Second presidential debate promises ugliness after Trump tapes

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Parents with small children may want to consider putting them to bed before Sunday's presidential debate, which seems certain to devolve into a TV-MA grudge of reciprocal sexual assault allegations.

The release of hot mic audio from a Trump appearance on Access Hollywood in 2005 could not have come at worse time for his debate preparation. Virtually the entire Republican Party spent Saturday racing to condemn Trump, who had to fight off questions about dropping out of the race while holed up in Trump Tower.

Already volcanic and unpredictable, and stinging from a flubbed first debate performance, Trump now walks onto the stage at Washington University with an open wound and an apparent desire to lash out at Hillary Clinton.

Related: These GOP Leaders Say Trump Should Not Be President

Beyond personal issues, Trump will have fresh ammunition from the purported transcripts of paid speeches Clinton gave that were contained in the hacked emails released Friday by Wikileaks. For instance, Trump is almost sure bring up Clinton's call for "open trade and open borders" in a speech to a Brazillian bank.

See more from the first presidential debate:

35 PHOTOS
Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off in first presidential debate
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Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off in first presidential debate
U.S. Secret Service agents walk onto the debate floor before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Workers on the stage prepare for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A TV cameraman works during a rehearsal for the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York September 25, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The media center for the first U.S. presidential debate is seen at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 24, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Ivanka Trump arrives for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, waves to an attendee in the audience ahead of the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump meet Monday night for a presidential debate that will give them their broadest exposure to voters and promises to be a pivotal moment in a long and increasingly close race. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HEMPSTEAD, NY - SEPTEMBER 26: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's wife, Melania Trump greets with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's husband and former U.S. President Bill Clinton during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York. The first of four debates for the 2016 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by NBC's Lester Holt. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence looks on before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves after the first presidential debate against Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (not shown) at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican nominee Donald Trump leave the stage after the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (R) gestures next to Republican nominee Donald Trump during the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Moderator Lester Holt presides over the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Melania Trump (L-R), the wife of Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump, sits with his daughter Ivanka Trump, Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence and Pence's wife Karen Pence during Trump's first debate against Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (R) and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani chat as they take their seats ahead of the start of the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban arrives at the U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Las Vegas casino magnate Sheldon Adelson sits with his wife Miriam as they await the start of the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump Democratic and U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Promoter Don King Don King (C) speaks with Las Vegas casino owner Sheldon Adelson prior to the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Former U.S. President Bill Clinton (C) talks with his daughter Chelsea Clinton prior to the first presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. At right is Marc Mezvinsky, the husband of Chelsea Clinton. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump reacts during the first presidential debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton smiles during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump reacts during the first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton looks on during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Debate moderator Lester Holt of NBC News replaces his jacket after a technician fixed his earpiece before the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump pauses during the first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton discuss a point during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, speaks during the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump meet Monday night for a presidential debate that will give them their broadest exposure to voters and promises to be a pivotal moment in a long and increasingly close race. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton pauses during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump sips water during his first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (2nd from L) chats with members of his family after the conclusion of his first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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Adding to the drama, Clinton and Trump will be surrounded by American voters who will pepper the candidates with questions, thanks to the town hall format. There are no podiums to separate the candidates, who will sit on stools just feet apart from each other, and they are encouraged to roam the circular stage.

Trump has been threatening for weeks to dredge up accusations that Bill Clinton sexually harassed women, and that Hillary Clinton enabled her husband's actions. But after restraining himself in the first debate, he now seems to be chomping at the bit.

"I've said some foolish things but there's a big difference between the words and actions of other people," Trump said in his 90-second video released late Friday night to apologize for his comments on the new audio tape. "Bill Clinton has actually abused women and Hillary has bullied, attacked, shamed, and intimidated his victims."

"We will discuss this more in the coming days. See you at the debate on Sunday," Trump concluded.

Related: Deconstructing Donald Trump's Apology Video

On Saturday, he retweeted Juanita Broderick's claim that Bill Clinton raped her in 1978 — which Clinton has strongly denied.

Meanwhile, at a campaign event the same day, a heckler called Bill Clinton a "rapist," possibly motivated by a $5,000 reward offered by Trump ally Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist, to "anyone who can be vocally heard saying 'Bill Clinton is a rapist' while wearing the shirt [that Jones sells] or displaying similar imagery."

Trump, who has displayed no shame in bragging about his own sexual conquests, and blamed gender integration for the rise of military sexual assault, is a poor messenger on this topic.

But while Hillary Clinton has repeatedly accused Trump of making misogynistic remarks, she's steered clear of the handful of sexual assault allegations that do exist against Trump, since raising them would inevitably lead to an uncomfortable conversation her husband.

The seal has now been breached.

Democrats said Trump's comments on the tape go far beyond the what he called "locker room banter. "It's not lewd. It's sexual assault," Vice President Biden, who authored the Violence Against Women Act in the Senate, tweeted Saturday.

Clinton advisors are tight lipped about how she might respond if and when Trump invokes her husband. But she'll almost certainly try to avoid a lengthy discussion about the details of the cases and instead try to adopt some form of Michelle Obama's mantra, "when they go low, we go high."

