Grandfather sues grandson for grandmother's wrongful death

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A grandfather is suing his 13-year-old grandson in a wrongful death case.

CBS News is reporting that Paul Sang Cho has filed a lawsuit against the unnamed boy, accusing him of negligence which contributed to the death of Kuem Soon Cho, the elder man's wife and the boy's grandmother.

A look at driverless cars

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Chris Urmson, director of the Self Driving Cars Project at Google, speaks during a preview of Google's prototype autonomous vehicles in Mountain View, California, U.S., September 29, 2015. To match Special Report AUTOS-DRIVERLESS/ REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/File Photo
Daniel Goehring, of the AutoNOMOS research team of the Artificial Intelligence Group at the Freie Universitaet (Free University), demonstrates hands-free driving of the research car named 'MadeInGermany' during a test in Berlin, Germany February 28, 2011. To match Special Report AUTOS-DRIVERLESS/ REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch/File Photo
A Lexus version of a Google Self Driving car is shown in Moutain View, California, U.S., April 8, 2016. To match Special Report AUTOS-DRIVERLESS/ REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
A Lexus version of a Google Self Driving car is shown in Mountain View, California, U.S., April 8, 2016. To match Special Report AUTOS-DRIVERLESS/ REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
File photograph shows video captured by a Google self-driving car coupled with the same street scene as the data is visualized by the car during a presentation at a media preview of Google's prototype autonomous vehicles in Moutain View, California, September 29, 2015. Britain said on March 12, 2016 it will begin trialling driverless cars on motorways for the first time in 2017, as it moves towards its goal of allowing autonomous cars to take to the streets by 2020. Finance minister George Osborne will announce plans on Wednesday to test vehicles on motorways and say the government will bring forward proposals to remove regulatory barriers to the technology, the Treasury said. Alphabet Inc GOOGL.O unit Google wants to eventually be able to deploy fully autonomous vehicles without human controls, and major automakers are racing to develop vehicles that can drive themselves at least part of the time. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/Files
File photograph shows the rear of a Lexus SUV equipped with Google self-driving sensors during a media preview of Google's prototype autonomous vehicles in Mountain View, California September 29, 2015. Britain said on March 12, 2016 it will begin trialling driverless cars on motorways for the first time in 2017, as it moves towards its goal of allowing autonomous cars to take to the streets by 2020. Finance minister George Osborne will announce plans on Wednesday to test vehicles on motorways and say the government will bring forward proposals to remove regulatory barriers to the technology, the Treasury said. Alphabet Inc GOOGL.O unit Google wants to eventually be able to deploy fully autonomous vehicles without human controls, and major automakers are racing to develop vehicles that can drive themselves at least part of the time. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/Files
A driverless vehicle runs at Vanke's Building Research Centre testing area in Dongguan, south China's Guangdong province November 2, 2015. The country's largest property developer, China Vanke, is investing in its own robots to do certain jobs in the face of a labor shortage in the world's most populated country. This driverless car is among the robots that Vanke is aiming to bring in. Picture taken November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
A driverless vehicle runs at Vanke's Building Research Centre testing area in Dongguan, south China's Guangdong province November 2, 2015. The country's largest property developer, China Vanke, is investing in its own robots to do certain jobs in the face of a labor shortage in the world's most populated country. This driverless car is among the robots that Vanke is aiming to bring in. Picture taken November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
A worker walks past a driverless vehicle at Vanke's Building Research Centre testing area in Dongguan, south China's Guangdong province November 2, 2015. The country's largest property developer, China Vanke, is investing in its own robots to do certain jobs in the face of a labor shortage in the world's most populated country. This driverless car is among the robots that Vanke is aiming to bring in. Picture taken November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
Karl-Thomas Neumann, chief officer for electric traction for Volkswagen Group of America, speaks during a demonstration of a driverless car at the Volkswagen Automotive Innovation Laboratory at Stanford University in Stanford, California April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Kevin Bartram (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION BUSINESS POLITICS TRANSPORT SCI TECH)
Computers and other equipment fill the back of an unmanned car during a demonstration of a driverless car at the Volkswagen Automotive Innovation Laboratory at Stanford University in Stanford, California April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Kevin Bartram (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION BUSINESS POLITICS TRANSPORT SCI TECH)
People ride on a driverless electric vehicle at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore September 4, 2013. The eight-passenger shuttle vehicle named Navia makes use of laser rangefinders, cameras and a navigation software that allows it to move autonomously and safely at speeds up to 20 km/h, according to manufacturer Induct. Induct and NTU's Energy Research Institute has teamed up to test and optimize Navia in a two-year collaboration aimed at improving the reliability of the battery and reducing charging time, according to local media. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: TRANSPORT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY ENERGY EDUCATION)
A monitor in the back seat displays sensor readings and other information in a driverless car at the Volkswagen Automotive Innovation Laboratory at Stanford University in Stanford, California April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Kevin Bartram (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION BUSINESS POLITICS TRANSPORT SCI TECH)
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The tragic incident occurred in Niles near Chicago on the evening of March 26, 2016.

According to a media release issued by the Niles Police Department, "The victim had given the keys to her 2005 Chrysler mini van to her 13 year old grandson to assist her in placing the vehicle into gear."

However, the teen accidentally reversed the vehicle, causing the driver's door, which was ajar at the time, to hit the elderly woman who later died.

The grandfather's lawsuit reportedly claims that "the grandson carelessly failed to keep the vehicle under control, failed to give warning and failed to yield the right of way...."

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