

George Zimmerman leaves the courtroom a free man after being found not guilty in the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin at the Seminole County Criminal Justice Center in Sanford, Florida, July 13, 2013. Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges on Saturday for the fatal shooting of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin in this central Florida town in February of last year.

(REUTERS/Joe Burbank/Pool)

Dr. Jack Kevorkian: Guilty of second-degree homicide for 'mercy killings' 

Dr. Jack Kevorkian is quiet after he was found guilty of second-degree murder and delivery of a controlled substance case in the death of Thomas Youk in a Oakland County Courtroom in Pontiac, March 26. Kevorkian was released on personal bond. 

(Reuters Photographer / Reuters)

Michael Jackson: Acquitted on child molestation charges

Michael Jackson leaves the courthouse after being found 'not-guilty' on all charges against him.

(Photo by Bob Riha Jr/WireImage)

Jeffrey Dahmer: Confessed to and was found guilty of 15 murders

Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer is escorted into a Milwaukee County Circuit Court by a Milwaukee County Sheriffs Deputy for his second appearance in this July, 1991, file photo. Dahmer was found guility of the murders of 16 young men, and sentenced to life in prison in February of 1992. 

(Photo via Reuters)

Lyle and Erik Menendez: Found guilty of murdering their parents

Erik Menendez (R) and brother Lyle listen to court proceedings during a May 17, 1991 appearance in the case of the shotgun murder of their wealthy parents in August 1989. The California Supreme Court must decide whether to review a lower court decision to allow alleged tape confessions made to a psychiatrist as evidence before a preliminary hearing can take place.

(REUTERS/Lee Celano)

Jodi Arias: Found guilty in murder of boyfriend Travis Alexander

Jodi Arias is seen in photo from the Arizona Department of Corrections taken April 13, 2015. Arias has been moved to Perryville State Prison west of Phoenix to begin serving her sentence of life with no possibility of parole for shooting and stabbing her ex-boyfriend to death in 2008.

(REUTERS/Arizona Department of Corrections/Handout)

John Allen Muhammad: Sentenced to death for involvement in the Beltway sniper attacks

Sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad (L) listens with his attorney's Peter Greenspun (C) and Jonathan Shapiro during Muhammad's murder trial in courtroom 10 at the Virginia Beach Circuit Court October 22, 2003 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Muhammad has decided not to represent himself in court and to turn his defense back to his attorneys.

(Photo by Vicki Cronis-Pool/Getty Images)

Rod Blagojevich: Found guilty for extortion and attempting to sell a senate seat

Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich (L) addresses the media while wife Patti Blagojevich holds back tears at the Dirksen Federal Building December 7, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. Blagojevich was sentenced to 14 years in prison after he was found guilty of 17 public corruption charges.

(Photo by Frank Polich/Getty Images)

Scooter Libby: Found guilty of perjury, obstruction of justice and making false statements to federal investigators

I. Lewis 'Scooter' Libby , former Chief of Staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, arrives at federal court March 2, 2007 in Washington, DC. Jury deliberations continue in the case against Libby. He is accused of lying under oath during an investigation into CIA employee Valerie Plame Wilson's blown cover.

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Rae Carruth: Found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder and shooting into an occupied vehicle in the death of his pregnant girlfriend Cherica Adams

Former NFL player Rae Carruth looks at a Mecklenburg County Sheriff's deputy just after the verdicts were announced in his first degree murder trial in Charlotte, January 19, 2001. Carruth was found not guilty of first degree murder, but the jury returned guilty verdicts on three related charges in the shooting death of his former girlfriend Cherica Adams.

(Photo via Reuters)

Jeffrey Skilling and Kenneth Lay: Found guilty of conspiracy, insider trading, fraud and making false statements in the Enron scandal

Jeffrey Skilling, former president and CEO of Enron Corp., arrives at the Bob Casey Federal Courthouse in Houston, Texas Monday April 17, 2006. Skilling and Kenneth Lay, former chairman of Enron, are on trial for fraud and conspiracy.

(Photo by F. Carter Smith/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Los Angeles police officer Laurence Powell (L), one of the four defendants in the Rodney King case, waits for the start of his hearing 15 May 1992 in Los Angeles, CA. Judge Stanley Weisberg ruled in favor of a second trial for Powell on brutality charges.

