Fox News poll confirms: Hillary Clinton won the debate in a landslide

A Fox News poll released Friday confirmed what other scientific surveys have found in the aftermath of the first presidential debate: Hillary Clinton prevailed over Donald Trump in the affair, and she has seen a slight overall national bump because of it.

The poll, which was conducted entirely after the debate, found that 61% of voters who watched the debate viewed Clinton as the winner. Just 21% thought Trump came out on top.

Clinton also experienced a slight improvement among likely voters nationally, according to the poll. She was up 5 points in a head-to-head matchup, 49% to 44%, and 3 points in a four-way race that included Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson and Green Party nominee Jill Stein.

Click through top notable presidential debate moments in history:

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15 notable presidential debate moments in history
(Original Caption) San Francisco: Jimmy Carter (L) takes notes as Pres. Ford makes a point during the second of the presidential debates at the Palace of Fine Arts here.
Rick Perry stumbles when trying to name the three Federal Departments he would eliminate as president during the CNBC Michigan GOP Presidential Debate in Rochester, Michigan. (Photo by Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images)
ST. LOUIS - OCTOBER 02: Democratic vice presidential candidate U.S. Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) and Republican vice presidential candidate Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (L) greet each other at the start of the vice presidential debate at the Field House of Washington University's Athletic Complex on October 2, 2008 in St. Louis, Missouri. The highly anticipated showdown between the two vice-presidential candidates will be their only debate before the election. (Photo by Don Emmert-Pool/Getty Images)
Presidential candidate Ross Perot speaks during the 1992 Presidential Debates. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, United States: US Vice-President Dick Cheney points during his face off with Democratic vice-presidential candidate John Edwards at Case Western Reserve University 05 October, 2004 in Cleveland, Ohio. The vice-presidential debate is focusing on foreign and domestic policies. AFP PHOTO/Steve JAFFE (Photo credit should read STEVE JAFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
YEAR-2008 US Republican presidential candidate John McCain (R) and Democrat Barack Obama leave the table after the final presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on October 15, 2008. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)
New York Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) stands on stage with rival Illinois Senator Barack Obama (C) and Republican presidential contender Arizona Senator John McCain (R) at the end of the ABC/Facebook New Hampshire debates in Manchester, 05 January 2008. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel DUNAND (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Omaha, Nebraska: Following their vice presidential debate, Senators Lloyd Bentsen (L) of Texas and Dan Quayle (R) of Indiana reach out to shake hands, October 5th.
NASHVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 07: Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) (R) speaks during the debate with Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) (L) at the Town Hall Presidential Debate at Belmont University's Curb Event Center October 7, 2008 in Nashville, Tennessee. Tonight's debate is the second presidential debate of three, the only one being held in the town hall style with questions coming from audience members. (Photo by Anthony Jacobs/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, United States: Gwen Ifill (C), moderator of the vice-presidential debate, faces US Vice-President Dick Cheney (L) and Democratic vice-presidential candidate John Edwards 05 October, 2004 during the candidates only face-to-face debate in the 2004 White House race at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.The vice-presidential debate is focusing on foreign and domestic policies. AFP PHOTO/Jeff HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 13: Vice presidential candidate James Stockdale, an independent candidate, speaks during the debate at Georgia Tech 13 October, 1992 in Atlanta, GA. Stockdale debated Vice President Dan Quayle and Senator Al Gore. (Photo credit should read J. DAVID AKE/AFP/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Kansas City: Combo of President Reagan and his Democratic opponent, Walter Mondale in their final Presidential debate of the 1984 campaign in Kansas City.
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2000: Texas Gov. George W. Bush answers a question as Vice President Al Gore looks on during the third and final presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. (Photo by Harry Hamburg/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
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Both were improvements for Clinton from the previous Fox News survey, which found Trump leading by 1 point in a four-way race and trailing by 1 in the two-way matchup.

The Fox News survey is especially noteworthy because of the way some of its hosts have referred to online, non-scientific post-debate polls to make the case that Trump came out of the debate victorious. The Trump campaign and its surrogates have also cited those online polls to claim victory.

Dana Blanton, the vice president of public-opinion research at Fox News, wrote a memo to television producers and the politics team this week to remind them that online polls "do not meet our editorial standards." Host Sean Hannity, a vehement Trump supporter, has continued to cite such polls despite the memo.

Respondents from at least five other polls — from CNN/ORC, Politico/Morning Consult, NBC/SurveyMonkey, Public Policy Polling, and Gallup — have all declared Clinton the winner. Gallup found Clinton's perceived debate win to be among the largest in modern campaign history.

The Fox News poll released Friday surveyed 1,009 registered voters from September 27 to 29.

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