Hillary Clinton's chances of being elected president skyrocket

Many post-debate public opinion polls suggested that Hillary Clinton likely beat Donald Trump in their first face-off, and now that appears to be having an impact on election projections.

Hillary Clinton has received a significant bump in election projections released Friday.

Predictions coming from Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight show Clinton's chances of winning the presidency at 64.8 percent, as opposed to Trump's 35.2 percent -- that's according to his "polls plus" prediction.

RELATED: See how people reacted to the debate

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People all over the world watching the first presidential debate of 2016
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People all over the world watching the first presidential debate of 2016
People, including U.S. Democrats living in Mexico, watch a television broadcast of the first presidential debate between U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, in a restaurant in Mexico City, Mexico September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
People watch the U.S. presidential debate in a restaurant in the Queens borough of New York City, September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People watch a direct broadcast of the first U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at a cafe in Beijing, China, September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
A U.S. Democrat living in Mexico watches a television broadcast of the first presidential debate between U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump, in Mexico City, Mexico September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
A customer and waitress can be seen in a cafe in Sydney, Australia, September 27, 2016 as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton are displayed on a screen during the first presidential debate. REUTERS/David Gray
Images of U.S. democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during their first presidential debate are shown on television screens at a store in San Diego, California, U.S. September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Sandy Huffaker
An employee of a foreign exchange trading company looks at a monitor displaying first U.S. presidential debate between U.S. Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, as others showing the Japanese yen's exchange rate against the U.S. dollar in Tokyo, Japan, September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Clinton supporters watch the first US presidential debate between Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump, at a debate watch party at The Abbey bar and restaurant in West Hollywood, California, September 26, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watch the first presidential debates during a Debate Watch Party at Jake's Sports & Spirits in Denver, Colorado on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Students watch the first Presidential Debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during a viewing event at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Students watch the first Presidential Debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during a viewing event at Hofstra University's in Hempstead, New York on September 26, 2016. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump recite the Pledge of Allegiance prior to the start of the first presidential debate between Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, while gathering at the Colorado Republican Party's Adams County Victory Office in Thornton, Colorado, on September 26, 2016. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Members and supporters of the LGBT community watch the first presidential debate during a debate watch party in Chicago, Illinois on September 26, 2016. / AFP / derek henkle (Photo credit should read DEREK HENKLE/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - SEPTEMBER 26: Rebecca Beach reacts to comments from Donald Trump during a watch party for the presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump at the South Carolina Hillary Clinton campaign headquarters September 26, 2016 in Columbia, South Carolina. It was the first debate between the two party nominees. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Clinton supporters watch the first US presidential debate between Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump, at a debate watch party at The Abbey bar and restaurant in West Hollywood, California, September 26, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican student watches on his smartphone the first US presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton on a street in downtown Guadalajara, Mexico on September 26, 2016. / AFP / HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 26: Patrons fill the Capitol Lounge two blocks from the U.S. Captiol to watch the first presidential debate between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton September 26, 2016 in Washington, DC. The historic one-and-a-half hour debate was broadcast on CNN. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 26: Potential voters watch the first presidential debate between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump at a bar on September 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The 90-minute televised debate comes six weeks before the general election. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
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If the election were taking place immediately, the data suggests that the former Secretary of State is more likely to win the presidency by a 3 to 1 margin.

The results occurred despite Clinton only being ahead in the polls by a mere 2.9 percent, according to Real Clear Politics data.

FiveThirtyEight projects Clinton will win 291 electoral votes come November, with Trump just shy of 247. A candidate must win 270 electoral votes in order to become the next president.

The increase stems from Clinton's increased chances of winning in several swing states post-debate.

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