One of the largest-ever dinosaur footprints has just been unearthed in the desert

One of the biggest-ever dinosaur footprints has just been uncovered in the Gobi Desert, an arid region that spans Northern China and Southern Mongolia. Researchers unearthed the giant 77 cm-wide prints on a Mongolian-Japanese expedition, and they say that it could offer new information about its owner.

The footprint is believed to have belonged to a Titanosaur, a long-necked plant-eating dinosaur. They were some of the heaviest animals ever to walk the earth, weighing up to 90 tonnes. Titanosaurs were the last group of sauropods — the same group as the Brachiosaurus — who roamed the earth 90 to 66 million years ago.

The desert where the print was found is now covered in sand, but when dinosaurs were around, researchers suspect it would have been soft and muddy. Those conditions are likely why the print was preserved.

Learn more about the Titanosaur:

10 PHOTOS
Titanosaur debuts in Natural History Museum
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Titanosaur debuts in Natural History Museum
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
Photo courtesy: YouTube
In January 2016, the Museum is adding another must-see exhibit to its world-famous Fossil Halls: a cast of a 122-foot-long dinosaur. This species is so new that it has not yet been formally named by the paleontologists who discovered it. Paleontologists suggest this dinosaur, a giant herbivore that belongs to a group known as titanosaurs, weighed in at around 70 tons. The species lived in the forests of today’s Patagonia about 100 to 95 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous period, and is one of the largest dinosaurs ever discovered. The remains were excavated in the Patagonian desert region of Argentina by a team from the Museum of Paleontology Egidio Feruglio led by José Luis Carballido and Diego Pol, who received his Ph.D. at the American Museum of Natural History. The titanosaur cast will be installed in the Wallach Orientation Center on the fourth floor. Learn more about the titanosaur: http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/the-titanosaur VIDEO CREDITS: VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle PHOTOGRAPHY Dr. Alejandro Otero MUSIC: “Evolution to Space” by Colleen Sharmat - Warner Chappell Production Music
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"This is a very rare discovery as it's a well-preserved fossil footprint that is more than a metre long with imprints of its claws," said the researchers in a statement from Okayama University of Science.

But this isn't the first time in recent years that such a giant dinosaur print has been uncovered.

Several massive dinosaur tracks have been discovered around the world.

In 2015, large footprints were found on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, which are believed to have also been made by sauropods. They measured 70 cm in diameter and were the first sauropod tracks to be found in Scotland.

And last August, researchers found the largest-ever carnivorous dinosaur prints in Bolivia. The prints were 115 cm wide and believed to be tracks from an Abelisaurus — a cousin of the Tyrannosaurus rex. These dinosaurs could grow to be over a whopping 12 meters tall and are thought to have lived around 70 million years ago.

The largest prints ever found were uncovered in France in 2009. They were nearly 2 meters wide and belonged to sauropods, the same species as the most recent discovery.

See more about another recent dinosaur footprint discovery:

19 PHOTOS
Largest Dinosaur print found
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Largest Dinosaur print found
People stand next to a footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 20, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia measures the footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting with a tour guide the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia touches a dinosaur's footprint at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 20, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
A man walks next to dinosaur footprints at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Children play with the replica of a dinosaur fossil at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A child walks up a playground climber with dinosaur footprints at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A mother takes a photograph of her children while they pose in front of the replica of a Tyrannosaurus rex at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Children have a snack while sitting next to the replica of a Tyrannosaurus rex at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
The replica of a Titanosaur is seen at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Visitors walk underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A visitor walks underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
The replica of a Titanosaur is seen at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Visitors walk underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia measures the footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
A truck unloads rocks next to the Cal Orko cliff where thousands of dinosaur's footprints can be seen, in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
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