Cholera kills 13 in southwest Haiti in wake of Matthew, dozens ill

By Joseph Guyler Delva

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Oct 8 (Reuters) - Cholera outbreaks have killed at least 13 people in southwest Haiti in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, government officials told Reuters on Saturday, voicing concern that the disease was spreading.

Six people died of Cholera in a hospital in the southern town of Randel, while another seven died in the western coastal town of Anse-dAinault, the officials said, likely as flood waters mixed with sewage.

Cholera causes severe diarrhea and can kill within hours if untreated. It is spread through contaminated water and has a short incubation period, which leads to rapid outbreaks.

Hurricane Matthew left almost 900 people dead in Haiti and caused major flooding and loss of livestock.

It slammed into South Carolina on Saturday, after skirting the Atlantic coast of Florida and Georgia, causing widespread power outages and flooding.

PHOTOS: Inside Haiti's Cholera fight

16 PHOTOS
Haiti's cholera fight
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Haiti's cholera fight
Evenel Dorvilier rests on a stretcher in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, May 28, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Patients rest on stretchers in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, May 28, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
 Boys lie on cholera beds, cots with a hole cut into the center and a bucket underneath, in the intake tent at a cholera clinic set up by Medecins sans Frontieres in the Tabarre neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, November 19, 2010. REUTERS/Allison Shelley/File Photo
A bucket filled with water mixed with chlorine for visitors to wash their hands is seen at the entrance of the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. Sign reads "Wash hands, before enter, before exit". REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Penina Midi (C) fans her sister who rests on a strecher in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Girls fill buckets with drinkable water at a source in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A girl cools off with drinkable water at a source in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Patients rest on stretchers in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A patient is drip-fed in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
 A Haitian with cholera arrives to receive treatment at St-Catherine hospital in the slum of Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince November 19, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/File Photo
A boy drinks drinkable water from a container at a source in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 7, 2016. Picture taken September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
 A Haitian with symptoms of cholera is transported in a wheelbarrow in the slums of Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince November 19, 2010. REUTERS/ Eduardo Munoz/File Photo
A protester holds up a sign during a demonstration against the UN mission in downtown Port-au-Prince November 18, 2010. REUTERS/Allison Shelley/File Photo
Figaro Nau rests on a stretcher in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, May 28, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A relative covers a patient with a blanket as she rests on a stretcher in the Cholera Treatment Center of Diquini in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, May 28, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
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Dr. Donald Francois, head of the Haitian health ministrys cholera program, said 62 others were sick with Cholera as a result of the storm.

"We are concerned about these new outbreaks of Cholera we are seeing in new districts," he told Reuters. "The situation is particularly difficult in Randel and (nearby) Port-a-Piment."

"I am on my way to the south region to assess the situation and ensure all the necessary measures are in place," he said, adding that he had heard unconfirmed reports that as many as 50 people may have died from Cholera in southern Haiti.

The aid group Doctors Without Borders scrambled teams by helicopter to southern Haiti to respond to Cholera cases.

