Obama to Trump: No evidence U.S. election rigged; 'Stop whining'


WASHINGTON, Oct 18 (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday scolded Donald Trump over his repeated claims that the upcoming Nov. 8 election was "rigged" against him, telling the Republican presidential candidate to "stop whining."

At a joint news conference in the White House Rose Garden following meetings with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Obama was asked about Trump's claims that U.S. cities are rife with voter fraud and that there were efforts to "rig the election at the polling place."

"I'd invite Mr. Trump to stop whining and go try to make his case to get votes," Obama advised.

For many months, Trump has raised the possibility of illegal activities that could tarnish the November election result, and he has urged his supporters to show up at polling locations on Election Day.

In recent days, Trump's rhetoric at campaign appearances and on social media about a rigged election has intensified as his standing in public opinion polls has fallen.

Referring to Trump's contention, Obama said: "It's unprecedented. It happens to be based on no facts." (Reporting By Ayesha Rascoe and Richard Cowan; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

See photos of Obama on Clinton's campaign trial:

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Obama campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina
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Obama campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
People listen as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
People react as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A protester shouts slogans as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A protester is escorted out as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Protesters shout slogans as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama attends a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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