(Photo credit should read POOL/AFP/Getty Images)

Jerry Sandusky: Found guilty pf child sexual abuse.

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in handcuffs after his conviction in his child sex abuse trial in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, June 22, 2012. A jury found Sandusky guilty on 45 out of 48 counts in his child sex abuse trial on Friday. He was sentenced to between 30 and 60 years in prison.

(REUTERS/Pat Little)

Ariel Castro: Pled guilty in connection with the abductions and abuse of three women.

Ariel Castro, 53, walks into the courtroom in Cleveland, Ohio July 26, 2013. Accused Cleveland kidnapper Castro agreed to plead guilty and serve life in prison without parole for the abduction and abuse of three women over about a decade. He later committed suicide.

(REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk)

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Brian Kait, a Michigan State Law professor, discovered this terrifying loophole in 2004.

He wanted to write about it, but he was so afraid a killer would use his research to commit the perfect crime, he reached out to state and federal attorneys and Congress before publishing.

He suggested that a three-sentence legislative tweak could fix everything, but no one ever wrote him back.

Morgan Warthin, a spokesperson for Yellowstone National Park, told AOL.com this has not been an issue since 1872.

"Yellowstone National Park has laws and federal law enforcement officers enforce those laws," she told AOL.com.

"The park is currently working with the National Park Service Legislative Affairs Office on this topic."

Note: AOL.com is in no way encouraging murder or any other crime.

By Kelsey Weekman, AOL.com

See photos of the park:

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A National Park Service sign welcomes visitors to Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 25, 2014: A lodgepole pine leans toward the water on the bank of the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 25, 2014: Belgian Pool is one of numerous geothermal hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Originally known as Oyster Spring, it was renamed in 1929 after a tourist from Belgium fell into the hot water and later died. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A female moose (cow) stands in a forest clearing in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. According to the National Park Service, there are fewer than 200 moose (Alces alces shirasi) in the park. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A bison grazes on grasses in the Hayden Valley section of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
KEDIRI, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - 2014/03/02: Nature's new landscape, created by the eruption of Mount Kelud, barren wastes and new ravines etched into the terrain by flowing lava. Four people were killed, dozens injured and more than 100,000 people were evacuated from villages on the Indonesian island of Java, after Mount Kelud erupted on February 13, 2014, spewing ash and lava 17 km into the sky. Volcanic dust and sand spread to almost all regions in Java forcing the closure of three international airports in the region. The most dangerous consequence of Mount Keluds eruption will come with the flow of volcanic lava dust turned to mud that will flow when it starts to rain. Kelud is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is categorized as one of the worlds deadliest in the book Super Volcano: The Ticking Time Bomb Beneath Yellowstone National Park written by Greg Breining. In the last 1,000 years it has erupted 30 times. The most severe eruption occurred in 1586 which killed between ten and fifteen thousand people. An eruption in 1901 caused lava to flow up to 23 miles from the volcano and swept away hundreds of villages and killed 5,160 people. Another eruption in 1966 killed about 2,000 people. (Photo by Arief Priyono/LightRocket via Getty Images)
EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - 2014/02/19: Some residents watched the flood of volcanic ash and lava in the Konto River, in Kandangan, Kediri. Four people were killed, dozens injured and more than 100,000 people were evacuated from villages on the Indonesian island of Java, after Mount Kelud erupted on February 13, 2014, spewing ash and lava 17 km into the sky. Volcanic dust and sand spread to almost all regions in Java forcing the closure of three international airports in the region. The most dangerous consequence of Keluds eruption will come with the flow of volcanic lava dust turned to mud that will flow when it starts to rain. Kelud is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is categorized as one of the worlds deadliest in the book Super Volcano: The Ticking Time Bomb Beneath Yellowstone National Park written by Greg Breining. In the last 1,000 years it has erupted 30 times. The most severe eruption occurred in 1586 which killed between ten and fifteen thousand people. An eruption in 1901 caused lava to flow up to 23 miles from the volcano and swept away hundreds of villages and killed 5,160 people. Another eruption in 1966 killed about 2,000 people. (Photo by Arief Priyono/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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