PHOTOS: Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew

28 PHOTOS
Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, Cuba
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Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, Cuba
A man cuts branches off fallen trees in a flooded area by a river after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A woman stans by debris after the passage of Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man fixes a roof of a partially built house after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Siline Crossaint poses for portrait inside her house, after Hurricane Matthew passes Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A Haitian migrant is seen as a child rests inside a shelter, after leaving Brazil, where they were relocated to due to Haiti's 2010 earthquake, in Mexicali, Mexico, October 5, 2016. Picture taken October 5, 2016 REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
A Haitian migrant walks near garbage at the Hotel del Migrante shelter after leaving Brazil, where she relocated to after Haiti's 2010 earthquake, in Mexicali, Mexico, October 5, 2016. Picture taken October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
Isma Nadenje poses for a portrait inside her house, after Hurricane Matthew passes Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A girl cries as she stays with her relatives at a partially destroyed school after Hurricane Matthew passes Jeremie, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A man stands next to a destroyed house after Hurricane Matthew passes Jeremie, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People walk down the streets next to destroyed houses after Hurricane Matthew passes Jeremie, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A flooded river is seen after Hurricane Matthew passes Jeremie, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People walk down the street next to destroyed houses and fallen trees after Hurricane Matthew passes Jeremie, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A worker removes branches from the ground at the airport after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man works with damaged property in the Carbonera community of Guantanamo, Cuba following Hurricane Matthew, October 5, 2016. The storm slammed into Haiti and Cuba as a Category Four hurricane on October 4, 2016 but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center (NHC). Its winds were howling at 115 miles per hour (185 kilometers per hour). / AFP / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
Children are seen before damaged property in the Carbonera community of Guantanamo, Cuba following Hurricane Matthew, October 5, 2016. The storm slammed into Haiti and Cuba as a Category Four hurricane on October 4, 2016 but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center (NHC). Its winds were howling at 115 miles per hour (185 kilometers per hour). / AFP / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man is carried across the river La Digue in Petit Goave where the bridge collapsed during the rains of the Hurricane Matthew, southwest of Port-au-Prince, October 5, 2016. Haiti and the eastern tip of Cuba -- blasted by Matthew on October 4, 2016 -- began the messy and probably grim task of assessing the storm's toll. Matthew hit them as a Category Four hurricane but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center. / AFP / HECTOR RETAMAL (Photo credit should read HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A boat is seen inside a destroyed house next to the sea after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Part of a boat is seen on a street next to the sea after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Residents walk on a street after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man clears debris after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man cleans out the water from his flooded house after Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Women sit at the entrance of a house damaged by Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man walks in a flooded street, in a neighbourhood of the commune of Cite Soleil, in the Haitian Capital Port-au-Prince, on October 4, 2016. Hurricane Matthew slammed into Haiti, triggering floods and forcing thousands to flee the path of a storm that has already claimed three lives in the poorest country in the Americas. / AFP / HECTOR RETAMAL (Photo credit should read HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents observe an overflowing Guaso river in the Guantanamo province, on October 4, 2016. The most menacing storm in the Caribbean in nearly a decade, Matthew began battering Haiti late Monday with strong winds and rising sea levels, before barreling ashore some 250 miles west of the capital Port-au-Prince. / AFP / YAMIL LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
Picture taken on October 5, 2016 showing the state in which a road between Guantanamo and Baracoa was left after the passage of Hurricane Matthew through the eastern tip of Cuba on Tuesday afternoon. Hurricane Matthew, the Caribbean's worst storm in nearly a decade, barreled towards the Bahamas Wednesday morning after killing nine people and pummeling Haiti and Cuba. / AFP / Yamil LAGE (Photo credit should read YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images)
A relative of two siblings who died when a landslide knocked the walls of their house down during the passage of Hurricane Matthew, sits in the window of a house in the neighbourhood of Capotillo, in Santo Domingo on October 4, 2016. Matthew, a Category Four hurricane, slammed into the Dominican Republic and Haiti Tuesday, triggering major floods and forcing thousands to flee the path of the storm that has claimed at least three lives in each country. / AFP / afp / Erika SANTELICES (Photo credit should read ERIKA SANTELICES/AFP/Getty Images)
A child stands on a street, after Hurricane Matthew passes Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
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Before the hurricane struck, the Central Emergency Response Fund released a loan of $8 million to UNICEF, the United Nations Childrens' Fund, to ramp up the response to a worsening Cholera epidemic in Haiti.

"In 2016 almost 27,000 Cholera cases have been reported in Haiti, and over 240 people have died. Hurricane Matthew is feared to significantly worsen the situation and increase the risk of a larger outbreak," CERF said in a statement on Friday. (Reporting by Joseph Guyler Delva; Writing by Simon Gardner; Editing by Toni Reinhold)

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