A week later, Hurricane Matthew death toll continues to rise

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North Carolina continues cleanup after Hurricane Matthew
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North Carolina continues cleanup after Hurricane Matthew
A resident paddles his kayak out of his neighborhood after checking the condition of his house as river levels rise into town in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A man carries his son through flood waters surrounding their home after inspecting it amidst rising river levels in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: A man clears debris from the street on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: (L-R) Anyah Carpenter, Cassandra Rush and Rosa Rush walk through floodwaters in their neighborhood on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: Billy Wearnes paddles through floodwaters on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: Jibrail Freeman inspects some of his flood damaged artwork in his living room on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: A man pumps floodwaters from the inside of a business on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: Carrey Mustoe talks on his phone in a flooded neighborhood on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: Billy Wearnes (L) and his brother Harvey Wearnes take supplies to Billy's home on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Sandbags protect the entrances to homes whose occupants evacuated as the rising Tar River threatens nearby communities in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A cotton field is flooded as waters from the swollen Tar River inundate nearby farmland in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Old Sparta, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Spray-painted lines show the date, time and feet above standard river level as rising flood waters from the swollen Tar River inundate a neighborhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Greenville, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tarboro residents are reflected in flood waters as they survey streets swamped by the swollen Tar River in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Tarboro, North Carolina on October 13, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A home and vehicle share a temporary island as flood waters from the swollen Tar River inundate communities along its course in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Old Sparta, North Carolina, U.S. October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A building and street signs are reflected in flood waters as the Tar River rises to dangerous levels in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, in Tarboro, North Carolina on October 13, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: A campaign sign is partially submerged in floodwaters from the Lumber River on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 15: Propane tanks are strewn across a road following heavy flooding on October 15, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. The flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew has been responsible for 26 deaths in the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory confirmed on Saturday that the death toll in the wake of Hurricane Matthew had risen to 26 in his state.

The announcement came after two more bodies — a 53-year-old man and a 47-year-old woman — were pulled from their cars, which had been trapped underwater.

Forty-six people — 26 in North Carolina, 12 in Florida, four in South Carolina, three in Georgia and one in Virginia — died across the country during the hurricane and its aftermath. Before the storm made landfall in the United States, it claimed the lives of roughly 1,000 people in Haiti.

North Carolina towns like Princeville – the oldest municipality incorporated by African Americans in the country – remain effectively underwater, as do communities in Lumberton and Fair Bluff.

Related: See aerial footage from damage in South Carolina:

While the hurricane is long-passed, the death toll and destruction in communities across the southern United States continues to mount. In North Carolina, major rivers like the Lumber, Neuse, and Tar are expected to remain at flood levels until at least Wednesday. Six hundred sixty separate roads remained closed in the state, and nearly 13,000 homes and businesses are still without power.

North Carolina has seen 2,333 water rescues since the hurricane struck and 300 Federal Emergency Management Agency officials are on the ground there offering assistance to those displaced by the flooding.

The governor has said that he plans to release a comprehensive plan for his state's rebuilding and recovery early next week.

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