Donald Trump's campaign plans to go 'buck wild' and paint Bill Clinton 'as Bill Cosby'

The Donald Trump campaign signaled Wednesday its strategy for combating allegations of sexual misconduct against the Republican presidential nominee: fight fire with fire.

More specifically, the campaign reportedly said it would seek to paint former President Bill Clinton "as Bill Cosby," the same day multiple women accused Trump of making unwanted sexual advances toward them.

MORE FROM BUSINESS INSIDER: Multiple women say Donald Trump made inappropriate sexual advances on them

Cosby has been charged for sexual assault and is set to go on trial next year.

"She's led a program of victim intimidation," Trump campaign CEO Steve Bannon told Trump staffers of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, two advisers who were present told Bloomberg. "This has nothing to do with consensual sexual affairs and infidelities. This is Bill."

Bannon elaborated: "We're going to turn him into Bill Cosby. He's a violent sexual predator who physically abuses women who he assaults. And she takes the lead on the intimidation of the victims."

RELATED: See the women who have accused Clinton

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Women who have accused Bill Clinton of abuse attend debate
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Women who have accused Bill Clinton of abuse attend debate
Juanita Broaddrick speaks in the spin room after the the town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Kathleen Willey and Juanita Broaddrick (L-R) sit at the presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton (L-R) are seated at the second U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Juanita Broaddrick arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathleen Willey arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathy Shelton speaks in the spin room after the the town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Kathy Shelton arrives for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Bill Clinton accuser Juanita Broaddrick (L) chats with rape victim Kathy Shelton as they take their seats for the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton (L-R) are seated at the start of the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: (L-R) Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick, Kathy Shelton, a guest, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's daughters-in-law Lara Trump and Vanessa Trump and daughter Tiffany Trump sit before the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: (L-R) Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton sit before the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Already, Trump has held a press conference with three of the former president's accusers of sexual misconduct, which happened Sunday right before the second presidential debate. That news conference came two days after a 2005 tape leaked in which Trump boasted that he could "grab" women "by the p---y" because "when you're a star they let you do it."

The three women who spoke to reporters — Juanita Broaddrick, Paula Jones, and Kathleen Willey — all sat near the front of the debate afterward.

With less than 30 days to go until Election Day, a Trump adviser told Bloomberg that "we're gonna go buck wild."

The goal, according to Bloomberg, is for the Trump campaign to suppress the vote of millennial women, who they believe will be unable to vote for the former secretary of state after their case is made against her husband.

The campaign promised that it will soon bring forward additional, new accusers.

"Women are coming to us who have been groped or sexually abused by Bill Clinton," a senior adviser said.

Deputy campaign manager David Bossie, known for running Citizens United, told Bloomberg that Trump's campaign now has the "opportunity to introduce new material into the campaign to educate voters on how they treat women."

On Thursday, one of Trump's biggest backers, Fox News personality Sean Hannity, will host an hour-long special on the network with the three women who appeared alongside Trump before Sunday's presidential debate.

After the Bloomberg story broke, Angel Urena, the former president's press secretary responded on Twitter:

"His show should be titled A Race To The Bottom," Urena added.

NOW WATCH: Watch the brutal Hillary Clinton ad that pits Trump against himself

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