Donald Trump unleashes on 'dopey' Mark Cuban, threatens to seat ex-Bill Clinton mistress next to him at debate

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Donald Trump threatened on Saturday to put Gennifer Flowers, a woman Bill Clinton said he had an affair with, in the front row of Monday's debate as a direct result of Hillary Clinton's campaign giving Mark Cuban a front-row seat at the titanic event.

"If dopey Mark Cuban of failed Benefactor fame wants to sit in the front row, perhaps I will put Gennifer Flowers right alongside of him," he wrote on Twitter.

The Benefactor was a 2004 reality TV show starring Cuban, who is more widely known as the owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks and star of ABC's "Shark Tank."

Click through images of Mark Cuban through the years:

15 PHOTOS
Mark Cuban: Through The Years
See Gallery
Mark Cuban: Through The Years
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban stands behind the Dallas bench in the opening minutes against the New York Knicks during their NBA game February 24, 2014 at Madison Square Garden in New York. The Mavericks won, 110-108. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 17: Owner Mark Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks looks on during the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at US Airways Center on January 17, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Mavericks defeated the Suns 110-107. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, speaks with members of the media as he exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013. Cuban said he doesn't recall details of a conversation in which he was allegedly warned that information he received about a company was confidential. Photographer: Mike Fuentes/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2013. Cuban goes to trial over regulators' claims he engaged in insider trading when he sold his stake in a Canadian Internet search company nine years ago. Photographer: Ben Torres/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 24: TV personality Mark Cuban attends the 2013 American Music Awards Powered by Dodge at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on November 24, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Charley Gallay/AMA2013/Getty Images for Dodge)
The Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant (24) is hugged Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban after the Mavs' 90-82 win at the American Airlines Center in Dallas on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA,PA - NOVEMBER 16: Owner of the Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban looks on against the Philadelphia 76ers at Wells Fargo Center on November 16, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2015 NBAE (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMBER 16: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, looks on prior to the game against the Philadelphia 76ers on November 16, 2015 at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES CA - OCTOBER 29: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, follows the action from behind the bench during the third quarter of the basketball game against Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center October 29, 2015, in Los Angeles California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, Investor, Entrepreneur and Owner, Dallas Mavericks, offers his critique to finalists at the Global Startup Showcase, as one of four judges at 2015 WSJD Live on October 20, 2015 in Laguna Beach, California. WSJ D Live brings together top CEOs, founders, pioneers, investors and luminaries to explore the most exciting tech opportunities emerging around the world. AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SHARK TANK - Lori Greiner, Mark Cuban, Daymond John, Barbara Corcoran, Robert Herjavec and Kevin O'Leary is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
SHARK TANK - Mark Cuban is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Trump misspelled Flowers' name in a prior tweet, later deleting it and replacing the tweet with the correct spelling.

Cuban fired back shortly after.

"Donald. Remember when you told me on the phone we were "Bobbsie Twins" and I laughed ? #truestory," he quipped to Twitter.

Cuban, a Clinton supporter since he endorsed the Democratic nominee at a Pittsburgh rally in July, has ripped Trump repeatedly on social media and in interviews, calling him the most "dangerous" presidential candidate he can imagine during a recent interview with Business Insider. Cuban recently offered Trump $10 million to hold a four-hour policy debate with him.

After the Clinton campaign gifted Cuban with what they referred to as the best seat they had available for Monday's debate, Cuban said he was ready for the former secretary of state to "overwhelm" her opponent at the looming political slugfest.

Trump recently addressed Cuban's criticism in an interview with Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo, insisting that Cuban tweets constantly at him and promising to show the host all of the messages.

The NBA owner is known for his courtside antics at Mavericks games, famously ripping referees for what he believes to be bad calls. That reputation led to CNN host Michael Smerconish asking Commission on Presidential Debates co-chair Frank Fahrenkopf during a Saturday morning interview about Cuban's front-row presence.

"We'll tell you this right now, whether or not a Republican or Democrat or anyone else attempts by use of the tickets in placing people in a front row or not to try to impact the debate — It's wrong," the debate co-chair said. "We would frown upon Mr. Cuban being in the front row if his purpose is to somehow disrupt the debates, likewise, if Mr. Trump were to put someone in the front row to try to impact things."

"So, I've been working," he continued. "We've been working with the campaigns staff. I don't think that's going to be a problem. They're approaching this as a very dignified manner in the way I think it should be approached."

Alan Dershowitz, professor emeritus at Harvard Law School, told CNN he thought the Clinton campaign's decision to have Cuban in the front row was "a mistake."

"Because first of all, it reaffirms the notion that Hillary Clinton is subordinate to millionaires and billionaires," he said. "Second, if they wanted to surprise Donald Trump, we wouldn't know about it. They would simply seat him in the front row moments before the debate began."

"I see no upside, and substantial downside," he said. "They're being too cute. It will backfire."

Earlier in the cycle, Cuban was more enthralled with the idea of a Trump presidency and had expressed interest in serving as either Trump or Clinton's vice president before eventually souring on the Republican nominee's candidacy.

"I mean you guys have been covering me for a long time," Cuban told Business Insider in that recent interview. "I mean, I've historically been apolitical. You've never heard me talk about politics all that much. And it's just, I can't think of anybody more dangerous as president than Donald Trump."

"I can't think of anything worse than with him not having a clue," he continued. "I mean, could you imagine somebody who doesn't read and doesn't learn trying to deal with the day-to-day changes and challenges of that job?"

NOW WATCH: Donald Trump is under fire for his comments about the Iraq War

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners