Arnold Schwarzenegger on Trump: 'I will not vote for the Republican candidate for president'

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Arnold Schwarzenegger will not vote for Donald Trump during the 2016 general election, he said in written statement released on Twitter Saturday.

"For the first time since I became a citizen in 1983, I will not vote for the Republican candidate for President," Schwarzenegger said.

Schwarzenegger further added: "Like many Americans, I've been conflicted by this election – I still haven't made up my mind about how exactly I will vote next month. I have been a proud Republican since I moved to America in 1968 and I heard Nixon's words about getting the government off our backs, free trade, and defending our liberty with a strong military. That day I joined the party of Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan."

Take a look back on Schwarzenegger's run for office:

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Arnold Schwarzenegger runs for Governor
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Arnold Schwarzenegger runs for Governor
Austrian-born California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger throws t-shirts after addressing the crowd at the California Republican Party Convention in Los Angeles September 13, 2003. Recent polls indicated that Schwarzenegger runs second in the vote for the October 7vote, which asks Californians to vote for or against the recall of Democratic Gov. Gray Davis, and, if for the recall, then to vote for a new governor. AFP PHOTO / HECTOR MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
RIVERSIDE, CA - SEPTEMBER 4: California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger makes a campaign appearance September 4, 2003 in Riverside, California. A day after Schwarzenegger was a no-show at a political debate featuring Gov. Gray Davis, and five of the top candidates in the race to replace Davis, the movie star urged supporters to get out the vote in the October 7 recall election. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
A man holds banners asking actor Arnold Scharzenegger not to run for Governor of California in front of the Mann's Chinese Theater in Hollywood 02 July 2003. The movement called 'Anybody but Arnold for Governor' was launched by a group of fans during the opening of the movie 'Terminator 3'. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - AUGUST 7: Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger holds the papers he pulled at the Los Angeles County Registar's office to enter the race to unseat current democratic Governor Gray Davis in the October 7 recall election on August 7, 2003 in Norwalk, California. Schwarzenegger announced his run for governor August 6 on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
A man holds banners asking actor Arnold Scharzenegger not to run for Governor of California in front of the Mann's Chinese Theater in Hollywood 02 July 2003. The movement called 'Anybody but Arnold for Governor' was launched by a group of fans during the opening of the movie 'Terminator 3'. AFP PHOTO / HECTOR MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
LONG BEACH, CA - SEPTEMBER 3: Gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) rallies before California State University, Long Beach students September 3, 2003 in Long Beach, California. A supporter's sign (L) opposes Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante for governor. Schwarzenegger attended this event instead of participating in today's gubernatorial candidate debate in Walnut Creek, California. Schwarzenegger is expected to skip all gubernatorial candidate debates, except for one, which is scheduled for September 17 in Sacramento. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
DANA POINT, CA, SEPTEMBER 5: California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger addresses a meeting of the California Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors on September 5, 2003 in Dana Point, California. Schwarzenegger is campaigning to unseat current Gov. Gray Davis, who was re-elected last November, in the October 7 recall election. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Supporters of California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger wait for him to address the crowd during a rally at the California Republican Party Convention in Los Angeles September 13, 2003. Recent polls indicated that Schwarzenegger runs second in the vote for the October 7 vote, which asks Californians to vote for or against the recall of Democratic Governor Gray Davis, and, if for the recall, then to vote for a new governor. AFP PHOTO / HECTOR MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - SEPTEMBER 16: California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger (C) gestures as he speaks with immigrants at his 'Ask Arnold Town Hall' meeting for immigrants only at the Hollenbeck Youth Center September 16, 2003 in Los Angeles, California. A ruling by a federal appeals panel September 15 could delay the special October 7 recall election until March 2004 because voters in Los Angeles and five other counties would be using error-prone punch card machines that are still months from being phased out. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Austrian-born California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger delivers a speech during a lunch at the California Republican Party Convention in Los Angeles September 13, 2003. Schwarzenegger asked republicans to unite behind him to fight the Davis-Bustamante campaign on the recall election. Recent polls indicated that Schwarzenegger runs second in the vote for the October 7 vote, which asks Californians to vote for or against the recall of Democratic Governor Gray Davis, and, if for the recall, then to vote for a new governor. AFP PHOTO / HECTOR MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - SEPTEMBER 16: California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger (L) gestures as he speaks with immigrants at his 'Ask Arnold Town Hall' meeting for immigrants only at the Hollenbeck Youth Center September 16, 2003 in Los Angeles, California. A ruling by a federal appeals panel September 15 could delay the special October 7 recall election until March 2004 because voters in Los Angeles and five other counties would be using error-prone punch card machines that are still months from being phased out. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 07: California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger celebrates his victory over Democrat Treasurer Phil Angelides on Election Night on November 7, 2006 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Eric Washburn runs along the campus of California State University Sacramento carry a sign supporting Arnold Schwarzenegger. (Photo by Steve Grayson/WireImage)
SANTA MONICA, CA - SEPTEMBER 26: Rep. Darrell Issa gestures as he announces his endorsement for California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger (L) on September 26, 2003 in Santa Monica, California. Rep. Issa spent $1.7 million bankrolling the California Gov. Gray Davis recall effort and later dropped out of the race for governor. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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Schwarzenegger continued: "But as proud as I am to label myself a Republican, there is one label that I hold above all else – American. So I want to take a moment today to remind my fellow Republicans that it is not only acceptable to choose your country over your party – it is your duty."

The Washington Post published the full tape of Trump boasting about kissing, groping and having sex with women, saying that "when you're a star, they let you do anything ... I don't even wait. And when you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything," he said. "Grab 'em by the p-y."

Although Republican support is dropping off, Trump told the Wall Street Journal on Saturday there is "zero chance I'll quit."

See Trump and Clinton at the first presidential debate:

35 PHOTOS
Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off in first presidential debate
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Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off in first presidential debate
U.S. Secret Service agents walk onto the debate floor before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Workers on the stage prepare for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A TV cameraman works during a rehearsal for the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York September 25, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The media center for the first U.S. presidential debate is seen at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 24, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Ivanka Trump arrives for the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, waves to an attendee in the audience ahead of the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump meet Monday night for a presidential debate that will give them their broadest exposure to voters and promises to be a pivotal moment in a long and increasingly close race. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HEMPSTEAD, NY - SEPTEMBER 26: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's wife, Melania Trump greets with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's husband and former U.S. President Bill Clinton during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York. The first of four debates for the 2016 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by NBC's Lester Holt. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence looks on before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves after the first presidential debate against Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (not shown) at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican nominee Donald Trump leave the stage after the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (R) gestures next to Republican nominee Donald Trump during the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Moderator Lester Holt presides over the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Melania Trump (L-R), the wife of Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump, sits with his daughter Ivanka Trump, Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence and Pence's wife Karen Pence during Trump's first debate against Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (R) and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani chat as they take their seats ahead of the start of the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban arrives at the U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Las Vegas casino magnate Sheldon Adelson sits with his wife Miriam as they await the start of the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump Democratic and U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Promoter Don King Don King (C) speaks with Las Vegas casino owner Sheldon Adelson prior to the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Former U.S. President Bill Clinton (C) talks with his daughter Chelsea Clinton prior to the first presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. At right is Marc Mezvinsky, the husband of Chelsea Clinton. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump reacts during the first presidential debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton smiles during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump reacts during the first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton looks on during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Debate moderator Lester Holt of NBC News replaces his jacket after a technician fixed his earpiece before the first debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump pauses during the first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speak during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton discuss a point during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, speaks during the first U.S. presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump meet Monday night for a presidential debate that will give them their broadest exposure to voters and promises to be a pivotal moment in a long and increasingly close race. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton pauses during the first presidential debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump sips water during his first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (2nd from L) chats with members of his family after the conclusion of his first debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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