Mike Pence a 2020 favorite after vice presidential debate

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The vice presidential debate Tuesday, full of sharp barbs and head shakes, was largely ruled a win for Donald Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, but many pundits agreed that he helped himself – and his future political prospects – more than he boosted the current Republican ticket.

A new poll out Friday shows the analysts were right: Pence, the governor of Indiana, topped the list for whom Republicans would like to see as their nominee in 2020 if Trump loses in November.

SEE ALSO: David Letterman: Donald Trump is a 'damaged human,' and I would have 'gone right after him'

The Politico/Morning Consult poll found 22 percent of Republican voters would want to see Pence at the top of the ticket in four years, compared with 13 percent who said they would want to see Trump give it another go.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who was Mitt Romney's running mate on the GOP ticket in 2012, would also be the choice of 13 percent.

Heated moments from the vice presidential debate

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Vice presidential debate
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence shake hands as they arrive for their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano arrives on the debate stage at the start of the debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano (L) looks on as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (R) at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Debate moderator Elaine Quijano (R) looks on as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (L) listens as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks and moderator Elaine Quijano (C) looks on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine discusses an issue with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (off camera) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Rev. Jesse Jackson listens during the debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks during his debate against Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (not shown) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine debate Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (R) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
The audience watch the U.S. vice presidential debate between Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks as Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (C) and debate moderator Elaine Quijano (R) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (L) speaks as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and debate as moderator Elaine Quijano (C) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (C) speaks during his debate aginst Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence moderated by Elaine Quijano (L) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) listens as Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence speaks during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine gestures during the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence discuss an issue during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Gombert/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) shakes hands with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at the start of their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine speaks during his debate against Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence, moderated by Elaine Quijano at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Keane
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence speaks as Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine and moderator Elaine Quijano (C) look on during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine discusses an issue with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (off camera) during their vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine (L) and Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence (C) debate during their vice presidential debate moderated by Elaine Quijano (R) at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence greets his wife Karen Pence after the conclusion of the debate with Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Senator Tim Kaine at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Raedle/Pool
Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine (C) and his wife Anne Holton (R) greet a guest in the audience at the conclusion of the debate with Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Anne Holton (R), the wife of Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine greets her husband after the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Anne Holton (L), wife of Democratic U.S. vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine shakes hands with Karen Pence (R), wife of Republican U.S. vice presidential nominee Mike Pence at the start of the vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, U.S., October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who came in second place to Trump in the Republican primary this year but angered many party faithful by pointedly refusing to endorse Trump at the Republican National Convention, is favored by 12 percent of Republicans. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who also ran unsuccessfully for the 2016 nomination, earned 11 percent support.

Survey respondents said Tuesday night's debate had a significant impact on how they see Pence, with a majority of all registered voters – 52 percent – saying they now have a more favorable view of the candidate. Thirty-three percent said they have a "much more favorable" impression of him.

Republicans are particularly pleased with Pence, with 79 percent saying the debate improved their view of their vice presidential nominee. Nearly 1 in 3 Trump supporters said they would prefer to vote for Pence at the top of the ticket, rather than Trump.

Overall, however, the debate seems to have had almost no impact on the shape of the race. A whopping 84 percent of registered voters said the debate did not change who they plan to vote for on Nov. 8.

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