Donald Trump continues to slide in the polls as controversies mount

With a little more than three weeks until Election Day, Hillary Clinton holds a strong and steady lead in the polls as Donald Trump's numbers continue to fall across the country.

A week after the second presidential debate and the former secretary of state has a 5.5 percent lead nationally -- 47.7 percent to Trump's 42.2 percent -- according to the latest Real Clear Politics average.

Key Republicans speak out against Trump

26 PHOTOS
Republicans coming out against Donald Trump
See Gallery
Republicans coming out against Donald Trump

Arizona Senator John McCain: "I will not vote for Donald Trump."

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush: "No apology can excuse away Donald Trump's reprehensible comments degrading women."

(Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)

Texas Senator Ted Cruz: Trump's comments are "disturbing and inappropriate, there is simply no excuse for them."

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham: "I have never been comfortable with Donald Trump as our Republican nominee."

(Photo by Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit)

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice: "Donald Trump should not be President."

(Photo by Vladimir Shtanko/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

South Dakota Senator John Thune: "Donald Trump should withdraw and Mike Pence should be our nominee effective immediately."

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski: "I cannot and will not support Donald Trump for president."

(Photo by Matthew Busch/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse: Donald trump "is obviously not going to win [and should] step aside."

(Photo credit SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Idaho Senator Mike Crapo: Donald Trump should step aside due to "disrespectful, profane and demeaning" behavior.

(Photo by Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Utah Senator Mike Lee: Donald Trump is a "distraction.

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Maine Senator Susan Collins: Donald Trump is "unsuitable for the presidency ... I [can] not support his candidacy."

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Texas Senator John Cornyn: "I am disgusted by Mr Trump's words about women."

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman: "The time has come for Governor Pence to lead the ticket."

(Photo by Larry French/Getty Images)

Utah Representative Mia Love: Stated she "cannot vote for" Donald Trump. 

(Photo credit SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Colorado Representative Mike Coffman: Donald Trump should withdraw "for the good of the country."

(Photo By Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Missouri Representative Ann Wagner: "I withdraw my endorsement and call for Governor Pence to take the lead" in the race.

(Photo via REUTERS/Gary Cameron)

Virginia Representative Barbara Comstock: Trump's remarks were "disgusting, vile, and disqualifying."

(Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Alaska Senator Dan Sullivan: "I will support Governor Mike Pence for President."

Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Colorado Senator Cory Gardner: Donald Trump's flaws are "beyond mere moral shortcomings ... I cannot and will not support someone who brags about degrading and assaulting women."

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

New Jersey Representative Scott Garrett: Has stated he is "appalled" by Trump's actions.

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Former New York Governor George Pataki: "Enough! [Trump] needs to step down."

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Michigan Representative Fred Upton: Donald Trump needs to "step down."

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam: Trump should "step aside and let Gov. Mike Pence assume the role as the party's nominee."

(Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images)

Utah Governor Gary Herbert: "I will not vote for Trump."

(Photo by James MacDonald/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

California Representative Steve Knight: Trump's comments were "inexcusable."

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Trump has experienced a considerable drop in the polls throughout the month of October; a month that has seen the billionaire businessman face one controversy after another. As October began, The New York Times leaked Trump's 1995 tax records that suggest he avoided paying federal taxes for years. A week later a video was published in which Trump bragged about groping women. In the ensuing days, multiple women came forward to accuse the real-estate mogul of inappropriately touching them throughout the years.

According to FiveThirtyEight's Election Forecast, Trump entered October with a 32.7 percent chance of winning the 2016 election. But after just two weeks, Trump now stands at a dismal 13.4 percent chance of victory according to polls and only 11.2 percent chance if the election were held today, showing that perhaps even The Donald isn't immune to such a mounting list of controversies.

SEE THE OTHER KEY MOMENTS IN THE ELECTION

While prediction markets have seen Clinton's chances to become the next president increase over the past few weeks, the number of voters who officially support her has hovered around 47 to 48 percent throughout October. Given Trump's falling numbers, some have wondered why Clinton has been unable to pull away in any significant way.

RELATED: RCP general election poll average - Clinton vs. Trump

The former secretary of state's steady popularity is likely due in part to the slew of negative news emerging from multiple email drops released by WikiLeaks. The emails were hacked as part of a major breach of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's email account.

RELATED: See Clinton hit the trail after her bout of pneumonia:

16 PHOTOS
Hillary Clinton campaigning after pneumonia
See Gallery
Hillary Clinton campaigning after pneumonia
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a thumbs up as she boards her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, United States September 15, 2016, to resume her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton boards her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, United States September 15, 2016, to resume her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States, September 15, 2016, after she resumed her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States, September 15, 2016, after she resumed her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves after speaking at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 39th Annual Gala Dinner in Washington, DC, U.S. September 15, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 39th Annual Gala Dinner in Washington, DC, U.S. September 15, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Black Women's Agenda Annual Symposium in Washington, U.S., September 16, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves as she boards her campaign plane in Washington, U.S., September 16, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton reacts as she receives the CBC Trailblazer Award during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Phoenix Awards Dinner at the Washington convention center in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Phoenix Awards Dinner in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the media before boarding her campaign plane at the Westchester County airport in White Plains, New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talks to reporters about the explosion in Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York, as she arrives at the Westchester County airport in White Plains, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a bilateral meeting with Egypt's President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi (R) at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a bilateral meeting with Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko (R) at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Trump has stated that the WikiLeaks email drops have received "very little pick-up by the dishonest media," claiming it shows a "rigged system!"

Clinton and Trump will square off one last time in Las Vegas on Wednesday for the final presidential debate moderated by FOX News anchor Chris Wallace.

RELATED: RCP four-way swing state polling

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.