Kim Jong-un suspects citizens are mocking him, reportedly bans sarcasm

North Korea is not known as a place where open and honest expression is celebrated, so it likely comes as little surprise that another limitation on speech has reportedly been declared.

This time, the edict is said to be rooted in Kim Jong-un's fear that people in the nation are mocking him, notes the International Business Times.

As a remedy, he has reportedly banned sarcasm.

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Kim Jong Un flashes his computer skills for gathered North Korean officials. (KCNA/Reuters/Corbis)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - DECEMBER 17: South Korean conservative protesters burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un during an anti-North Korea protest marking the second anniversary of former North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's death on December 17, 2013 in Seoul, South Korea. The tension is heightened in South Korea since the report that North Korea has executed Jang Song-Thaek, Kim Jong Un's uncle on December 13, 2013. On December 17, 2013 North Korea also commemorates two years since the death of former leader Kim Jong-il. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - DECEMBER 17: South Korean conservative protesters shout slogans during an anti-North Korea protest marking the second anniversary of former North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's death on December 17, 2013 in Seoul, South Korea. The tension is heightened in South Korea since the report that North Korea has executed Jang Song-Thaek, Kim Jong Un's uncle on December 13, 2013. On December 17, 2013 North Korea also commemorates two years since the death of former leader Kim Jong-il. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
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According to a source who discussed the matter with Radio Free Asia, officials organized local meetings and outlined the specifics of the restriction.

One phrase said to be outlawed is, "This is all America's fault," which is used to explain North Korean problems that clearly stem from within the Asian nation's government.

Officials also reportedly advised that people stop saying, "A fool who cannot see the outside world," a reference to the leader's isolationist ways.

As Radio Free Asia's source noted, "The main point of the lecture was 'Keep your mouths shut.'"

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