ISIS and Al-Qaeda celebrate 9/11, threaten more attacks

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
ISIS and jihadist supporters are celebrating the 15th anniversary of the September 11 terror attacks and threatening more violence.

Supporters of ISIS, which split from al-Qaeda in 2014 and is now the leading global terror group, celebrated on Twitter, Telegram, and one of the group's main forums, seizing the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks as an opportunity to spew bellicose rhetoric and circulate anti-Western propaganda. Dozens of ISIS-related channels on Telegram, a messaging app, circulated an image of the burning World Trade Center, saying "the anniversary of 9/11 that gladdened the hearts of the believers irked the infidels. May Allah accept its planners and executors, with the apple of our eyes, Sheikh al-Mujahideen Osama bin Laden on top of them."

Click though image of the dust and ash that caused illnesses after 9/11:

12 PHOTOS
The dust and ash that caused illnesses after 9/11
See Gallery
The dust and ash that caused illnesses after 9/11
The remaining tower of New York's World Trade Center, Tower 2, dissolves in a cloud of dust and debris about a half hour after the first twin tower collapsed September 11, 2001. Each of the towers were hit by hijacked airliners in one of numerous acts of terrorism directed at the United States September 11, 2001. The pictures were made from across the Hudson River in Jersey City, New Jersey. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine
394261 78: Civilians take cover as a dust cloud from the collapse of the World Trade Center envelops lower Manhattan, September 11, 2001. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
This file photo dated 11 September 2001 shows Edward Fine covering his mouth as he walks through the debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center Towers in New York. Fine was on the 78th floor of 1 World Trade Center when it was hit by a hijacked plane 11 September. Americans mark the fourth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks Sunday nagged by new burning questions about their readiness to confront a major disaster after the debacle of Hurricane Katrina. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
394261 63: Dust swirls around south Manhattan moments after a tower of the World Trade Center collapsed September 11, 2001 in New York City after two airplanes slammed into the twin towers in an alleged terrorist attack. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Office towers of Lower Manhattan in New York's financial district engulfed in smoke and dust from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings. (Photo by James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images)
A man in a clothing store along lower Broadway in New York arranges a shirt in the window as clothes covered in dust and soot from the World Trade Center disaster sit on racks September 19, 2001. The attacks in New York and Washington left more than 5,000 people dead or missing and over 300 police and fire fighters were believed lost in the September 11 attack. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach MS
A group of firefighters walk near the remains of the destroyed World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001. Two hijacked U.S. commercial planes slammed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center early on Tuesday, causing both 110-story landmarks to collapse in thunderous clouds of fire and smoke. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton JC/SV
A group of firefighters stand in the street near the destroyed World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001. Two hijacked U.S. commercial planes slammed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, causing both 110-story landmarks to collapse in thunderous clouds of fire and smoke. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton JC/SV
An office filled with dust and damage has a view of the wreckage of the World Trade Center 25 September, 2001 in New York. Search and rescue efforts continue in the aftermath of the 11 September terrorist attack. AFP PHOTO/Eric FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Graffiti for victims of the World Trade Center are written on windows covered in dust from the collapse 22 September 2001 New York. War appeared imminent as the United States stepped up the deployment of military forces south and west of Afghanistan, the base of Saudi-born Osama bin Laden, who is pinpointed as the chief suspect in the deadly September 11 terrorist onslaught on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. AFP PHOTO Eric FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
398760 04: This image captured by a satellite on September 12, 2001 shows an area of white dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood in New York City. Terrorists slammed two hijacked airliners into the twin towers on September 11, killing some 3,000 people. (Photo by Spaceimaging.com/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Supporters of the group on Telegram asked fellow supporters to pray for Bin laden, who they called a "martyr," and for everyone who executed what they described as a "blessed operation." Others tweeted "we made the Cross drink from the cup of poison, thank God for the terror," while many linked the 9/11 anniversary to The Day of Arafah, one of the holiest days in the Islamic calendar and the second day of the Islamic pilgrimage that is ongoing in Mecca. "The Day of Arafah happens with the anniversary of the Manhattan attacks, may Allah accept its soldiers," one ISIS Telegram user wrote. "One auspicious event turned into two, Oh God complete make an attack against the infidel countries that will heal our hearts."

Other jihadist accounts tweeted "your morning of 9/11" and added a famous jihadist poem saying "we destroyed America with a civil aircraft, The World Trade Center turned into a pile of ashes."

Translation: "Do you remember the 15th anniversary of the Manhattan attack, Allah's mercy upon our Sheikh Osama Bin Laden"

The repugnant comments highlight that jihadists, with ISIS as their foremost leader, still see the 9/11 attacks as their biggest achievement. They also highlight how the Islamic State views itself as Bin Laden's successor and a group continuing al-Qaeda's tradition.

On Friday, Ayman al-Zawahiri, the heir of Bin Laden, released a video message marking the anniversary and threatened thousands of deadly attacks in the future. In another effort to keep his terror organization relevant, al-Zawahiri boasted that the September 2001 attacks were a "slap" on the face for America and its allies, ABC News reported, citing a translation by SITE Intelligence Group. "As long as your crimes continue, then the events of Sept. 11 will be repeated a thousand times, Allah permitting," al-Zawahiri said.

The post ISIS And Al-Qaeda Celebrate 9/11, Threaten More Attacks appeared first on Vocativ.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

Large Numbers Of Horses Are Being Stuffed Into These Crates For A Despicable Reason Large Numbers Of Horses Are Being Stuffed Into These Crates For A Despicable Reason
13 People Recount Their First Kiss Horror Stories 13 People Recount Their First Kiss Horror Stories
Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going