President-elect Trump won with lowest minority vote in decades, fueling divisions

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WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency with less support from black and Hispanic voters than any president in at least 40 years, a Reuters review of polling data shows, highlighting deep national divisions that have fueled incidents of racial and political confrontation.

Trump was elected with 8 percent of the black vote, 28 percent of the Hispanic vote and 27 percent of the Asian-American vote, according to the Reuters/Ipsos Election Day poll.

Among black voters, his showing was comparable to the 9 percent captured by George W. Bush in 2000 and Ronald Reagan in 1984. But Bush and Reagan both did far better with Hispanic voters, capturing 35 percent and 34 percent, respectively, according to exit polling data compiled by the non-partisan Roper Center for Public Opinion Research.

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Trump: Jared Kushner could help make peace between the Israelis and Palestinians.
“I would love to be the one who made peace with Israel and the Palestinians, that would be such a great achievement."
"Syria, we have to solve that problem," Trump says. Adds he has a "different view than everybody else."
"I don't think we should be a nation-builder," Trump says of the US role in the world.
"I had a great meeting with President Obama," Trump says, says he never met him before. "I really liked him a lot."
"He said very nice things after the meeting and I saidvery nice things about him," Trump says of Obama.Says he didn't know if he'd like him.
"I think he's looking to do absolutely the right thing for the country in terms of transition," Trump says of Obama.
'He did tell me what he thought were the biggest problems, in particular one problem," Trump says. Won't say what that was.
"I feel comfortable," Trump says of adapting to the job.
Trump on GOP leaders @McConnellPress & @SpeakerRyan: "Right now they’re in love with me. Four weeks ago, they weren’t in love with me"
Asked point-blank about Nazi conference in DC over wknd: @realDonaldTrump tells @nytimes "of course" "I disavow and condemn them"
Trump is asked about concerns from minority groups about Breitbart News’s coverage under Steve Bannon. His reply: https://t.co/FBqCGwQpBr
"Paul Ryan, right now, loves me. Mitch McConnell loves me," Trump says. Then says, "I've liked Chuck Schumer for a long time."
Trump: “If you see something or you get something where you feel that I’m wrong, I'd love to hear it. You can call me. Arthur can call me."
"A lot of people are coming to his defense right now," Trump says of Bannon. Reince voices support too at conference table.
On Bannon:"If I thought he was a racist or alt-right or any of the things, the terms we could use, I wouldn't even think about hiring him."
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"My company's so unimportant to me relative to what I'm doing." Trump.
What about selling your company? “That’s a really hard thing to do, because I have real estate."
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And Trump's performance among Asian-Americans was the worst of any winning presidential candidate since tracking of that demographic began in 1992.

The racial polarization behind Trump's victory has helped set the stage for tensions that have surfaced repeatedly since the election, in white supremacist victory celebrations, in anti-Trump protests and civil rights rallies, and in hundreds of racist, xenophobic and anti-Semitic hate crimes documented by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), which tracks extremist movements. The SPLC reports there were 701 incidents of "hateful harassment and intimidation" between the day following the Nov. 8 election and Nov. 16, with a spike in such incidents in the immediate wake of the vote.

Signs point to an ongoing atmosphere of confrontation.

The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a white separatist group that vilifies African-Americans, Jews and other minorities, plans an unusual Dec. 3 rally in North Carolina to celebrate Trump's victory. Left-wing and anarchist groups have called for organized protests to disrupt the president-elect's Jan. 20 inauguration. And a "Women's March on Washington," scheduled for the following day, is expected to draw hundreds of thousands to protest Trump's presidency.

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American politics became increasingly racialized through President Barack Obama's two terms, "but there was an attempt across the board, across the parties, to keep those tensions under the surface," says Jamila Michener, an assistant professor of government at Cornell University.

Trump's anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim rhetoric "brought those divisions to the fore; it activated people on the right, who felt empowered, and it activated people on the left, who saw it as a threat," she added.

That dynamic was evident last week.

When Vice President-elect Mike Pence attended the Broadway musical "Hamilton" in New York on Friday, the multi-ethnic cast closed with a statement expressing fears of a Trump presidency. A far different view was on display the next day as a crowd of about 275 people cheered Trump's election at a Washington conference of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist group with a strong anti-Semitic beliefs.

"We willed Donald Trump into office; we made this dream our reality," NPI President Richard Spencer said. After outlining a vision of America as "a white country designed for ourselves and our posterity," he closed with, "Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!"

