12 powerful images from the Standing Rock protests

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Powerful images from the Standing Rock protests
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Powerful images from the Standing Rock protests
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: Erin Wise (C) of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, leads a protest march from the Army Corps of Engineers to the White House to demonstration against the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline November 15, 2016 in Washington, DC. Organizers held a national day of action to call on President Barack Obama and the Army Corps of Engineers to permanently reject the pipeline before President-elect Donald Trump takes office. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 13: Activists gather in front of the White House during a rally against the Dakota Access Pipeline September 13, 2016 in Washington, DC. Activists held a rally to call on President Barack Obama to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Demonstrators chant as they gather in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on September 13, 2016, to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The US government on September 9, 2016 sought to stop work on a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota that has angered Native Americans, blocking any work on federal land and asking the company to 'voluntarily pause' work nearby. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: Hundreds of demonstrators block the entrance to the Army Corps of Engineers headquarters as they protest against the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline November 15, 2016 in Washington, DC. Organizers held a national day of action to call on President Barack Obama and the Army Corps of Engineers to permanently reject the pipeline before President-elect Donald Trump takes office. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Juan Flores (L) a traditional Aztec dancer looks on during a rally on September 13, 2016 in San Diego, California, in support for the protestors at Standing Rock, North Dakota who are fighting construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The US government last week sought to stop construction on a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota that has angered Native Americans, blocking any work on federal land and asking the company to 'voluntarily pause' work nearby. / AFP / Sandy Huffaker (Photo credit should read SANDY HUFFAKER/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A demonstrator raises his first next to a placard as they gather in front of the White House in Washington, DC, September 13, 2016, to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The US government on September 9, 2016 sought to stop work on a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota that has angered Native Americans, blocking any work on federal land and asking the company to 'voluntarily pause' work nearby. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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What started out as as a line of peaceful protests in defense of Standing Rock Sioux tribe's water supply has turned into the focal point of political conversation in recent months.

The Dakota Access Pipeline, a proposed $3.8 billion oil transmission line across North Dakota, South Dakota, Illinois and Iowa, was brought forth by Energy Transfer Partners. The company is reportedly preparing to tunnel under Lake Oahe, which the tribe fears will pollute local water supplies and foul its sacred tribal sites..

In late October, Senator Bernie Sanders rallied against the Dakota Access Pipeline and took to Twitter to defend the cause.

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