See Donald Trump and Bill Clinton during friendlier days:

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Bill Clinton and Donald Trump in 2000
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Bill Clinton and Donald Trump in 2000
Donald Trump (L) greets then U.S. President Bill Clinton at a fundraiser in New York, U.S., in this June 16, 2000 handout photograph. Courtesy William J. Clinton Presidential Library/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Donald Trump (R) shows a book to then U.S. President Bill Clinton at a fundraiser in New York, U.S. in this June 16, 2000 handout photo. Courtesy William J. Clinton Presidential Library/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Donald Trump (2ndL) and his wife Melania (R) pose with then U.S. President Bill Clinton and model Kylie Bax at the U.S. Open in Flushing, New York, U.S., in this September 8, 2000 handout photo. Courtesy William J. Clinton Presidential Library/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Donald Trump (L) greets then U.S. President Bill Clinton at the U.S. Open in Flushing, New York, U.S., in this September 8, 2000 handout photo. Courtesy William J. Clinton Presidential Library/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Donald Trump (L) laughs with then U.S. President Bill Clinton at the U.S. Open in Flushing, New York, U.S in this September 8, 2000 handout photo. Courtesy William J. Clinton Presidential Library/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
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Clinton huddled with staff for her third straight day of debate prep Saturday at a hotel near her home in Chappaqua, New York, with former aide Philippe Reines reprising his role as Trump in mock debates.

Clinton's campaign has devoted hundreds of manhours to debate prep and anticipated Trump might bring up "the 90s stuff," as Democrats euphemistically refer to it, ahead of the first debate. That seemed especially likely after Gennifer Flowers accepted Trump's invitation to attend the event as his guest (his campaign later said the invitation was not sincere and she did not appear).

Still, Clinton aides believe bringing the Bill Clinton sex scandals will backfire on Trump.

As the GOP nominee weathered an excruciating 24 hours that featured mass defections of from his party, Clinton's campaign adopted a strategic silence, in order to give Clinton herself a chance to address Trump on the biggest stage possible.

"There's not a lot of need to put spin on the ball here," a Clinton campaign official said on a conference call with allies Saturday morning, a source on a call told NBC News, explaining their quiet. "You're going to hear more about this, I'm certain, in the debate."

Most Republicans have repeatedly waved Trump off the Bill Clinton scandals, with even diehard Clinton opponents arguing it's "a recipe for blowback," as Republican strategist Rick Wilson put it.

"These voters were completely turned off and disgusted by it," Tim Miller said of focus group testing conducted for the anti-Clinton super PAC he helped run. "We found time and again these attacks turned Hillary into a victim and that it engendered sympathy for her."

But Trump is surrounded by aides who have spent years prosecuting the Clintons and seem to have convinced themselves that the sex scandals will be her Achilles heel.

Fox News host Sean Hannity, one of Trump's most vocal defenders and informal adviser to his campaign, said Friday night that the Access Hollywood tape's release could have a silver lining.

"Does it now open a door and a narrative that probably wasn't going to come prior to these tapes being released," Hannity said, referring to the Bill Clinton sex scandals. "Hillary's enabling and smearing and slandering of these women. And does it help Trump or hurt Trump?"

Meanwhile, there's a startling backlog of other controversies which have emerged just since the last debate. There's the tax returns leaked to the New York Times, the U.S. government officially blaming Russia for hacks intended to interfere in the election (Trump downplayed the Russian cyber threat in the last debate), his statement that the Central Park 5 are guilty despite their exoneration, along with his continued attacks on former Miss Universe Alicia Machado, among others.

After his dreadful first debate, and the disastrous two weeks that followed, expectations could hardly be lower. Trump needs to stop the bleeding immediately to have any hope of recovery.

Related: Also see more from the VP debate:

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Vice presidential debate
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Vice presidential debate
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence shake hands as they arrive for their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano arrives on the debate stage at the start of the debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano (L) looks on as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (R) at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano (R) looks on as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (L) listens as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks and moderator Elaine Quijano (C) looks on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine discusses an issue with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (off camera) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Rev. Jesse Jackson listens during the debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks during his debate against Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (not shown) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine debate Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (R) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
The audience watch the U.S. vice presidential debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks as Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (C) and debate moderator Elaine Quijano (R) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (L) speaks as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and debate as moderator Elaine Quijano (C) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (C) speaks during his debate aginst Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence moderated by Elaine Quijano (L) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) listens as Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence speaks during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine gestures during the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks during his debate against Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence, moderated by Elaine Quijano at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence speaks as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and moderator Elaine Quijano (C) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine discusses an issue with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (off camera) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (C) debate during their vice presidential debate moderated by Elaine Quijano (R) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence greets his wife Karen Pence after the conclusion of the debate with Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine (C) and his wife Anne Holton (R) greet a guest in the audience at the conclusion of the debate with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Anne Holton (R), the wife of Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine greets her husband after the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Anne Holton (L), wife of Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine shakes hands with Karen Pence (R), wife of Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Mike Pence at the start of the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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