This fish will give you nightmares

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Meet the Atlantic Wolffish

Just like the name implies, they are key predators of the sea. These fish have evolved to live in freezing water as low as zero degrees celsius. They can also live up to 20 years!

The Wolffish have fang-like teeth that are ideal for crushing sea shells and eating oysters whole. These creatures live deep in the depths of the Atlantic Ocean.

Even though they may look threatening, they play an important role in the ocean's ecosystem. They help control sea urchins from overpopulating.

So, no need to be afraid of the big, bad wolf.

Check out the captivating Lion fish:

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Lionfish
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Lionfish
Cubans look at a lionfish in a fish tank in Havana, on June 2, 2016. Cuba includes in its menu lionfish to combat this invasive and predatory species that threatens the balance of the Caribbean Sea. / AFP / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 19: A lionfish swims in a tank at Artisanal Foods on February 19, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Cubans look at a lionfish in a fish tank in Havana, on June 2, 2016. Cuba includes in its menu lionfish to combat this invasive and predatory species that threatens the balance of the Caribbean Sea. / AFP / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 19: A lionfish swims in a tank at Artisanal Foods on February 19, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
A dead lionfish floats in the water, as its greenish blood is seen in the background, after it was speared by Mexican dive master Martin Vera off the reefs of Cozumel February 11, 2011. Native to Indo-Pacific waters, lionfish have invaded the Caribbean because of the aquarium trade and are gobbling up native species but have no predators in the region, so their population is exploding. Picture taken February 11, 2011. To go with Reuters Life! LIONFISH-CARRIBBEAN/INVASION REUTERS/Christa Cameron. (MEXICO - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
A lionfish swims in the "Chichiriviche de la Costa" beach in the state of Vargas outside Caracas July 25, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. Picture taken July 25, 2010. REUTERS/Rommel Cubas/Handout (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
Oscar Lasso-Alcala, a researcher at the La Salle Foundation of Natural Sciences, holds a stuffed lion fish in Caracas September 7, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
A stuffed lionfish is seen at the La Salle Foundation of Natural Sciences in Caracas September 7, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
Licensed divers catch a red lionfish on a Cayman Islands reef in this undated handout photo. More than 300 scuba divers have been certified to catch red lionfish in a race to prevent the invasive and voracious species from consuming all the young and small fish on theCayman Islands' famous corals reefs. REUTERS/Kimberly Parker/DiveTech/Handout (CAYMAN ISLANDS - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
A lionfish is seen on the reefs off Roatan, Honduras in this picture taken May 5, 2010. Native to Indo-Pacific waters, lionfish have invaded the Caribbean because of the aquarium trade and are gobbling up native species but have no predators in the region, so their population is exploding. Picture taken May 5, 2010. To go with Reuters Life! LIONFISH-CARIBBEAN/INVASION REUTERS/Christa Cameron (HONDURAS - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
A haul of lionfish freshly speared by Mexican dive master Martin Vera on the reefs off Cozumel, Mexico, in this photo taken February 13, 2011. Native to Indo-Pacific waters, lionfish have invaded the Caribbean because of the aquarium trade and are gobbling up native species but have no predators in the region, so their population is exploding. Picture taken February 13, 2011. To go with Reuters Life! LIONFISH-CARRIBBEAN/INVASION REUTERS/Christa Cameron (MEXICO - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
A dead lionfish floats in the water, as its greenish blood is seen in the background, after it was speared by Mexican dive master Martin Vera off the reefs of Cozumel February 11, 2011. Native to Indo-Pacific waters, lionfish have invaded the Caribbean because of the aquarium trade and are gobbling up native species but have no predators in the region, so their population is exploding. Picture taken February 11, 2011. To go with Reuters Life! LIONFISH-CARRIBBEAN/INVASION REUTERS/Christa Cameron. (MEXICO - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
A lionfish swims in a fish tank at a pet shop in Caracas September 7, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A stuffed lionfish is seen at the La Salle Foundation of Natural Sciences in Caracas September 7, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
Oscar Lasso-Alcala, a researcher at the La Salle Foundation of Natural Sciences, holds a stuffed lion fish in Caracas September 7, 2010. Six lionfish, which are native to the Indian Ocean, were accidentally released into the Caribbean in 1992, when an aquarium in southern Florida was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. Lionfish, which are believed to threaten native marine wildlife in Venezuela and the livelihoods of coastal towns dependent on fishing and tourism, have since been detected in at least 30 locations across the country since July 2010, triggering alarm among experts. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins (VENEZUELA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
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