Is Russia getting ready for war?

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Russia could be prepping for a new "global war" and has reportedly ordered all the relatives of officials abroad home to Russia, according to a new report.

"This is all part of the package of measures to prepare elites to some 'big war,'" Stanislav Belkovsky, a Russia analyst, is quoted by the Daily Star as saying.

"If you want a confrontation, you'll get one. But it won't be a confrontation that doesn't harm the interests of the United States. You want a confrontation, you'll get one everywhere," said retired Russian Lt. Gen. Evgeny Buzhinsky.

"As [Russian President Vladimir] Putin sees it, it is full-scale confrontation on all fronts," Buzhinsky said.

See more about the Russian leader:

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Vladimir Putin
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Vladimir Putin
Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a glass of champagne after a state awards ceremony at the Kremlin in Moscow, on March 10, 2016. AFP PHOTO / POOL / PAVEL GOLOVKIN / AFP / POOL / PAVEL GOLOVKIN (Photo credit should read PAVEL GOLOVKIN/AFP/Getty Images)
MOSCOW, RUSSIA. MARCH 1, 2016. Russia's president Vladimir Putin at the 7th congress of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation (CCI). Mikhail Metzel/TASS (Photo by Mikhail Metzel\TASS via Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu leave Moscow's Red Square on May 9, 2015 after the Victory Day military parade. Russian President Vladimir Putin presides over a huge Victory Day parade celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Soviet win over Nazi Germany, amid a Western boycott of the festivities over the Ukraine crisis. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) speaks with the leader of Georgia's breakaway province of South Ossetia Leonid Tibilov during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow on June 1, 2015. AFP PHOTO / POOL / IVAN SEKRETAREV (Photo credit should read IVAN SEKRETAREV/AFP/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - FEBRUARY 17: Russian President Vladimir Putin (C) looks on as Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban kisses the hand of a member of the Russian delegation during a signing ceremony of several agreements between the two countries on February 17, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. Putin is in Budapest on a one-day visit, his first visit to an EU-member country since he attended ceremonies marking the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasions in France in June, 2014. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) meets with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi at the Kremlin in Moscow on May 21, 2015. AFP PHOTO / POOL / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
SOCHI, RUSSIA - MARCH 16: Russia President Vladimir Putin waves during the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games Closing Ceremony at Fisht Olympic Stadium on March 16, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures as he speaks during a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo, Japan, December 16, 2016. REUTERS/Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool
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This comes as former Soviet premier Mikhail Gorbachev has warned that the world is at a "dangerous point" due to rising tensions between Russia and the United States, citing a "collapse of mutual trust."

"We need to renew dialogue. Stopping it was the biggest mistake. Now we must return to the main priorities, such as nuclear disarmament, fighting terrorism and prevention of global environmental disasters," Gorbachev warned earlier this week.

Russian and American leaders have differed over policy in Syria and Ukraine, among other issues. But the rift extends to other Western powers; Putin recently canceled an upcoming trip to Paris and meeting with French President Francois Hollande. Further complicating matters, the Obama administration has accused Moscow of backing hacks meant to disrupt the U.S. election.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Putin steadfastly denied those allegations Wednesday.

"There's nothing there benefiting Russia," Putin told the Russia Calling conference Wednesday. "The hysteria is simply to distract the American people from the contents of what the hackers have posted."

Also see Putin meet with the embattled Syrian president:

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Syrian president Bashar Assad meets with Putin
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Syrian president Bashar Assad meets with Putin
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