DIVISION BREEDS CONFRONTATION

Though Trump's election victory was driven by white voters, his performance even among that group was not as strong as some of his predecessors. Reagan and George H.W. Bush both won the presidency with higher shares of the white vote than the 55 percent that Trump achieved.

The historical voting patterns reflect decades of polarization in American politics, but the division surrounding Trump appears more profound, says Cas Mudde, an associate professor specializing in political extremism at the University of Georgia. These days, he adds, "people say they don't want their children even to date someone from the other party."

Indeed, voters' opinions of those on the opposite side of the partisan divide have reached historic lows. Surveys by the Pew Research Center showed this year that majorities of both parties held "very unfavorable" views of the other party - a first since the center first measured such sentiment in 1992.

RELATED: Donald Trump's life leading up to the election

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Donald Trump's life leading up to the election
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Donald Trump's life leading up to the election

Bound for the rigors of business school in the future, Donald Trump received discipline at an early age by attending a military academy. There, he reportedly excelled in extracurricular activities such as being the Honor Cadet.

Donald Trump in the New York Military Academy's 1964 yearbook

Source: Classmates

Trump also enjoys tennis — he even played a round, wearing his traditional suit, against the legendary Serena Williams.

Developer Donald Trump talks with his former wife Ivana Trump during the men's final at the U.S. Open September 7, 1997. REUTERS/File Photo 

Being the entertaining host, Trump also spared no expense in providing a spectacular show for friends and family.

 Developer and multi-millionaire Donald Trump (R) watches as ex-wife Marla Maples gets a kiss from Earl Sinclair of TV's 'Dinosaurs' during lunch at the Trump Plaza Hotel November 2, 1992. REUTERS/Henry Ray Abrams

As a self-proclaimed family man, Trump attended many public events and television shows with his family, even before his current campaign.

 Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump attend U.S. Open Tennis Tournament on August 30, 1991 at Flushing Meadows Park in New York City. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

Source: Oprah

Trump first started showing signs of interest for a possible bid for the US presidency with the formation of a presidential exploratory committee ahead of the 2000 election.

Billionaire real estate developer Donald Trump (R) talks with host Larry King after taping a segment of King's CNN talk show, in New York October 7. Reuters

Source: Reuters

In 2005, Donald Trump married fashion designer and model Melania Trump.

Real estate magnate Donald Trump (L) and Melania Trump leave Hollinger International's annual meeting at the Metropolitan Club in New York on May 22, 2003.

REUTERS/Peter Morgan PM/ME

Source: PolitiFact

As no stranger to the political process, Donald Trump was even acquainted with members of the judicial branch.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (L), serving as the grand marshal for the Daytona 500, speaks to Donald Trump  on the starting grid at the Daytona International Speedway February 14. JLS/ELD

Trump famously launched his presidential campaign in June 2015 by coming down an escalator in Trump Tower. Since then, he has weathered waves of controversy to become the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

 (Photo by Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)

Trump made his final appeal to voters in swing-states as the contentious campaign drew to a close.

 Donald Trump speaks at a rally at SNHU Arena in Manchester, NH, on Nov. 7, 2016, the night before election day. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

President-elect Trump at his election night party at the Hilton Hotel in New York City.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump acknowledges the crowd during his election night event. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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And the lion's share of those people believe the opposing party's policies "are so misguided that they threaten the nation's well-being," the center found.

That level of division has spurred activists on both sides of the political divide to take their activism in a more confrontational direction.

In the wake of Trump's victory, protesters on the left took to the streets by the thousands in cities across the country, in some cases causing property damage.

Much of the agitation was motivated by a belief that Trump's administration will foster racism and push the courts and other political institutions to disenfranchise minority voters, says James Anderson, editor of ItsGoingDown.Org, an anarchist website that has promoted mass demonstrations against Trump's presidency, including a call to disrupt his inauguration.

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Many on the left have come to distrust government institutions, embracing a breed of activism aimed at directly confronting what they see as condemnable political forces, Anderson says. "The answer now is to organize, build power and autonomy and fight back."

On the opposite end of the political spectrum, Trump's election is bringing new hope for right-wing activists who felt abandoned by the major parties.

John Roberts, a top officer in the Ku Klux Klan affiliate planning the December rally to celebrate Trump's election, says the group is committed to non-violent demonstrations, but he sees Trump's election as likely to bring a new era of political conflict. And much of the strife, he says, will be centered around racial divisions.

"Once Trump officially takes office, there is going to be a boiling over at some point in time," Roberts says. "Who knows when that's going to be, but it's not going to be pretty."

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